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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2007
Issue number 696: November 26, 2007
 
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. Important: CDC publishes expanded ACIP recommendations for FluMist use in children age 2-4 years, as well as other changes in the vaccine's use
  2. CDC announces availability of an additional injectable influenza vaccine
  3. Maine updates its mumps vaccination recommendations in response to mumps outbreak
  4. MMWR notifies readers that November 26-December 2 is National Influenza Vaccination Week
  5. Adult Immunization Schedule available in several more formats
  6. Check your email: Wednesday's IAC Express Extra Edition will keep you up to date on activities and resources for National Immunization Vaccination Week
  7. Important: Be sure to administer influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season--from fall 2007 through spring 2008
  8. VIS for nasal-spray influenza vaccine now available in Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Tagalog, and Vietnamese
  9. November issue of CDC's Immunization Works e-newsletter covers seasonal influenza and several other topics
  10. CDC updates "Vaccine Management," an essential document on vaccine storage and handling
  11. NFID's S.T.O.P. Meningitis toolkit offers resources for immunizing adolescents and young adults
  12. CDC's plans December 13 satellite broadcast and webcast on VPD surveillance
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 696: November 26, 2007
1.  Important: CDC publishes expanded ACIP recommendations for FluMist use in children age 2-4 years, as well as other changes in the vaccine's use

CDC published "Notice to Readers: Expansion of Use of Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine (FluMist) to Children Aged 2-4 Years and Other FluMist Changes for the 2007-08 Influenza Season" in the November 23 issue of MMWR. The article is reprinted below in its entirety, excluding references.


On September 19, 2007, MedImmune Vaccines (Gaithersburg, Maryland) received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to expand the use of FluMist, a live, attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), to children aged 2-4 years (i.e., 24-49 months). FluMist is an intranasally administered influenza vaccine that was first licensed by the FDA in 2003 for healthy, nonpregnant persons aged 5-49 years. Expanding the age indications to include healthy children aged 2-4 years provides another influenza vaccination option for young children. In granting the new approval, FDA emphasized that FluMist is not approved for vaccination of children aged <2 years or adults aged >49 years, and that FluMist safety has not been established in persons with underlying medical conditions predisposing them to influenza-related complications. In addition, FluMist should not be administered to persons with asthma or children aged <5 years with recurrent wheezing.

New Recommendation for FluMist

In a randomized trial published in 2007, FluMist and trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV) were compared among children aged 6-59 months. Children with medically diagnosed or treated wheezing within 42 days before enrollment, or a history of severe asthma, were excluded from this study. FluMist had a 55% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 45%-63%) greater efficacy compared with TIV in preventing culture-confirmed influenza illness.

In the trial, among children aged 6-23 months, wheezing that required bronchodilator therapy or that was associated with significant respiratory symptoms occurred in 5.9% of FluMist recipients, compared with 3.8% of those who received TIV (risk ratio [RR] = 1.5, CI = 1.2-2.1). Wheezing was not greater among children aged 24-59 months who received FluMist. In a previous randomized placebo-controlled safety trial among children aged 12 months-17 years, an elevated risk for asthma events (RR = 4.06, CI = 1.29-17.86) was noted among 728 children aged 18-35 months who received FluMist; of the 16 children with asthma-related events, none required hospitalization, and elevated risks for asthma were not observed in other age groups.

During 2006-2007, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) influenza vaccine workgroup reviewed data on the use of FluMist among children aged 2-4 years. On the basis of these data, expert opinion of the workgroup members, and consultation with representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics and immunization safety experts, the workgroup revised recommendations for use of LAIV to include children aged 2-4 years, and presented its recommendations to ACIP. On October 24, 2007, ACIP recommended that either LAIV or TIV can be used to vaccinate healthy non-pregnant persons aged 2-49 years. For the purposes of this recommendation, healthy persons were defined as persons who do not have an underlying medical condition that predisposes them to influenza complications. ACIP also approved use of FluMist for healthy persons aged 2-18 years under the federal Vaccines for Children (VFC) program.

Although FDA licensure of FluMist excluded children aged 2-4 years with a history of asthma or recurrent wheezing, the precise risk, if any, of wheezing caused by FluMist among these children is unknown because experience with FluMist among these young children is limited. Young children might not have a history of recurrent wheezing if their exposure to respiratory viruses has been limited because of their age. Certain children might have a history of wheezing with respiratory illnesses but have not had asthma diagnosed. The ACIP influenza vaccine workgroup, with advice from consultants, developed the following screening recommendations to assist persons who administer influenza vaccines in providing the appropriate vaccine for children aged 2-4 years.

Clinicians and immunization programs should screen for possible reactive airways diseases when considering use of FluMist for children aged 2-4 years, and should avoid use of this vaccine in children with asthma or a recent wheezing episode. Healthcare providers should consult the medical record, when available, to identify children aged 2-4 years with asthma or recurrent wheezing that might indicate asthma. In addition, to identify children who might be at greater risk for asthma and possibly at increased risk for wheezing after receiving LAIV, parents or caregivers of children aged 2-4 years should be asked: "In the past 12 months, has a healthcare provider ever told you that your child had wheezing or asthma?" Children whose parents or caregivers answer "yes" to this question and children who have asthma or who had a wheezing episode noted in the medical record within the past 12 months, should not receive FluMist. TIV is available for use in children with asthma or possible reactive airways diseases.

Other Changes in FluMist Use for 2007-08

Three other changes in the use of FluMist and its 2007-08 formulation should be noted; the amount of vaccine administered, the temperature at which FluMist is shipped and stored after delivery to the end-user, and the minimum interval between doses have changed compared with the 2006-07 influenza season formulation. First, FluMist is now supplied in a prefilled, single-use sprayer containing 0.2 mL of vaccine instead of the previous 0.5 mL dose. Persons administering FluMist should spray 0.1 mL (i.e., half of the total sprayer contents) into the first nostril while the recipient is in an upright position. An attached dose-divider clip should then be removed from the sprayer and the second half of the dose administered into the other nostril. Second, FluMist is now approved to be shipped to end users at 35 degrees F-46 degrees F (2 degrees C-8 degrees C) instead of being shipped and stored frozen. FluMist should be stored at 35 degrees F-46 degrees F (2 degrees C-8 degrees C) upon receipt, and can remain at that temperature until the expiration date is reached. Third, the recommended interval from the first to the second dose in children requiring 2 doses has changed from a minimum of 6 weeks to a minimum of 4 weeks, the same interval recommended between doses for TIV.

Regardless of the vaccine used, ACIP, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American Academy of Family Physicians recommend that children aged <9 years who have not previously been administered an influenza vaccine should receive 2 doses separated by 4 or more weeks in the initial year. Children aged <9 years who did not receive the recommended second dose of influenza vaccine in the initial year that they received influenza vaccine should receive 2 doses separated by 4 or more weeks before or during the next influenza season. This recommendation applies only to the influenza season that follows the first season that a child aged <9 years receives influenza vaccine. Children aged <9 years who are being vaccinated two or more seasons after receiving an influenza vaccine for the first time should receive a single annual dose, regardless of the number of doses administered previously. Additional information is available from the manufacturer's package insert and MedImmune Vaccines, telephone (877) 358-6478.


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5646a4.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5646.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

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2 CDC announces availability of an additional injectable influenza vaccine

CDC published "Notice to Readers: Availability of Additional Trivalent Inactivated Influenza Vaccine for Adults (Afluria)" in the November 23 issue of MMWR. The article is reprinted below in its entirety, excluding references.


On September 28, 2007, CSL Biotherapies, Inc., (King of Prussia, Pennsylvania) received approval from the Food and Drug Administration for use of Afluria, a trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) administered intramuscularly in persons aged >=18 years. Afluria can be used for any adult influenza vaccine indication.

The addition of Afluria brings to six (five TIVs and one live, attenuated influenza vaccine) the number of seasonal influenza vaccines licensed for the U.S. market. CDC estimates that manufacturers of the six vaccines will supply a record 132 million doses of influenza vaccine for the 2007-08 influenza season.

Afluria is available in a 0.5 mL preservative-free, single-dose, prefilled syringe and in a 5 mL multidose vial containing 10 doses. Thimerosal, a mercury derivative, is added as a preservative to the multidose vial; each 0.5 mL dose contains 24.5 micrograms of mercury. Additional information is available from the manufacturer's package insert and CSL Biotherapies, Inc., telephone (888) 435-8633.


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5646a5.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5646.pdf

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3 Maine updates its mumps vaccination recommendations in response to mumps outbreak

On November 19, the Maine Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) issued a press release announcing that the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention has updated the state's recommendations for mumps vaccination in response to a mumps outbreak in the state. Portions of the press release are reprinted below.

Also on November 19, the website of the Maine DHHS posted a health alert containing a broad spectrum of information for healthcare professionals. The link to the health alert is given at the end of this IAC Express article.


With four people being identified with a mumps infection over the past month and results of tests on between one and two dozen additional patients with the suspected illness pending, the Department of Health and Human Services' Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Dora Ann Mills said that vaccination recommendations for mumps are being updated.

Maine now has seven people who have been diagnosed with the illness, ranging in age from the late teens to the late 50s. They reside in various towns in Southern and Central Maine.

"Because this outbreak has spread, we are updating vaccination recommendations, especially among children, college and university students, and hospital workers," Mills said. "These are indicated priority populations for vaccine from experiences in other outbreaks. . . ."

For kindergarten through 12th grade schools, the Maine CDC is recommending:
  • All vaccine records need to be reviewed and updated.
  • For those children who are not updated with their MMR vaccine, a letter should be given to the parents notifying them that Maine is currently experiencing an outbreak of mumps, and that if the infection is detected in their school their child will needed to be excluded for at least 18 days.

For colleges and universities, the Maine CDC is recommending:

  • All vaccine records need to be reviewed and updated.
  • All college and university students should have documentation of two doses of MMR, rather than the previously required one dose. Most students would have had two doses as part of their routine childhood vaccinations.

For hospital healthcare workers with direct patient care, the Maine CDC is recommending:

  • All hospital healthcare workers in hospitals who have direct patient contact should have their vaccine records reviewed and updated.
  • Adequate mumps vaccination for those born during or after 1957 now consists of two doses of MMR, rather than the previously required one dose.
  • Adequate mumps vaccination for those born before 1957 now consists of one dose of MMR, rather than no doses as previously required. . .

Besides additional vaccinations, the Maine CDC will also be recommending those who are infected to be isolated for nine days after the onset of illness and those who are non-immune and who are exposed to be isolated for about 18 days after the last exposure.

For More Information


To access the complete press release, click here.

To access the health alert, go to:
http://www.maine.gov/dhhs/boh/documents/2007PHADV016.pdf

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4 MMWR notifies readers that November 26-December 2 is National Influenza Vaccination Week

CDC published "Notice to Readers: National Influenza Vaccination Week--November 26-December 2, 2007" in the November 23 issue of MMWR. The article is reprinted below in its entirety, excluding a figure and references.


To help raise awareness regarding the importance of obtaining influenza vaccination throughout the entire influenza season, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Influenza Vaccine Summit, CDC, and other partners are conducting activities during the second annual National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW), November 26-December 2.

Influenza vaccination coverage in all groups recommended for vaccination remains suboptimal. Despite the timing of the peak of influenza disease, administration of vaccine decreases substantially after November. According to results from the National Health Interview Survey regarding the two most recent influenza seasons, approximately 84% of all influenza vaccinations were administered during September-November. Among persons aged >=65 years, the percentage of September-November vaccinations was even higher, at 92% (CDC, unpublished data, 2007). Because many persons recommended for vaccination remain unvaccinated at the end of November, CDC is encouraging public-health partners and healthcare providers to conduct vaccination clinics and other activities that promote influenza vaccination during NIVW and throughout the remainder of the influenza season.

Each year, on average, approximately 15-60 million persons in the United States are infected with influenza virus; an estimated 200,000 persons are hospitalized from influenza complications, and an estimated 36,000 persons die from those complications. Influenza vaccination is the best way to prevent influenza and potentially severe complications. CDC recommends that anyone who wants to reduce their risk for influenza infection should be vaccinated every influenza season. Annual vaccination is particularly important for the following groups.

(1) persons at high risk for influenza-related complications and severe disease, including:
  • children aged 6-59 months,
  • pregnant women,
  • persons aged >=50 years,
  • persons of any age with certain chronic medical conditions; and

(2) persons who live with or care for persons at high risk, including:

  • household contacts and caregivers of persons in the above groups,
  • household contacts and caregivers of children aged <6 months (these children also are at high risk for influenza-related complications but are too young to receive influenza vaccination), and
  • healthcare workers.


The time to receive influenza vaccination starts when vaccine becomes available in the local community and continues into January or later, when the influenza season typically peaks. Throughout NIVW, CDC will be highlighting the importance of influenza vaccination for persons at high risk, their close contacts, and all those who want to be protected from influenza. CDC, Families Fighting Flu, and other partners also have designated Tuesday, November 27, as Children's Flu Vaccination Day to put a special focus on the importance of vaccinating children at high risk and their close contacts.

NIVW posters and other influenza educational materials are available to download for local printing and distribution at http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/flugallery Other influenza-related tools and information for healthcare professionals and patients are available at http://www.cdc.gov/flu


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5646a3.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5646.pdf

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5 Adult Immunization Schedule available in several more formats

The CDC website recently posted the Adult Immunization Schedule for October 2007-September 2008 in four additional formats: black and white brochure size (11" x 17"), color brochure size (11" x 17"), color regular size (8/5" x 11"), and color pocket size (6" x 4.5").

To access, the Adult Immunization Schedule in all available CDC versions, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/schedules/adult-schedule.htm

In addition, laminated copies of the Adult Immunization Schedule are available for sale on the IAC website.

To access the laminated version of the Adult Immunization Schedule, go to: http://www.immunize.org/shop/schedule_adult.asp

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6 Check your email: Wednesday's IAC Express Extra Edition will keep you up to date on activities and resources for National Immunization Vaccination Week

On November 28, IAC will send IAC Express subscribers an Extra Edition full of information and resources related to National Influenza Vaccination Week. Please look for it and share it with your colleagues who are not IAC Express subscribers. (And encourage them to become subscribers by going to http://www.immunize.org/subscribe)

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7 Important: Be sure to administer influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season--from fall 2007 through spring 2008

Influenza vaccination should continue from now into the early months of 2008. Visit the following websites often to find the information you need to keep vaccinating. Both are continually updated with the latest resources.

The National Influenza Vaccine Summit website at http://www.preventinfluenza.org

CDC's Seasonal Flu web section at http://www.cdc.gov/flu

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8 VIS for nasal-spray influenza vaccine now available in Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Tagalog, and Vietnamese

The current version (dated 10/4/07) of the VIS for live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV; nasal spray) is now available on the IAC website in Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Tagalog, and Vietnamese. IAC gratefully acknowledges the California Department of Health Services for the translations.

To obtain a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the VIS for LAIV vaccine in Arabic, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/abLAIV06.pdf

To obtain the VIS for LAIV vaccine in Chinese, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/chLAIV06.pdf

To obtain the VIS for LAIV vaccine in Korean, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/koLAIV06.pdf

To obtain the VIS for LAIV vaccine in Tagalog, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/taLAIV06.pdf

To obtain the VIS for LAIV vaccine in Vietnamese, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/vnLAIV06.pdf

To obtain the VIS for LAIV vaccine in English, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/liveflu.pdf

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 30 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis

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9 November issue of CDC's Immunization Works e-newsletter covers seasonal influenza and several other topics

The November issue of Immunization Works, a monthly email newsletter published by CDC, is available on the website of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD). The newsletter offers members of the immunization community non-proprietary information about current topics. CDC encourages its wide dissemination.

To mark the start of National Influenza Vaccination Week, the November issue contains a special section focused on seasonal influenza. Some of the information in the November issue has already appeared in previous issues of IAC Express. Following is the text of four articles we have not covered.


INFLUENZA UPDATE

NIVW STARTS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 26: To help raise awareness regarding the importance of obtaining influenza vaccination throughout the entire influenza season, HHS, the National Influenza Vaccine Summit, CDC, and other partners are conducting activities during the second annual National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW), November 26-December 2.

Influenza vaccination coverage in all groups recommended for vaccination remains suboptimal. Despite the timing of the peak of influenza disease, administration of vaccine decreases substantially after November. According to results from the National Health Interview Survey regarding the two most recent influenza seasons, approximately 84% of all influenza vaccinations were administered during September-November. Among persons 65 years or older, the percentage of September-November vaccinations was even higher, at 92%. Because many persons recommended for vaccination remain unvaccinated at the end of November, CDC is encouraging public-health partners and healthcare providers to conduct vaccination clinics and other activities that promote influenza vaccination during NIVW and throughout the remainder of the influenza season.

Each year, on average, approximately 15-60 million persons in the United States are infected with influenza virus; an estimated 200,000 persons are hospitalized from influenza complications, and an estimated 36,000 persons die from those complications. Influenza vaccination is the best way to prevent influenza and potentially severe complications. CDC recommends that anyone who wants to reduce their risk for influenza infection should be vaccinated every influenza season. Annual vaccination is particularly important for persons at high risk for influenza-related complications and severe disease as well as their close contacts.

The time to receive influenza vaccination starts when vaccine becomes available in the local community, and continues into January or later, when the influenza season typically peaks. Throughout NIVW, CDC will be highlighting the importance of influenza vaccination for persons at high risk, their close contacts, and all those who want to be protected from influenza. CDC, Families Fighting Flu, and other partners also have designated Tuesday, November 27, as Children's Flu Vaccination Day to put a special focus on the importance of vaccinating children at high risk and their close contacts.

NIVW posters and other influenza educational materials are available to download for local printing and distribution at CDC's Flu Gallery [http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/flugallery]. Other influenza-related tools and information for healthcare professionals and patients are available at CDC's Influenza Website [http://www.cdc.gov/flu]. More information about NIVW can be found in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report Notice to Readers [http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5646a3.htm]

NATION'S INFLUENZA VACCINE SUPPLIES CONTINUE TO INCREASE: So far this season 108 million doses of influenza vaccine have been distributed by manufacturers and major distributors--more doses than had ever previously been distributed in the U.S. in a single season. CDC officials believe that most influenza vaccine providers currently have supplies sufficient for meeting demand. As many as 132 million total doses of vaccine could be produced by the end of the 2007-2008 flu season, according to manufacturers. This record amount would be about 12 million more doses than were produced during the 2006-2007 season. During the 2006-2007 season, manufacturers distributed 102.5 million doses to providers. CDC officials have worked closely with vaccine manufacturers, distributors and the Food and Drug Administration to ensure improved vaccine availability. Flu vaccine distribution typically continues through December and early January. For more information, see the CDC press release [http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/2007/r071109.htm]

BREAKING FROM YOUR COMFORT ZONE: Please mark your calendars for December 6, noon EST, when the National Influenza Vaccine Summit and CDC will co-host a conference call about late season influenza vaccination for healthcare providers and partner constituents. Entitled Breaking from your Comfort Zone--Extending the Influenza Vaccination Season, the call will explain why it is important to extend the influenza vaccination season through March. The call will also provide up-to-the minute information about influenza activity and the status of influenza vaccine supply. More details about the call will be posted soon on the CDC Vaccine Web Site and through other partner communication channels.

FLU ACTIVITY AND SURVEILLANCE: Please bookmark the CDC Flu Activity and Surveillance website [http://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/fluactivity.htm] for weekly reports with U.S. influenza surveillance data. This site will be kept updated throughout the influenza season. The influenza activity map has a new look that will allow a dynamic view of the season's progression of influenza activity and will facilitate making black and white photocopies.


FRONT PAGE NEWS

NEW ACIP RECOMMENDATIONS: On October 24-25, CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) met in Atlanta, GA. The ACIP meets three times annually and provides recommendations to the Director of the CDC and the Secretary of HHS concerning the prevention of vaccine-preventable diseases in the United States. Below are key votes from the meeting [Note: IAC Express has already covered two of the key votes; following is information on the remaining one]:

Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV):
ACIP clarified existing Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV) recommendations to emphasize its recommendation that for healthy 24-through-59 months-old children with an incomplete PCV schedule, providers should administer one dose of PCV. For incompletely vaccinated children 24 through 59 months with underlying medical conditions, providers should administer two doses of PCV (if they have previously received three doses they only need one dose). The ACIP also recommended Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine (MCV4) for high risk children from 2 through 10 years old.


OTHER NEWS & SUMMARIES

UPDATE--CDC'S GLOBAL IMMUNIZATION ACTIVITIES: CDC recently led a team to establish an all-vaccine preventable disease (VPD) integrated surveillance system in Costa Rica with subject matter experts in Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae type b, rotavirus, and influenza. An integrated surveillance system for VPDs will build upon existing VPD surveillance infrastructure, highlight synergies, and conserve public health resources. In other global immunization news, in October, CDC led an immunization course in Atlanta to prepare Chinese provincial and national health officials for the 2008 Olympics. The course focused both on strategies for achieving regional goals of Measles Elimination and Hepatitis B Control by 2012, and on immunization systems issues in anticipation of the expansion of China's routine vaccinations from 6 to 12 recommended antigens.


MEETINGS, CONFERENCES & RESOURCES

END OF AN ERA: The satellite broadcast series Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases has been presented at least once a year since 1995. Because of escalating costs and limited availability of the CDC broadcast facility the series will no longer be presented as a live broadcast. Beginning in 2008 this training program will be available only on DVD and by Internet. The 2008 series is expected to be available in late spring. Additional details will be forthcoming in future editions of this publication.

Issues of Immunization Works are posted on CDC's Vaccines & Immunizations website a few days after publication. Once the November issue is posted, you can access it by going to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/news/newsltrs/imwrks Click on the link titled "Nov" under the banner titled "2007 Newsletters Available Online."

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10.  CDC updates "Vaccine Management," an essential document on vaccine storage and handling

Newly updated, "Vaccine Management," CDC's comprehensive and authoritative document on vaccine storage and handling, is now available for downloading. The document covers an array of vaccines (including combination vaccines) and succinctly presents the following information on each:

  • Shipping requirements
  • Condition on arrival
  • Storage requirements
  • Shelf life
  • Instructions for use
  • Shelf life after opening
  • Special instructions

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of "Vaccine Management," go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/downloads/bk-vac-mgt.pdf

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11.  NFID's S.T.O.P. Meningitis toolkit offers resources for immunizing adolescents and young adults

The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases' (NFID's) S.T.O.P. Meningitis Toolkit offers healthcare professionals and patients information on meningitis disease and vaccine.

To access the toolkit, go to: http://66.11.193.178/main.html

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12.  CDC's plans December 13 satellite broadcast and webcast on VPD surveillance

CDC published "Notice to Readers: Satellite Broadcast: Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases 2007" in the November 23 issue of MMWR. The article is reprinted below in its entirety, excluding references.


On December 13, 2007, CDC and the Public Health Training Network will present the satellite broadcast and webcast, Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases 2007. The 3.5-hour broadcast will occur live from 9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. EST. This program is designed to provide information on case investigation, outbreak control, and disease reporting for vaccine-preventable diseases, and will discuss methods of enhancing surveillance and completing case investigations. The program is specifically targeted to persons with surveillance responsibilities (e.g., those in state health departments). The broadcast will feature a live question-and-answer session in which participants nationwide can interact with course instructors via toll-free telephone lines. Continuing education credits will be provided. Additional information about the program is available at http://www2a.cdc.gov/phtn/vpd-07

Information for site administrators about establishing and registering a viewing location is available at http://www.cdc.gov/tceonline No registration is necessary to access the webcasts via an Internet connection. The link to the live webcast is available at http://www2a.cdc.gov/phtn/webcast/vpd-07 The webcast will be accessible through an Internet connection until January 14, 2008. The program will become available as a self-study DVD and Internet-based program in January 2008.


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5646a6.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5646.pdf

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Immunization Action Coalition  •  Saint Paul, MN
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.