Home
|
About IAC
|
Contact
|
A-Z Index
|
Donate
|
Shop
|
SUBSCRIBE
Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2008
Issue number 730: May 12, 2008
 
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. New: CDC's 2008 child and teen immunization schedules now in Spanish
  2. CDC's "Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases" course now in DVD and web-on-demand formats
  3. CDC materials help health departments support implementation of ACIP's adolescent vaccine recommendations
  4. CDC's shingles print ads help health professionals promote shingles vaccination to their patients
  5. MMWR includes May 1 report on U.S. measles outbreaks during January 1-April 25, 2008
  6. CDC alerts members of the media that the National Influenza Vaccine Summit will be held May 12-13 in Atlanta
  7. For parents: "What to Expect Guide to Immunizations" and "Immunizations for Babies" are in English and Spanish
  8. Information about and resources related to May 19 observance of World Hepatitis Day available online
  9. New: CDC publishes ACIP's 2008 recommendations on human rabies prevention as an MMWR Early Release
  10. Summary Report from the February 2008 ACIP meeting now online
  11. Important: Be sure to give influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season--through the spring months
  12. AIM Provider Toolkit is a resource guide for immunization in Michigan
  13. MMWR reports on worldwide progress toward interrupting wild poliovirus transmission during January 2007-April 2008
  14. International Rotavirus Symposium scheduled for June 3-4 in Istanbul
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 730: May 12, 2008
1.  New: CDC's 2008 child and teen immunization schedules now in Spanish

On May 1, the CDC website posted Spanish-language versions of its three 2008 immunization schedules for children and teens: "Recommended Immunization Schedule for Persons Aged 0-6 Years," "Recommended Immunization Schedule for Persons Aged 7-18 Years," and "Catch-up Immunization Schedule for Persons Aged 4 Months-18 Years Who Start Late or Who Are More Than 1 Month Behind."

To access them, go to http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/schedules/child-schedule.htm#printable Click on the link titled "2008 Schedules in Spanish."

To access the English-language versions in a variety of formats, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/schedules/child-schedule.htm#printable Click on the link titled "2008 Schedules."

Back to top
   
2 CDC's "Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases" course now in DVD and web-on-demand formats

Updated and released on May 1, the professional-education course "Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases" is now available in DVD and web-on-demand formats. Continuing-education credit expires on March 31, 2009. Note: In previous years, the course was delivered by satellite broadcast. In 2007, it was decided that going forward, it would be available only on DVD and by Internet.

For comprehensive information--which includes links to a video on influenza vaccination of healthcare providers; ordering and downloading information for the course textbook (the second printing of the Pink Book); textbook updates; and additional resources and slides--go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ed/epivac

Back to top
   
3 CDC materials help health departments support implementation of ACIP's adolescent vaccine recommendations

CDC has created a set of materials to help state and local health departments support the implementation of ACIP's adolescent vaccine recommendations. Available in English and Spanish, the materials refer to meningococcal disease and pertussis (whooping cough). They are, however, provided as templates that can be customized to include human papillomavirus (HPV) and other recommended vaccines.

Materials titled "It's their turn!" are intended for parents of adolescents; those titled "It's my turn!" are intended for pre-teens and adolescents.

To access the materials, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/spec-grps/preteens-adol/prof-matls/state-materials.htm

CDC encourages health departments and organizations to use the materials. Users interested in customizing the materials to their state can contact the Meningitis and Vaccine Preventable Diseases Branch at (800) 232-4636.

Back to top
   
4 CDC's shingles print ads help health professionals promote shingles vaccination to their patients

The CDC website recently posted four full-color print ads that health professionals can use to educate their older patients about shingles disease and vaccine. Three of them measure 8.5" x 11"; they are "Shingles Fact Sheet," "Older Adult Fact Sheet (includes information about pneumococcal, influenza, and Tdap vaccines, as well as shingles vaccine), and "Shingles Personal Story." "Shingles Poster" measures 18" x 24".

To access the shingles print ads, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/shingles/print-ads.htm and click on the pertinent link.

Back to top
   
5 MMWR includes May 1 report on U.S. measles outbreaks during January 1-April 25, 2008

CDC published "Measles--United States, January 1-April 25, 2008" in the May 9 MMWR. Previously, the article was available only in electronic format as an MMWR Early Release (published May 1).

To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5718a5.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5718.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

Back to top
   
6 CDC alerts members of the media that the National Influenza Vaccine Summit will be held May 12-13 in Atlanta

On May 7, CDC issued a media advisory announcing that the 2008 meeting of the National Influenza Vaccine Summit is scheduled for May 12-13 in Atlanta. Summit participants will meet to identify influenza vaccination issues experienced during the 2007-08 influenza vaccination season and develop recommendations and activities for the 2008-09 season, focusing on vaccine supply and distribution issues.

Members of the media who wish to attend should contact Curtis Allen at (404) 639-8487 or cea6@cdc.gov

Members of the media are asked to check-in at the conference registration table. There will be a media table with telephone lines for print reporters and an area for cameras with sound connections for broadcast media.

To access the media advisory, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/2008/a080507.htm

Back to top
   
7 For parents: "What to Expect Guide to Immunizations" and "Immunizations for Babies" are in English and Spanish

Two online immunization resources have recently become available for parents of young children. Both are available for downloading in English and Spanish. Details follow:

(1) "What to Expect Guide to Immunizations," is a detailed, well written, and well organized 20-page guide that explains how vaccines work, makes the case for immunization, answers questions parents frequently ask about vaccination, gives tips on handling children's tears and fears, and presents information about each vaccine children ages 0-6 years are recommended to receive. It is published by the What to Expect Foundation, the nonprofit arm of the popular "What to Expect When You're Expecting" series of prenatal and parenting books.

To download the English or Spanish versions of "What to Expect Guide to Immunizations," go to http://www.whattoexpect.org/news/immunizations and click on the pertinent link.

(2) "Recommended Immunizations for Babies, 2008," a colorful one-page chart, lists all the vaccines babies ages 0-15 months are recommended to receive and specifies the ages at which each should be given. Developed by CDC, it is adapted from IAC's "Immunizations for Babies--A Guide for Parents" and CDC's "Recommended Immunization Schedule for Persons Aged 0-6 Years, 2008."

To access the English version of "Recommended Immunizations for Babies," go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/spec-grps/infants/downloads/rec-iz-babies.pdf

To access the Spanish version of "Recommended Immunizations for Babies," go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/spec-grps/infants/downloads/rec-iz-babies-sp.pdf

Back to top
   
8 Information about and resources related to May 19 observance of World Hepatitis Day available online

The first annual World Hepatitis Day (WHD) will be observed on May 19. The day has been launched in response to the concern that though 500 million people worldwide are currently infected with hepatitis B or C, the public is ignorant of the magnitude of these diseases. The great majority of those infected are unaware of the fact, and the world public is largely uninformed about infection risks. World Hepatitis Day is a worldwide patient-led initiative. It is coordinated by the newly established World Hepatitis Alliance in Geneva, Switzerland.

The National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable has posted documents regarding WHD in the U.S. on its website.

For background information on WHD, go to: http://www.nvhr.org/resources.htm

For promotional materials, including website banners, a press release, and information about submitting a photo or patient story, go to: http://www.nvhr.org/NVHR_World_Hepatitis_Day.htm

On May 19, the official WHD website will become fully operational. Go to http://www.aminumber12.org on or after that date to view photos and stories from around the world.

Back to top
   
9 New: CDC publishes ACIP's 2008 recommendations on human rabies prevention as an MMWR Early Release

On May 7, CDC published "Human Rabies Prevention--United States, 2008: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices" as an MMWR Early Release. CDC publishes the web-based MMWR Early Release for the immediate release of important public health information. The recommendations will be published in the standard MMWR format in the near future.

The summary section of the recommendations is reprinted below.


These recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) update the previous recommendations on human rabies prevention (CDC. Human rabies prevention--United States, 1999: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. MMWR 1999;48 [No. RR-1]) and reflect the status of rabies and antirabies biologics in the United States. This statement (1) provides updated information on human and animal rabies epidemiology; (2) summarizes the evidence regarding the effectiveness/efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety of rabies biologics; (3) presents new information on the cost-effectiveness of rabies postexposure prophylaxis; (4) presents recommendations for rabies postexposure and pre-exposure prophylaxis; and (5) presents information regarding treatment considerations for human rabies patients.

These recommendations involve no substantial changes to the recommended approach for rabies postexposure or pre-exposure prophylaxis. ACIP recommends that prophylaxis for the prevention of rabies in humans exposed to rabies virus should include prompt and thorough wound cleansing followed by passive rabies immunization with human rabies immune globulin (HRIG) and vaccination with a cell culture rabies vaccine. For persons who have never been vaccinated against rabies, postexposure antirabies vaccination should always include administration of both passive antibody (HRIG) and vaccine (human diploid cell vaccine [HDCV] or purified chick embryo cell vaccine [PCECV]). Persons who have ever previously received complete vaccination regimens (pre-exposure or postexposure) with a cell culture vaccine or persons who have been vaccinated with other types of vaccines and have previously had a documented rabies virus neutralizing antibody titer should receive only 2 doses of vaccine: one on day 0 (as soon as the exposure is recognized and administration of vaccine can be arranged) and the second on day 3. HRIG is administered only once (i.e., at the beginning of antirabies prophylaxis) to previously unvaccinated persons to provide immediate, passive, rabies virus neutralizing antibody coverage until the patient responds to HDCV or PCECV by actively producing antibodies. A regimen of 5 1-mL doses of HDCV or PCECV should be administered intramuscularly to previously unvaccinated persons. The first dose of the 5-dose course should be administered as soon as possible after exposure (day 0). Additional doses should then be administered on days 3, 7, 14, and 28 after the first vaccination. Rabies pre-exposure vaccination should include three 1.0-mL injections of HDCV or PCECV administered intramuscularly (one injection per day on days 0, 7, and 21 or 28).

Modifications were made to the language of the guidelines to clarify the recommendations and better specify the situations in which rabies post- and pre-exposure prophylaxis should be administered. No new rabies biologics are presented, and no changes were made to the vaccination schedules. However, rabies vaccine adsorbed (RVA, Bioport Corporation) is no longer available for rabies postexposure or pre-exposure prophylaxis, and intradermal pre-exposure prophylaxis is no longer recommended because it is not available in the United States.


To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the Early Release, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/rr/rr57e507.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version of the Early Release, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr57e507a1.htm

Back to top
   
10.  Summary Report from the February 2008 ACIP meeting now online

The CDC website recently posted the Summary Report of ACIP's February 27-28 meeting. To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the report, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/acip/downloads/min-feb08.pdf

Back to top
   
11.  Important: Be sure to give influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season--through the spring months

Influenza is currently circulating, and vaccination should continue through the spring months. Visit the following websites often to find the information you need to keep vaccinating. Both are continually updated with the latest resources.

The National Influenza Vaccine Summit website at http://www.preventinfluenza.org

CDC's Seasonal Flu web section at http://www.cdc.gov/flu

Back to top
   
12.  AIM Provider Toolkit is a resource guide for immunization in Michigan

The Alliance for Immunization in Michigan (AIM) recently announced the availability of its 2008 Providers Immunization Toolkit for Children & Adults. The toolkit is a resource guide containing the most current standards of practice, forms, and methodologies for immunization in Michigan.

To access the online version, go to: http://www.aimtoolkit.org/adult_immun.htm Click on the colored tab at the top of the page that corresponds to the information you are seeking (e.g. "Children," "Adolescents," and so forth).

For Michigan immunization providers: To order one free print copy, go to http://www.aimtoolkit.org Scroll down to the bottom of the screen and click on the link that follows "To order your free copy of the kit."

Back to top
   
13.  MMWR reports on worldwide progress toward interrupting wild poliovirus transmission during January 2007-April 2008

CDC published "Progress Toward Interruption of Wild Poliovirus Transmission--Worldwide, January 2007-April 2008" in the May 9 MMWR. Portions of a press summary of the article are reprinted below.


The number of countries that have never succeeded in interrupting wild poliovirus (WPV) transmission [has been] reduced to four (Afghanistan, India, Nigeria, and Pakistan) . . . .

This article summarized progress toward polio eradication in 2007. An accelerated effort during 20072008 toward elimination of WPV transmission has expanded use of type 1 monovalent oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) (mOPV1) in immunization campaigns to preferentially eliminate type 1 WPV (WPV1) transmission before type 3 WPV (WPV3); WPV1 is more likely to cause paralytic disease and have a wider geographic spread than WPV3. Type 2 WPV (WPV2) circulation was last observed in October 1999. In 2007, the overall number of WPV cases declined to 1,308 in 2007.

The number of WPV1 cases has been reduced 81 percent to 321 in 2007; this in large part is because of substantial progress toward the interruption of WPV1 circulation in India, which is anticipated in 2008. Progress in other countries with poliovirus circulation has been made, but with ongoing limitations in reaching all children in vaccination efforts; WPV1 elimination will continue to be preferentially targeted in those countries as well.


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5718a4.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5718.pdf

Back to top
   
14.  International Rotavirus Symposium scheduled for June 3-4 in Istanbul

The eighth annual International Rotavirus Symposium will be held in Istanbul on June 3-4. The event will provide updates on clinical trials of new rotavirus vaccines, early post-marketing data on vaccine impact and safety, issues in vaccine policy and introduction, and other relevant topics.

For comprehensive information, including a preliminary program, go to: http://www.rotavirus2008.com

Back to top
   
Immunization Action Coalition  •  Saint Paul, MN
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.