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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2007
Issue number 694: November 19, 2007
 
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. CDC article shows U.S. mortality from vaccine-preventable diseases is at an all-time low
  2. IAC updates its online Ask the Experts information on influenza
  3. New: IAC website posts three of its patient-education materials, all newly translated into Spanish
  4. NIVS's "Influenza Activity Spotlight" offers healthcare professionals lots of resources and information
  5. Important: Be sure to administer influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season--from fall 2007 through spring 2008
  6. Health organizations urged to post CDC's influenza vaccination graphic on their websites
  7. Actress Jennifer Garner kicks off ALA's "Faces of Influenza" vaccination campaign
  8. CDC website posts presentation slides from the October ACIP meeting
  9. Website of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine now offers clinical scenarios on immunization
  10. NIAID awards contracts to strengthen and expand Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units (VTEUs)
  11. CDC reports on India's progress toward polio eradication from January 2006 to September 2007
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 694: November 19, 2007
1.  CDC article shows U.S. mortality from vaccine-preventable diseases is at an all-time low

On November 14, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) published "Historical Comparisons of Morbidity and Mortality for Vaccine-Preventable Disease in the United States," which was written by NCIRD staff. The abstract is reprinted below.


Context: National vaccine recommendations in the United States target an increasing number of vaccine-preventable diseases for reduction, elimination, or eradication.

Objective: To compare morbidity and mortality before and after widespread implementation of national vaccine recommendations for 13 vaccine-preventable diseases for which recommendations were in place prior to 2005.

Design, Setting, and Participants: For the United States, pre-vaccine baselines were assessed based on representative historical data from primary sources and were compared [with] the most recent morbidity (2006) and mortality (2004) data for diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, poliomyelitis, measles, mumps, rubella (including congenital rubella syndrome), invasive Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), acute hepatitis B, hepatitis A, varicella, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and smallpox.

Main Outcome Measures: Number of cases, deaths, and hospitalizations for 13 vaccine-preventable diseases. Estimates of the percent reductions from baseline to recent were made without adjustment for factors that could affect vaccine-preventable disease morbidity, mortality, or reporting.

Results: A greater than 92% decline in cases and a 99% or greater decline in deaths due to diseases prevented by vaccines recommended before 1980 were shown for diphtheria, mumps, pertussis, and tetanus. Endemic transmission of poliovirus and measles and rubella viruses has been eliminated in the United States; smallpox has been eradicated worldwide. Declines were 80% or greater for cases and deaths of most vaccine-preventable diseases targeted since 1980 including hepatitis A, acute hepatitis B, Hib, and varicella. Declines in cases and deaths of invasive S pneumoniae were 34% and 25%, respectively.

Conclusions: The number of cases of most vaccine-preventable diseases is at an all-time low; hospitalizations and deaths have also shown striking decreases.


To access the abstract, go to:
http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/298/18/2155

The article's full text is available to JAMA subscribers at
http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/298/18/2155

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2 IAC updates its online Ask the Experts information on influenza

IAC and CDC experts recently updated IAC's online Ask the Experts section on influenza to reflect ACIP's vote to recommend the use of FluMist, the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV; nasal-spray formulation), to include children age 2-5 years. Other updates were also made.

To access the influenza section of Ask the Experts, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/askexperts/experts_inf.asp

To access IAC's complete index of Ask the Experts information, go to http://www.immunize.org/askexperts

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3 New: IAC website posts three of its patient-education materials, all newly translated into Spanish

IAC recently posted Spanish-language versions of three of its patient-education materials: (1) "Vaccinations for Adults: You're never too old to get immunized!" (2) "If You Have HIV, Which Vaccinations Do You Need?" and (3) "If You Have Hepatitis C, Which Vaccinations Do You Need?"

(1) To access "Vacunas para adultos: Nunca se es muy viejo para vacunarse!" ("Vaccinations for Adults: You're never too old to get immunized!") in ready-to-print (PDF) format, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4030-01.pdf

To access "Vaccinations for Adults: You're never too old to get immunized!" in English, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4030.pdf

(2) To access "Que vacunas necesita si esta infectado con el VIH?" ("If You Have HIV, Which Vaccinations Do You Need?") in ready-to-print (PDF) format, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4041-01.pdf

To access "If You Have HIV, Which Vaccinations Do You Need?" in English, go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4041.pdf

(3) To access "Que vacunas necesita si tiene hepatitis C?" ("If You Have Hepatitis C, Which Vaccinations Do You Need?") in ready-to-print (PDF) format, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4042-01.pdf

To access "If You Have Hepatitis C, Which Vaccinations Do You Need?" in English, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4042.pdf

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4 NIVS's "Influenza Activity Spotlight" offers healthcare professionals lots of resources and information

"Influenza Activity Spotlight," the newsletter of the National Influenza Vaccine Summit (NIVS), is now available online. Seven issues have been published so far for the 2007-08 influenza season. They cover information and events related to influenza immunization, particularly those regarding National Influenza Vaccination Week, which is scheduled for November 26-December 2.

To access current and previous issues, go to: http://www.preventinfluenza.org/nivs.asp Scroll down to the heading "Newsletters Issued by the Summit," and click on the pertinent link.

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5 Important: Be sure to administer influenza vaccine throughout the influenza season--from fall 2007 through spring 2008

Influenza vaccination should continue from now into the early months of 2008. Visit the following websites often to find the information you need to keep vaccinating. Both are continually updated with the latest resources.

The National Influenza Vaccine Summit website at http://www.preventinfluenza.org

CDC's Seasonal Flu web section at http://www.cdc.gov/flu

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6 Health organizations urged to post CDC's influenza vaccination graphic on their websites

CDC is encouraging its partner health organizations to promote influenza vaccination by posting CDC's influenza graphic element on their websites. The text of the graphic reads: "Don't get flu. Don't spread flu. Get vaccinated." The message is available in English and Spanish.

For complete information about using the graphic, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/nivw/help.htm

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7 Actress Jennifer Garner kicks off ALA's "Faces of Influenza" vaccination campaign

On November 12, the American Lung Association (ALA), along with CDC, held a press conference to emphasize the need for annual influenza immunization. Actress Jennifer Garner, mother of a young child, is the spokesperson for ALA's 2007-08 "Faces of Influenza" vaccination campaign. Portions of the press release are reprinted below.


Actress Jennifer Garner joined leading medical officials at a press conference today to kick off the American Lung Association's national Faces of Influenza public awareness campaign, urging Americans to get their annual influenza vaccination. The program is designed to help Americans put a "face" on this serious disease and recognize annual immunization as a safe and effective way to protect themselves and their families against influenza. . . .

The American Lung Association's Faces of Influenza campaign aims to reach the more than two out of every three Americans recommended for annual influenza immunization, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). On average, approximately 36,000 people die and about 226,000 are hospitalized due to influenza and its complications in the U.S. every year. Garner's involvement will especially help reach women who are often the healthcare decision-makers for their families. . . .

Visitors to the website, http://www.facesofinfluenza.org, can view the photographs and stories featured in the Faces of Influenza Portrait Gallery, and learn more about influenza and how to prevent the spread of this serious virus through vaccination. The site offers reporters, consumers, and healthcare providers various educational materials about influenza and the importance of immunization. . . .

The American Lung Association continues to offer its online Flu Clinic Locator as a public service. By typing in their 5-digit zip code, site visitors can receive a list of immunization clinics in their area. . . . The Flu Clinic Locator can be accessed via http://www.facesofinfluenza.org, http://www.flucliniclocator.org and http://www.lungusa.org


To access the complete press release, go to: http://www.lungusa.org/site/pp.asp?c=dvLUK9O0E&b=34841 and click on the pertinent title.

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8 CDC website posts presentation slides from the October ACIP meeting

The CDC website recently posted the PowerPoint slides presented at the October 24-25 ACIP meeting. Slides are available on the following topics:

  • Influenza vaccines
  • Pneumococcal vaccines (PCV7)
  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4)
  • Childhood and adolescent immunization schedule
  • Combination vaccines
  • Immunization of HIV-infected adults
  • Vaccine Supply
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines
  • Immunization safety
  • Rotavirus vaccines
  • Hepatitis B

To access the slides, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/acip/slides-oct07.htm

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9 Website of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine now offers clinical scenarios on immunization

The Immunization Education Group of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine recently completed a series of clinical scenarios on immunization. All are available as PDF files and PowerPoint presentations.

To access them, go to:
http://www.immunizationed.org/anypage.aspx?pagename=ClinicalScenarios

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10.  NIAID awards contracts to strengthen and expand Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units (VTEUs)

On November 6, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) issued a press release announcing that it has awarded contracts to U.S. institutions that conduct clinical trials of promising candidate vaccines. The contracts, totaling $23.7 million over seven years, were awarded to eight research institutions.

To access the press release, go to:
http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/nov2007/niaid-06.htm

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11.  CDC reports on India's progress toward polio eradication from January 2006 to September 2007

CDC published "Progress Toward Poliomyelitis Eradication--India, January 2006-September 2007" in the November 16 issue of MMWR. Portions of a press summary are reprinted below.


The strong progress towards elimination of type 1 poliovirus in western Uttar Pradesh is evidence that poliovirus transmission can be interrupted in India. . . .

From January 2006-September 2007, India experienced two outbreaks of poliomyelitis--type 1 poliovirus in 2006 and type 3 poliovirus in 2007. The outbreak in 2006 was rapidly controlled using targeted vaccination campaigns in the areas where the outbreak occurred, and a similar strategy is underway this year for the type 3 polio outbreak.

The government of India and partner organizations have implemented multiple strategic interventions to reach at-risk populations. Successful eradication of poliomyelitis in India will require continued efforts toward controlling the type 3 polio outbreak, rapidly reducing the ongoing transmission of type 1 poliovirus in the state of Bihar, sustaining the current progress in Uttar Pradesh, and maintaining high population immunity in the remainder of the country.


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5645a3.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5645.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.