Home
|
About IAC
|
Contact
|
A-Z Index
|
Donate
|
Shop
|
SUBSCRIBE
Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2007
Issue number 664: May 21, 2007
 
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. Visit IAC's newly redesigned VIS web section
  2. New: Two standing orders protocols for administering HPV vaccine--one for children/teens, one for adults
  3. IAC updates its popular professional-education piece "Summary of Recommendations for Adult Immunization"
  4. IAC updates its online Ask the Experts information on hepatitis A and hepatitis B
  5. VIS update: CDC makes minor revisions to the VIS for DTaP vaccine
  6. May issue of CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter now available online
  7. For coalitions: June 12 is the date for IZTA's teleconference update on the Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program
  8. CDC reports on recent U.S. vaccinia virus transmission in the household of a military smallpox vaccinee
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 664: May 21, 2007
1.  Visit IAC's newly redesigned VIS web section

Looking for up-to-date Vaccine Information Statements (VIS) in English and more than 30 languages for your patients? Navigate to IAC's newly redesigned VIS web section.

IAC's most frequently visited web section is the VIS web section, which gets thousands of visitors each day. All VISs on IAC's site are in ready-to-print (PDF) format. You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to view them.

From the VIS index page, you can choose to search for VISs sorted in an alphabetical listing, as well as by vaccine name and language. To view the VIS web section, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis

To view the "VISs Alphabetical" web page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/?f=7

To view the "VISs by Vaccine" index page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/?f=8

To view the "VISs by Language" index page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/?f=9

Look for the new navigation column on the left-hand side of the VIS index page. It provides quick links to more VIS web subsections, such as "How to Use VISs," "Other VIS Sources," "VISs in Alternative Formats," and "Michigan Versions of VISs."

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 30 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis

Receive updates about new postings to the VIS web section by subscribing to IAC Express at http://www.immunize.org/subscribe You will receive FREE periodic email messages about new and important immunization and hepatitis B information.

Back to top
   
2 New: Two standing orders protocols for administering HPV vaccine--one for children/teens, one for adults

IAC's new professional-education pieces "Standing Orders for Administering Human Papillomavirus Vaccine to Children and Teens" and "Standing Orders for Administering Human Papillomavirus Vaccine to Adults" are now available on IAC's website.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the standing orders for administering HPV vaccine to children and teens, go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3090.pdf

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the standing orders for administering HPV vaccine to adults, go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3091.pdf

To access a table with links to all IAC's standing orders protocols for vaccine administration and medical management of vaccine reactions, as well as standing orders for newborn-nursery hepatitis B vaccination, go to: http://www.immunize.org/standingorders

Back to top
   
3 IAC updates its popular professional-education piece "Summary of Recommendations for Adult Immunization"

IAC's professional-education piece "Summary of Recommendations for Adult Immunization" condenses hundreds of pages of recommendations into a handy three-page chart. The hepatitis A and hepatitis B information on the chart was revised in May to reflect recent changes in CDC's recommendations for immunizing adults against these two diseases. The following sections were also revised: influenza, Tdap, shingles, varicella, and others.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2011b.pdf

Back to top
   
4 IAC updates its online Ask the Experts information on hepatitis A and hepatitis B

IAC and CDC experts recently updated the online Ask the Experts sections on hepatitis A and hepatitis B to reflect the most current information and recommendations.

To access the hepatitis A section of Ask the Experts, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2021a.htm

To access the hepatitis B section of Ask the Experts, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2021b.htm

To access IAC's complete index of Ask the Experts information, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/askexperts

Back to top
   
5 VIS update: CDC makes minor revisions to the VIS for DTaP vaccine

On May 17, CDC released a revised edition of the VIS for the diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTaP) vaccine, which is recommended for children age 6 years and younger. Minor updates were made: Section 4 ("Older children and adults") now contains a reference to Tdap vaccine. In Sections 6 and 7, the web addresses for VAERS and the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program have been updated, and in Section 1 the case-fatality rate for tetanus was changed from 1/10 to 2/10 to reflect current data. Existing stocks of the previous (7/30/01) edition of the VIS may still be used.

To access the VIS for DTaP vaccine from the NIP website, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/VIS/default.htm#dtap

To access it from the IAC website, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/dtap01.pdf

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 30 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis

Back to top
   
6 May issue of CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter now available online

The May issue of Immunization Works, a monthly email newsletter published by CDC, is available on NIP's website. The newsletter offers members of the immunization community non-proprietary information about current topics. CDC encourages its wide dissemination.

Some of the information in the May issue has already appeared in previous issues of IAC Express. Following is the text of three articles we have not covered.


OTHER NEWS & SUMMARIES

PARTNERS CONVENE FOR NATIONAL INFLUENZA VACCINE SUMMIT: On April 19 and 20, more than 190 representatives from 83 different public and private organizations convened in Atlanta, GA, for the 2007 National Influenza Vaccine Summit, co-hosted by the American Medical Association (AMA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The objectives of the meeting were to address the challenges of the recent 2006-2007 influenza season, plan for the 2007-2008 season, learn about initiatives and success stories for increasing demand for vaccine, and develop innovative ideas for addressing issues identified during the Summit. Keynote speeches were given by Dr. Ronald M. Davis, president-elect of the AMA, and Dr. Anne Schuchat, director, CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD). Four licensed influenza vaccine manufacturers provided estimates for production for influenza vaccine for the 2007-2008 season. According to their estimates, production may be as high as 132 million doses. Based on the topics presented and discussed, the Summit Executive Committee will consider the development of several action teams. PowerPoint slide presentations for each presenter are available on the Summit's website at http://preventinfluenza.org under "What's New."


WALTER ORENSTEIN RECEIVES MERIEUX AWARD: The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) has presented the 2007 Dr. Charles Merieux Award for Achievement in Vaccinology and Immunology to Walter A. Orenstein, MD, associate director of the Emory Vaccine Center. The award was given at the NFID's Tenth Annual Conference on Vaccine Research in Baltimore on April 30. Dr. Orenstein also delivered a lecture on the state of immunization. The Merieux Award honors those whose outstanding lifetime contributions to the fight against vaccine-preventable diseases have led to significant improvement in public health.

Dr. Orenstein culminated a 26-year career at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as Director of CDC's National Immunization Program (NIP). At NIP, Dr. Orenstein led the U.S. effort to eliminate many of the most common vaccine-preventable diseases in this country. He served as an assistant surgeon general of the U. S. Public Health Service, as chairman of the World Health Organization's Technical Consultative Group on the Global Eradication of Poliomyelitis, as a member and rapporteur of the Pan American Health Organization's Technical Advisory Group on Vaccines and Immunization, as a member of the National Vaccine Advisory Committee, and as a member of the International Editorial Board for the journal Vaccine. Dr. Orenstein is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. His many honors include the receipt of the CDC's Charles C. Shepard Lifetime Scientific Achievement Award in 2004.


MEETINGS, CONFERENCES & RESOURCES

UPCOMING SATELLITE BROADCASTS: Please mark your calendars for several upcoming satellite broadcasts from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD). These include Immunization Update 2007 (August 9, 2007) and Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases (December 13, 2007). Also, the annual four-part series broadcast, Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases, will occur on January 31, February 7, February 14, and February 21, 2008. As more information becomes available, it will be posted at http://www2.cdc.gov/phtn

To access the complete May issue from the NIP website, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/news/newsltrs/imwrks/2007/200705.htm

Back to top
   
7 For coalitions: June 12 is the date for IZTA's teleconference update on the Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program

The Immunization Coalitions Technical Assistance Network (IZTA) conference call on June 12 will provide an overview of the Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program, a discussion of recent program changes, and information about coverage of new adolescent vaccines. IZTA is a program of the Center for Health Communication, Academy for Educational Development.

The presenter is Nancy Fenlon, public health advisor, Program Operations Branch, Immunization Services Division, CDC/NCIRD.

The June 12 call will be held at 3PM, ET. To register, send an email to izta@aed.org Include this message: "Sign me up for the VFC call."

For additional information, or to access earlier programs, go to:
http://www.izta.org/confcall.cfm

Back to top
   
8 CDC reports on recent U.S. vaccinia virus transmission in the household of a military smallpox vaccinee

CDC published "Household Transmission of Vaccinia Virus from Contact with a Military Smallpox Vaccinee--Illinois and Indiana, 2007" in the May 18 issue of MMWR. The report presents information about the son and wife of a military smallpox vaccinee, both of whom contracted vaccinia virus infection from the vaccinee. The son's chest and abdomen, covered with a rash of umbilicated lesions caused by eczema vaccinatum, is pictured in the article.

A summary of the MMWR article made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.


Healthcare providers and public health professionals should ask about any contact with recent smallpox vaccinees when evaluating patients with vesicular lesions compatible with vaccinia. Early identification of such an exposure allows for rapid and appropriate diagnostic testing, timely contact tracing, and clinical intervention, as needed. In addition, correct, early diagnosis facilitates prompt patient counseling to prevent further transmission of the virus.

Since February 2007, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Department of Defense have received five reports of vaccinia infection associated with military service members who had been recently vaccinated for smallpox, including two cases from Indiana and one case each from Alabama, Alaska, and New Mexico. This report describes the two cases from Indiana. The first, which occurred in a 28-month-old child, involved a life-threatening complication of vaccinia virus infection, eczema vaccinatum (EV). The child initially became ill after coming into contact with his father, an active duty serviceman who had recently received a smallpox vaccination. After the child's illness began, his mother also became ill, presumably having contracted vaccinia virus infection while caring for the child. The smallpox vaccine contains live vaccinia virus, which confers protection against infection from variola virus, the cause of smallpox. Vaccinia virus can be transmitted from the unhealed vaccination site of a vaccine recipient to other persons through direct (skin-to-skin) contact or through indirect contact by means of fomites (e.g., washcloths, towels).


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the MMWR article, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5619a4.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5619.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

Back to top
   
Immunization Action Coalition  •  2550 University Avenue West  •  Suite 415 North  •  Saint Paul, Minnesota  •  55114
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.