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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2007
Issue number 687: October 8, 2007
 
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. New: Updated VIS reflects FDA approval for use of nasal-spray influenza vaccine in children age 2-5 years
  2. CDC highlights FDA-approved changes to administration and storage of LAIV vaccine
  3. IAC updates five of its print materials--including FDA-approved changes in administration of LAIV vaccine to children
  4. CDC and NNii websites post resources related to thimerosal research published in the September 27 NEJM
  5. New: Spanish-language version of the current recommended childhood and adolescent immunization schedule now online
  6. WHO publishes recommendation on composition of influenza virus vaccines for southern hemisphere for 2008
  7. October 4 issue of Hep Express electronic newsletter available online
  8. CDC website posts information on production delays for Vaqta
    pediatric and adult hepatitis A vaccine
  9. Reminder: Registration deadline for Current Issues in Immunization net conference on travel health is October 10
  10. Reminder: Clinical Vaccinology course set for November 9-11 in Bethesda, MD
  11. For coalitions: Abstracts for the National Conference on Immunization & Health Coalitions are due February 1, 2008
  12. CDC reports on progress in controlling measles in Nepal during 2000-06
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 687: October 8, 2007
1.  New: Updated VIS reflects FDA approval for use of nasal-spray influenza vaccine in children age 2-5 years

On October 4, CDC released an updated edition of the VIS for the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV; nasal-spray formulation). The updated VIS reflects the FDA-approved change in the age at which LAIV can be given to children. Previously, LAIV was approved for use in children age 5 years and older; it is now approved for use in children age 2 years and older.

To access the updated VIS from the CDC website, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/downloads/vis-flulive.pdf

To access it from the IAC website, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/liveflu.pdf

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 30 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis

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2 CDC highlights FDA-approved changes to administration and storage of LAIV vaccine

CDC recently brought the following information to the attention of IAC and other organizations:

In the September 28 MMWR update on influenza activity (titled "Update: Influenza Activity--United States and Worldwide, May 20-September 15, 2007), the editorial note mentioned FDA's recent approval of FluMist (live attenuated influenza vaccine [LAIV]; nasal spray formulation) for use in healthy children aged 2 to 4 years, as well as three other FDA-approved changes. We want to make sure you were aware of these other changes, which include the following:

  1. a reduction in the volume of vaccine used to 0.1 mL per nostril,
  2. a reduction in the minimum dose spacing to 4 weeks for children who require 2 doses (which makes the LAIV minimum interval now the same as the TIV (trivalent inactivated vaccine; injectable) minimum interval, and
  3. a change in the temperature requirements for shipping and storage of the vaccine (now 2-8 degrees C [35-46 degrees F])

The link to the MMWR influenza update is:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5638a4.htm

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3 IAC updates five of its print materials--including FDA-approved changes in administration of LAIV vaccine to children

IAC recently revised five of its print materials; two revisions reflect the FDA-approved change in the age at which the live inactivated influenza vaccine (LAIV; nasal-spray formulation) can be given to children. Previously, LAIV was approved for use in children age 5 years and older; it is now approved for use in children age 2 years and older. Information on the five revised print materials follows:

(1) "Summary of Recommendations for Childhood and Adolescent Immunization" (revised 10/07): The section on influenza vaccine was changed to indicate that LAIV vaccine may be given to healthy, non-pregnant persons age 2-49 years.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of it, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2010.pdf

(2) "Standing Orders for Administering Influenza Vaccines to Children & Adolescents" (revised 10/07): The section on vaccine administration now states that healthy children age 2 years and older without contraindications may be given LAIV.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of it, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3074a.pdf

(3) "It's Federal Law! You must give your patients current Vaccine Information Statements (VISs)" (revised 9/07): The table that lists the most current VIS dates was updated to show that 8/16/07 is the most current date for the VIS for meningococcal vaccine.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of it, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2027.pdf


(4) "If You Have HIV Infection, Which Vaccinations Do You Need?" (revised 10/07): Minor changes were made.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of it, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4041.pdf


(5) "Declination of Influenza Vaccination" (revised 9/07): Minor changes were made.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of it, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4068.pdf

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4 CDC and NNii websites post resources related to thimerosal research published in the September 27 NEJM

In its September 27 issue, the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) published a research article, "Early Thimerosal Exposure and Neuropsychological Outcomes at 7 to 10 Years," about thimerosal in childhood vaccines. In response, CDC and the National Network of Immunization Information (NNii) posted resources related to the article on their websites. Information about and links to the resources follow.

From CDC: CDC resources were compiled by the Office of the Chief Science Officer at CDC. The resources include a brief synopsis of the NEJM article, an explanation of terms used in the article, FAQs pertinent to the article information, and links to other electronic sources of information. To access these materials (posted 9/28/07), click here.

From NNii: On September 26, NNii issued a press release related to the NEJM article. To access it, click here.

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5 New: Spanish-language version of the current recommended childhood and adolescent immunization schedule now online

The 2007 Recommended Childhood, Adolescent, and Catch-up Immunization Schedule is now available in Spanish and can be printed from the CDC website. The schedule, which was released in English in January 2007, has been approved by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP).

To access the Spanish-language schedule, click here.

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6 WHO publishes recommendation on composition of influenza virus vaccines for southern hemisphere for 2008

The October 5 issue of the Weekly Epidemiological Record (WER; a periodical published by WHO) included an article titled "Recommended composition of influenza virus vaccines for use in the 2008 influenza season." The article includes the recommendation on the composition of the influenza virus vaccine for use in the southern hemisphere in winter 2008. Portions of the article are reprinted below.


This recommendation relates to the composition of vaccines for next winter in the southern hemisphere (May-October 2008). A recommendation will be made in February 2008 relating to vaccines for use during winter in the northern hemisphere (November 2008-April 2009). . . .

It is recommended that vaccines for use in the 2008 influenza season (southern hemisphere winter) contain the following:
  • An A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 (H1N1)-like virus
  • An A/Brisbane/10/2007 (H3N2)-like virus
  • A B/Florida/4/2006-like virus . . . .

To access the complete article, go to:
http://www.who.int/wer/2007/wer8240.pdf

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7 October 4 issue of Hep Express electronic newsletter available online

The October 4 issue of Hep Express, an electronic newsletter published by IAC, is now available online. It is intended for health professionals, program planners, and advocates involved in prevention, screening, and treatment of viral hepatitis.

IAC Express has already covered some of the information presented in the October 4 Hep Express; titles of articles we have not yet covered follow.

  • IAC updates prevention programs website
  • LOLA [Latino Organization for Liver Awareness] offering Spanish-language support groups
  • Global Hepatitis A Meeting planned for November 30-December 1 in Miami
  • SIGN [Safe Injection Global Network] meeting to take place October 23-25 in Geneva, Switzerland

To access the October 4 issue, go to:
http://www.hepprograms.org/hepexpress/issue62.asp

To sign up for a free subscription to Hep Express, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/subscribe

To access previous issues of Hep Express, go to:
http://www.hepprograms.org/hepexpress

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8 CDC website posts information on production delays for Vaqta pediatric and adult hepatitis A vaccine

On September 28, NCIRD updated its website with information about a current production delay for Vaqta hepatitis A vaccine; the delay applies to both the pediatric and adult formulations of Vaqta. The vaccine delay information is reprinted below in its entirety.


Merck & Co., Inc., are experiencing production delays for Pediatric and Adult hepatitis A vaccine (Pediatric & Adult VAQTA), resulting in backorders for these products. Merck has temporarily discontinued accepting orders for Pediatric VAQTA and Adult VAQTA in the vial formulation. Based on current information, it is estimated that VAQTA will be available in late first-quarter 2008, but actual timing will be confirmed when more is known. GSK [GlaxoSmithKline] production and supply of their Pediatric and Adult hepatitis A vaccine (Pediatric & Adult Havrix) and their Adult hepatitis A/hepatitis B combination vaccine (Twinrix) are currently in good supply to meet demand. GSK has initiated plans to increase production of Havrix and Twinrix, to help ensure uninterrupted supply for the U.S. market.

To access the information from the NCIRD website, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/shortages and scroll down the section titled Chart of Vaccines in Delay or Shortage.

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9 Reminder: Registration deadline for Current Issues in Immunization net conference on travel health is October 10

The theme of the next Current Issues in Immunization net conference is "travel health issues, including malaria." It is scheduled for October 11, noon to 1PM ET. The moderator is Andrew Kroger, MD, MPH; the speaker is Katherine Tan, MD, MPH.

Registration will close October 10 at midnight ET or when the course is full. To register, go to:
http://www2.cdc.gov/nip/isd/ciinc2

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10.  Reminder: Clinical Vaccinology course set for November 9-11 in Bethesda, MD

CDC published "Notice to Readers: Clinical Vaccinology CourseóNovember 9-11, 2007" in the September 28 issue of MMWR. The notice is reprinted below in its entirety.


CDC and four other national organizations are collaborating with the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID), Emory University School of Medicine, and the Emory Vaccine Center to sponsor a Clinical Vaccinology Course, November 9-11, 2007, at the Hyatt Regency Bethesda Hotel in Bethesda, Maryland. Through lectures and interactive presentations, the course will focus on new developments and concerns related to the use of vaccines in pediatric, adolescent, and adult populations. Leading infectious-disease experts, including pediatricians, internists, and family physicians will present information on newly available vaccines, vaccines under development, and older vaccines whose continued administration is essential to improving disease prevention.

This course is specifically designed for physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, vaccine-program administrators, and other healthcare professionals interested in the clinical aspects of vaccinology. The course also might be useful for healthcare professionals involved in prevention and control of infectious diseases, including federal, state, and local public health officials.

Continuing education credits will be offered. Information regarding the preliminary program, registration, and hotel accommodations is available at http://www.nfid.org/conferences/idcourse07 or by email (idcourse@nfid.org), fax [(301) 907-0878], telephone [(301) 656-0003, ext. 19], or mail (NFID, 4733 Bethesda Avenue, Suite 750, Bethesda, MD 20814-5228).


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the notice, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5638a6.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5638.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

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11.  For coalitions: Abstracts for the National Conference on Immunization & Health Coalitions are due February 1, 2008

The 2008 National Conference on Immunization and Health Coalitions is now accepting abstract submissions. The conference, which will be held in San Francisco on May 21-23, 2008, will provide training in creating, leading, and sustaining effective coalitions for all health-related issues. Abstract applications must be received electronically by February 1, 2008.

For information on submitting an abstract and for preliminary conference details, go to: http://www.sfimmunize.org/page3.html Scroll down and click on the pertinent links.

For additional information, email Andrew Resignato at andrew@sfimmunize.org

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12.  CDC reports on progress in controlling measles in Nepal during 2000-06

CDC published "Progress in Measles ControlóNepal, 2000-2006" in the October 5 issue of MMWR. An article synopsis made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.


In Nepal, the goal of the United Nations Special Assembly on Children to reduce measles-related mortality by half between 1999 and 2005 was achieved.

This report quantifies the achievements of measles control strategy in Nepal which aims to reduce mortality related to measles. We describe routine immunization activities in Nepal, the implementation of measles vaccination campaigns, and measles surveillance data for the period 2000Ė2006. The findings demonstrate a substantial decrease in reported measles incidence and provide [an] important example for other countries in the South East Asia Region.


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5639a4.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5639.pdf

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Immunization Action Coalition  •  1573 Selby Ave  •  St. Paul, MN 55104
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.