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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2008
Issue number 760: October 27, 2008
 
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. CDC announces that the Hib vaccine shortage will continue until mid-2009
  2. The word from CDC is "Protect Yourself, Your Patients, and Family from Flu"
  3. Say "Boo!" to the Flu Program offers FREE influenza prevention materials to promote vaccination
  4. Important: Be sure to give influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season--through spring 2009
  5. CDC's Immunization Safety Office updates its HPV vaccine safety information
  6. FDA publishes "Addressing Questions about Gardasil," a Consumer Health Information resource on HPV vaccine
  7. CDC website spotlights current U.S. measles outbreaks on its "CDC Features" web section
  8. For coalitions: 173 immunization coalitions have posted information on www.izcoalitions.org--is yours one of them?
  9. October issue of CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter recently released
  10. MMWR reports on worldwide progress in introducing pneumococcal conjugate vaccine during 2000-2008
  11. Webcast on pandemic influenza planning to take place on October 29
  12. Phacilitate Vaccine Forum scheduled for Washington, DC, on January 26-28, 2009
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 760: October 27, 2008
1.  CDC announces that the Hib vaccine shortage will continue until mid-2009 [The following is cross posted from CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter, October 2008.]

HIB VACCINE SHORTAGE WILL CONTINUE TO MID-2009
On October 17, 2008, Merck Vaccine Division announced that they will be unable to return to the U.S. Hib vaccine market by the end of 2008 as originally planned. Merck stated that they will make a regulatory filing with the Food and Drug Administration for a manufacturing process change. The manufacturer now projects returning to the U.S. Hib vaccine market in mid-2009.

CDC is not changing the current shortage recommendations for Hib vaccination. The remaining U.S. supplier of Hib vaccine is sanofi pasteur, which makes a monovalent Hib vaccine, ActHIB, and a combination vaccine, Pentacel (DTaP/IPV/Hib). Sanofi pasteur projects sufficient Hib vaccine production to maintain the current 3-dose recommendation of Hib vaccine for most children until mid-2009, using a combination of Pentacel and ActHIB.

The CDC vaccine stockpile has a sufficient supply of unrecalled Merck PedvaxHIB vaccine to continue the current policy of vaccinating American Indian and Alaska Native children living in American Indian or Alaska Native communities with PedvaxHIB.

Thus far, we have not yet seen an increase in disease because of deferral of the booster dose at 12 to 15 months. The incidence of invasive Hib disease has declined dramatically in the U.S., resulting from high Hib vaccine coverage levels. Currently, the incidence of invasive Hib disease in children less than 5 years of age is 0.21 per 100,000, representing a greater than 99% reduction in disease compared [with] the pre-vaccine incidence. Children have a cushion of indirect protection against Hib infection [because of] high immunization coverage levels in the U.S. We are not certain how long this indirect protection will last. It is very important to directly protect infants by timely vaccination with the 3-dose primary series at 2, 4, and 6 months of age.
Information on the Hib vaccine shortage is available and kept up-to-date on the CDC vaccine [shortage] web section at: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/shortages
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2 The word from CDC is "Protect Yourself, Your Patients, and Family from Flu" [The following is cross posted from CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter, October 2008.]

PROTECT YOURSELF, YOUR PATIENTS, AND FAMILY FROM FLU
Influenza vaccine manufacturers are projecting that as many as 143-146 million doses of vaccine will be available for this season. All six U.S. manufacturers have already begun to ship this season's influenza vaccine, with almost all of the vaccine expected to be shipped and distributed by mid-November.

CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP; http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/acip) recommends that healthcare providers begin offering vaccination soon after vaccine becomes available and continue vaccinating into December and later. This is important because, during most years, influenza does not peak until February or later. Since influenza is unpredictable--and different types and strains of influenza circulate throughout the flu season--influenza vaccine should be offered throughout the influenza season, even after influenza has appeared or begun appearing in a community. To help get the word out about late-season vaccination, National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW; http://www.cdc.gov/flu/nivw) will take place December 8-14.

CDC has many influenza resources available at the Flu Website including free materials such as flyers, posters, stickers, and public service announcements for various public audiences and healthcare providers at the Flu Gallery. Please check the Gallery for new materials throughout the influenza season. Also, see the websites below for answers to common questions from providers, immunization partners, and the general public.

Where can I get a flu shot?
http://www.flucliniclocator.org

How can I advertise my public flu clinics?
http://www.lungusa.org/site/pp.asp?c=aqKGLXOAIlH&b=3090427
(Scroll down to August 2008 update and click on "Click here to download our agreement [in Word])

How can I let healthcare providers know I have flu vaccine for sale?
http://www.preventinfluenza.org/ivats
(Scroll down to Enrollment and click on "enroll.")
Where can I purchase influenza vaccine?
http://www.preventinfluenza.org/ivats
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3 Say "Boo!" to the Flu Program offers FREE influenza prevention materials to promote vaccination The Visiting Nurse Associations of America and Families Fighting Flu have joined together in the Say "Boo!" to the Flu Program. Intended to help educate families about the importance of influenza vaccination and about other measures that can prevent the spread of influenza, the program offers information and free promotional materials for use in fall and winter 2008-09.
To access promotional materials (e.g., poster, brochure, audio commentary) about vaccination, cough etiquette, cleaning and disinfecting surfaces, and hand washing, go to http://www.sayboototheflu.com/about.php
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4 Important: Be sure to give influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season--through spring 2009 Influenza vaccine for the 2008-09 influenza season is available. Vaccination should continue through the spring months of 2009. Visit the following websites often to find the information you need to keep vaccinating. Both are continually updated with the latest resources.

The National Influenza Vaccine Summit website at
http://www.preventinfluenza.org
CDC's Seasonal Flu web section at http://www.cdc.gov/flu
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5 CDC's Immunization Safety Office updates its HPV vaccine safety information On October 21, CDC's Immunization Safety Office updated its online information on the safety of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Following are links to the updated web pages:

For updated reports of health issues following HPV vaccination, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/vaers/gardasil.htm

For updated questions and answers about HPV vaccine safety, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/vaers/gardasil.htm
To access links to a variety of resources for healthcare professionals and the public regarding HPV vaccine safety, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/concerns/human_papillomavirus_vaccine.htm
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6 FDA publishes "Addressing Questions about Gardasil," a Consumer Health Information resource on HPV vaccine On September 29, FDA published a two-page, full-color print resource for the public titled "Addressing Questions About Gardasil." The publication, part of FDA's series on Consumer Health Information, discusses human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, the diseases it protects against, safety issues related to the vaccine, and steps CDC and FDA are taking to address safety concerns.

To access a ready-to-copy (PDF) version of "Addressing Questions About Gardasil," go to:
http://www.fda.gov/consumer/updates/gardasil092908.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version of "Addressing Questions About Gardasil," go to:
http://www.fda.gov/consumer/updates/gardasil092908.html
To access other publications in FDA's series on Consumer Health Information, go to: http://www.fda.gov/consumer
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7 CDC website spotlights current U.S. measles outbreaks on its "CDC Features" web section On October 20, information for the public about current measles outbreaks in the United States was posted on the CDC website's "CDC Features" web section (www.cdc.gov/Features).
To access the CDC feature titled "Update: Measles Outbreaks Continue in U.S." go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/Features/MeaslesUpdate
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8 For coalitions: 173 immunization coalitions have posted information on www.izcoalitions.org--is yours one of them? Since its 2002 launch date, IAC's izcoalitions.org website (http://www.izcoalitions.org) has posted information from 173 immunization coalitions. The site includes data from coalitions at all levels (local, state, regional, and national) and of all types, vaccine-specific as well as age-specific (childhood, adult, senior).

This online database allows health professionals, immunization advocates, parents, and others to contact specific coalitions to find resources, share ideas, and form strategic partnerships. Searches can be done by coalition name or geographic area.

Be sure your coalition is part of this powerful web-based networking tool by checking for your coalition's listing. If your coalition is not listed, sign up today. If your coalition is already displayed but information about your coalition has changed, be sure to update your listing to help us keep izcoalitions.org current and accurate.

To look for your coalition on the izcoalitions.org website, go to:
http://www.izcoalitions.org
If you have questions or difficulties updating your coalition's information or anything else, send an email to Janelle at janelle@immunize.org or call her at (651) 647-9009.
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9 October issue of CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter recently released CDC recently released the October issue of its monthly newsletter Immunization Works; it will soon be posted on the website of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD). The newsletter offers the immunization community information about current topics. The information is in the public domain and can be reproduced and circulated widely.

Some of the information in the October issue has already appeared in previous issues of IAC Express. Following are titles of articles IAC Express has already covered:
  • Protect Yourself, Your Patients, and Family from Flu
  • State-Specific Influenza Vaccination Coverage among Adults
  • Influenza Vaccination Coverage among Children 6-23 Months Old
  • Influenza Vaccination Coverage among Children Aged 6-59 Months
  • Hib Vaccine Shortage Will Continue to Mid-2009
  • More Teens Vaccinated, but Rates Fall Short of 2010 Goals
  • Updated Recommendations for Isolation of Persons with Mumps
  • Japan Approves Plan to Eliminate Measles
  • FDA Licenses New Vaccines
  • CDC's Pre-teen Vaccine Campaign Launches New PSAs
  • Video Warns Parents about the Dangers of Flu
  • Updated Multi-Vaccine VIS
  • ACIP Meeting
  • Mark Your Calendars for NIC
  • Clinical Vaccinology Course
Following is the text of an article we have not covered.


CDC RESPONDS TO SZILAGYI STUDY:
A study of influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) among children was recently published and can be found in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine (http://archpedi.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/162/10/943). The article, by Peter Szilagyi and colleagues indicates low (although not statistically significant) VE among children 6-59 months old. It is important to note that there are other studies, some using LAIV such as the Belshe study (http://www.preventinfluenza.org/newsletters/Belshe_NEJM.pdf), that show vaccine efficacy in the same population even when there was a strain mismatch. CDC has prepared a commentary (http://www.preventinfluenza.org/newsletters/InfluenzaVaccineStudy08.pdf) including key talking points, on this paper.

Issues of Immunization Works are posted on CDC's Vaccines & Immunizations website a few days after publication. To access the October issue, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/news/newsltrs/imwrks Click on the link titled "Oct" under the banner titled "2008 Newsletters Available Online."
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10.  MMWR reports on worldwide progress in introducing pneumococcal conjugate vaccine during 2000-2008 CDC published "Progress in Introduction of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine--Worldwide, 2000-2008" in the October 24 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.

IAC Express editor's note: The press summary below mentions that the Pneumococcal Awareness Council of Experts (PACE) and its partners are in the process of issuing a Global Call to Action urging access to pneumococcal vaccines for every person who needs them worldwide. A link to the Global Call to Action is given at the end of this IAC Express article.


Although much progress is being made in the use of pneumococcal vaccine worldwide, these life-saving vaccines are not reaching young children in developing countries that need them most.

Pneumococcal disease is a leading cause of childhood mortality globally. Low-income countries, where most of the disease occurs, will benefit most from introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. As of August 2008, 26 countries offered pneumococcal conjugate vaccine to children as part of national immunization programs or had the vaccine in widespread use; however, none of these countries is a low-income country. The safety and effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines justify its use, especially in low-income countries. Much is being done to address historic obstacles to vaccine introduction in both low- and middle-income countries. On October 24, the Pneumococcal Awareness Council of Experts and its partners will issue a Global Call to Action urging access to pneumococcal vaccines for every person who needs them worldwide.


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the MMWR article, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5742a2.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5742.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP recommendations), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html
To access PACE's Global Call to Action on Pneumococcal Disease Prevention, go to:
http://sabin.org/programs/pace/calltoaction.html
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11.  Webcast on pandemic influenza planning to take place on October 29 Department of Health and Human Services secretary Michael Leavitt will be a featured speaker on a webcast about the national pandemic influenza planning effort. The webcast is scheduled for October 29 at 1PM ET.

For complete details, go to:
http://www.pandemicflu.gov/news/panflu_webinar.html
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12.  Phacilitate Vaccine Forum scheduled for Washington, DC, on January 26-28, 2009 The Phacilitate Vaccine Forum is scheduled for Washington, DC, on January 26-28. Discount registration is available before October 31.

To access comprehensive information, go to:
http://www.phacilitate.co.uk/pages/washington_vac/register.html
Questions? Contact Phacilitate at team@phacilitate.co.uk
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Immunization Action Coalition  •  Saint Paul, MN
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.