Home
|
About IAC
|
Contact
|
A-Z Index
|
Donate
|
Shop
|
SUBSCRIBE
Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2008
Issue number 715: March 10, 2008
 
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. CDC posts Q&As about new multi-vaccine VIS1
  2. CDC offers flyer about the correct use of Hib vaccine during the current shortage
  3. CDC publishes correction to catch-up immunization schedule
  4. CDC answers questions from the media about vaccine safety
  5. New online Influenza Vaccine Algorithm can aid clinicians in determining the number and timing of child vaccine doses
  6. New influenza resources available
  7. IAC updates three print educational pieces
  8. MMWR publishes article about the cost of vaccinating refugees
  9. MMWR publishes article about the cost of polio infections in a camp of U.S.-bound refugees
  10. Errata: MMWR publishes corrections to the report "Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Children 5 Years After Conjugate Vaccine Introduction—Eight States, 1998–2005"
  11. Important: Be sure to give influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season--from now through spring
  12. Reminder: National Conference on Immunization & Health Coalitions will be held May 21-23, in San Francisco
  13. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality releases 2007 reports on national healthcare quality and disparities
  14. On-site course, Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases, scheduled for Atlanta on April 15-16
  15. Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America's Annual Scientific Meeting scheduled for April 5-8, in Orlando
  16. World TB Day is March 24
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 715: March 10, 2008
1.  CDC posts Q&As about new multi-vaccine VIS

On January 30, 2008, CDC posted a multi-vaccine VIS on its website. This new VIS may be used in place of individual VISs whenever routine birth through 6-month vaccines (DTaP, IPV, Hib, hepatitis B, PCV, and rotavirus) are administered, or when combination vaccines are used (e.g., Pediarix or Comvax).

The multi-vaccine VIS is available from the IAC website at http://www.immunize.org/vis/vis_multi1.pdf and the CDC website at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/downloads/vis-multi.pdf

Because many healthcare professionals have had questions about using this new resource, CDC has added a "Frequently Asked Questions" page to its website at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/multi-vis-faqs.htm If you have a question about the new VIS that is not covered in the above, please email crw4@cdc.gov

Back to top
   
2 CDC offers flyer about the correct use of Hib vaccine during the current shortage

CDC has developed a flyer for clinicians regarding the proper use of Hib vaccine during the current shortage. The text of the flyer reads:


UPDATE February 16, 2008
THIS NOTICE MUST GO TO ANYONE WHO GIVES VACCINES

Due to temporary Hib Vaccine shortage:
Do not give Hib vaccine booster dose to healthy children aged 12-15 months.(Continue to give to high-risk children: those with asplenia, sickle cell disease, HIV, other immune syndromes, or who are Alaskan or Native American--boost as usual)

Now:
Keep track of those children who did NOT get the booster dose.

Later:
Plan to vaccinate them when supply improves.

Now:
Continue regular vaccination for infants under 12 months. Make sure the vaccine used is not from recalled Merck PedvaxHIB or COMVAX lots.

For more information: www.cdc.gov/vaccines


To download the flyer, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/shortages/downloads/hib-flyer-022008.pdf

Other information about the Hib shortage can be accessed at
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/shortages/default.htm#hib

Back to top
   
3 CDC publishes correction to catch-up immunization schedule

On March 5, CDC issued a correction to the "Recommended Immunization Schedules for Persons Aged 0-18 Years, U.S. 2008." The correction is in the "Catch-up Immunization Schedule for Persons Aged 4 Months to 18 Years Who Start Late or Who Are More than 1 Month Behind."

The entry for HPV vaccine catch-up was changed to indicate that the third dose needs to be administered not earlier than 24 weeks from the first dose. The minimum intervals between dose 1 and dose 2 as well as between dose 2 and dose 3 remain unchanged.

The corrected catch-up schedule may be found at:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/schedules/child-schedule.htm#catchup

The official U.S. immunization schedule for children and teens is available in its entirety at
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/schedules/child-schedule.htm

Back to top
   
4 CDC answers questions from the media about vaccine safety

On March 6, CDC hosted a telebriefing about the public health response to childhood vaccine safety. The call was intended to answer some of questions and misstatements that have arisen in the media in response to a recent vaccine injury compensation case. As discussion of individual claims filed under the Childhood Vaccine Injury Act is prohibited without the written consent of the person who submitted the information, the experts on the call did not discuss specifics of the case, but rather provided general information on related terms and concepts, especially mitochondrial diseases and disorders.

To access the transcript of this call, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/transcripts/2008/t080307.htm

To read a March 3 statement by the Health Resources and Services Administration on autism and the Vaccine Injury Program, go to:
http://newsroom.hrsa.gov/releases/2008/vaccinestatement.htm

For information about the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, visit http://www.hrsa.gov/vaccinecompensation

To read about the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, Office of Special Masters, visit
http://www.uscfc.uscourts.gov/vaccine-programoffice-special-masters

Back to top
   
5 New online Influenza Vaccine Algorithm can aid clinicians in determining the number and timing of child vaccine doses

The American Academy of Pediatrics and the Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition have developed an online, interactive Influenza Vaccine Algorithm to help healthcare professionals determine the number and timing of vaccine doses needed to protect patients age six months to nine years.

To access the algorithm program, go to:
http://www.preventchildhoodinfluenza.org/resource/algorithm.php

To explore other resources from the Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition, visit their website at
http://www.preventchildhoodinfluenza.org

Back to top
   
6 New influenza resources available

CDC recently added two resources to its Seasonal Flu web section:

  • "The 2007-2008 flu season"
  • "Influenza antiviral drug resistance"

To access these resources, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/whatsnew.htm and click on the pertinent link.

The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) is offering a webcast series on pandemic influenza, with the first seminar scheduled for March 13, at 2:00 PM ET. These live discussions are intended to help state planners with the next round of pandemic influenza planning. Questions can be submitted by email in advance of the webcast. For more information, go to: http://www.pandemicflu.gov/news/panflu_webinar.html

To access a broad range of continually updated information on seasonal influenza, avian influenza, pandemic influenza, and swine influenza from CDC, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/flu

To access more information on pandemic and avian influenza from HHS, go to: http://www.pandemicflu.gov/index.html

Back to top
   
7 IAC updates three print educational pieces

IAC recently revised three of its print educational resources, "Vaccine Administration Record for Adults," "Questions Parents Ask About Baby Shots," and "Guide to Contraindications and Precautions to Commonly Used Vaccines."

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the updated "Vaccine Administration Record for Adults," go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2023.pdf

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the updated "Questions Parents Ask About Baby Shots," go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4025.pdf

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the updated "Guide to Contraindications and Precautions to Commonly Used Vaccines," go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3072a.pdf

Back to top
   
8 MMWR publishes article about the cost of vaccinating refugees

CDC published "Cost of Vaccinating Refugees Overseas Versus After Arrival in the United States, 2005" in the March 7 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.


A recent study conducted by CDC's Immigrant, Refugee and Migrant Health Branch found that vaccinating refugees overseas could result in a significant cost reduction and savings, prevent importation of disease into the U.S., and reduce human suffering. This study compared the costs of vaccinating refugees overseas versus after their arrival in the United States. The results suggest that vaccinating refugees in the United States would have cost three times as much as overseas, approximately $26.0 million versus $7.7 million. In addition to cost savings, overseas vaccination has the potential to reduce importation of diseases, thereby protecting the health of the U.S. population and reducing costs associated with response to outbreaks. To achieve public health cost savings, routine overseas vaccination of U.S.-bound refugees should be considered.


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5709a2.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5709.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

Back to top
   
9 MMWR publishes article about the cost of polio infections in a camp of U.S.-bound refugees

CDC published "U.S.-Incurred Costs of Wild Poliovirus Infections in a Camp with U.S.-Bound Refugees--Kenya, 2006" in the March 7 issue of MMWR. The first paragraph is reprinted below.


Routine predeparture vaccinations are not required for U.S.-bound refugees, a policy that potentially leaves U.S. communities vulnerable to importation of vaccine-preventable diseases. During October-December 2006, an outbreak of poliomyelitis associated with wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) occurred in a camp occupied by refugees awaiting resettlement to the United States. This report describes the costs of domestic and international activities borne by U.S. federal and state governments, U.S.-funded organizations, and U.S. voluntary agencies during their response to this outbreak. Requiring predeparture polio vaccinations for U.S.-bound refugees might reduce the risk for poliovirus importation and reduce the costs associated with responses to polio outbreaks among refugees.


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5709a3.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5709.pdf

Back to top
   
10.  Errata: MMWR publishes corrections to the report "Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Children 5 Years After Conjugate Vaccine Introduction—Eight States, 1998–2005"

CDC published "Errata: Vol. 57, No. 6" in the March 7 issue of MMWR. This article refers to a report in the February 15 issue of MMWR, found at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5706a2.htm The text of the errata follows in its entirety.


In the report, "Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Children 5 Years After Conjugate Vaccine Introduction--Eight States, 1998–2005," on page 145, the first two complete sentences in the second column should read as follows: Among children born in 2001, 89% and 68% received >=1 dose and >=3 doses, respectively. Among children born in 2005, 95% and 84% received >=1 dose and >=3 doses, respectively.


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5709a8.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5709.pdf

Back to top
   
11.  Important: Be sure to give influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season--from now through spring

Influenza is currently circulating, and vaccination should continue from now until May. Visit the following websites often to find the information you need to keep vaccinating. Both are continually updated with the latest resources.

The National Influenza Vaccine Summit website at http://www.preventinfluenza.org

CDC's Seasonal Flu web section at http://www.cdc.gov/flu

Back to top
   
12.  Reminder: National Conference on Immunization & Health Coalitions will be held May 21-23, in San Francisco

The eighth National Conference on Immunization & Health Coalitions will be held in San Francisco on May 21-23, 2008. The deadline for standard registration is May 15.

To access comprehensive conference information, go to:
http://www.sfimmunize.org/page2.html

Back to top
   
13.  Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality releases 2007 reports on national healthcare quality and disparities

For the fifth year in a row, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality has produced the National Healthcare Quality Report and the National Healthcare Disparities Report. These reports measure trends in effectiveness of care, patient safety, timeliness of care, patient centeredness, and efficiency of care.

These reports are mandated by Congress and draw on more than three dozen databases, most sponsored by federal health agencies. Some of the information is related to immunization.

The Quality and Disparities Reports are available online at www.ahrq.gov/qual/qrdr07.htm, by calling (800) 358-9295, or by sending an email to ahrqpubs@ahrq.hhs.gov

Back to top
   
14.  On-site course, Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases, scheduled for Atlanta on April 15-16

A live two-day "Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases" course will be held in Atlanta on April 15-16, at CDC.

This two-day course provides the most current information available in the constantly changing field of immunization. It offers a comprehensive overview of immunization; general recommendations; and vaccine storage, handling, and administration. The course will also highlight one or more emerging issues in the field.

Space is limited, so please register early. Continuing education credits will be provided. For registration information, download the course brochure found at
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ed/downloads/atl-brochure2008.pdf

For more information, please contact Laverne Graham at (404) 639-8225.

Back to top
   
15.  Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America's Annual Scientific Meeting scheduled for April 5-8, in Orlando

The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America's (SHEA) Annual Scientific Meeting will be held April 5-8, in Orlando, Florida.

This year's SHEA conference will include sessions on employee health and vaccination, pediatrics and the autism/vaccine debate, and the emergence of non-vaccine serogroups in pediatrics. SHEA received a record number of abstracts this year, and the meeting will feature more than 300 presentations of up-to-date research.

For more information on the conference, go to:
https://registration.expoexchange.com/showshe081/default.aspx

For more information about SHEA, visit their website at http://www.shea-online.org

Back to top
   
16.  World TB Day is March 24

Tuberculosis takes more than 1.6 million lives each year and drug-resistant TB is a growing threat around the world, with more than 45 countries (including the United States) reporting extensive drug-resistant TB.

World TB Day is March 24. Go to the Stop TB Partnership website at http://www.stoptb.org/events/world_tb_day/2008 to download educational materials and plan World TB Day activities.

On March 13, the Global Health Council, the Aeras Global TB Vaccine Foundation, and the American Thoracic Society are sponsoring a Congressional briefing on TB issues and research. For information on attending, go to: http://www.globalhealth.org/news/article/9695

Back to top
   
Immunization Action Coalition  •  1573 Selby Ave  •  St. Paul, MN 55104
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.