Home
|
About IAC
|
Contact
|
A-Z Index
|
Donate
|
Shop
|
SUBSCRIBE
Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2007
Issue number 656: April 9, 2007
 
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. CDC publishes recommendations for animal rabies prevention and control
  2. CDC updates its HPV brochure for clinicians and posts counseling messages on its HPV web section
  3. Updated: IAC revises its professional-education piece on vaccine contraindications and precautions in adults
  4. 150 immunization coalitions have posted information on IAC's izcoalitions.org website—is yours one of them?
  5. Immunization Coalitions Technical Assistance Network plans webcast for April 10 and conference call for April 24
  6. CDC reports on measles elimination in South Korea
  7. CDC adds novel influenza A virus infections to its National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System
  8. NIAID plans to expand its programs for influenza research and surveillance
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 656: April 9, 2007
1.  CDC publishes recommendations for animal rabies prevention and control

CDC published "Compendium of Animal Rabies Prevention and Control, 2007: National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians, Inc. (NASPHV)" in the April 6 issue of MMWR Recommendations and Reports. The introductory paragraphs are reprinted below.


Rabies is a fatal viral zoonosis and a serious public health problem. The disease is an acute progressive encephalitis caused by a lyssavirus. Multiple viral variants are maintained in wild mammal populations in the United States, but all mammals are believed to be susceptible to the disease. For purposes of this document, use of the term "animal" refers to mammals.

The recommendations in this compendium serve as a basis for animal rabies-prevention and -control programs throughout the United States and facilitate standardization of procedures among jurisdictions, thereby contributing to an effective national rabies-control program. This document is reviewed annually and revised as necessary. These recommendations do not supersede state and local laws or requirements. Principles of rabies prevention and control are detailed in Part I; recommendations for parenteral vaccination procedures are presented in Part II, and all animal rabies vaccines licensed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and marketed in the United States are listed in Part III.


To obtain a web-text (HTML) version of the recommendations online, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5603a1.htm

To obtain a ready-to-copy (PDF) version, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/rr/rr5603.pdf

Back to top
   
2 CDC updates its HPV brochure for clinicians and posts counseling messages on its HPV web section

CDC recently announced that it has updated the brochure "Human Papillomavirus: HPV information for clinicians" and posted four sets of counseling messages to assist providers in their HPV-related discussions with patients. The counseling messages address (1) information for parents about the HPV vaccine, (2) information for women about the Pap and HPV tests, (3) information for women who receive a positive HPV test result, and (4) information for patients receiving a genital warts diagnosis.

To access the brochure and the four counseling messages, go to:  http://www.cdc.gov/std/hpv/hpv-clinicians-brochure.htm and click on the appropriate link.

In the future, CDC will print the brochure with counseling insert cards and make it available for free online ordering. IAC Express will tell readers when the print version is available.

Back to top
   
3 Updated: IAC revises its professional-education piece on vaccine contraindications and precautions in adults

IAC recently updated its one-page professional-education piece "Guide to Contraindications and Precautions to Commonly Used Vaccines in Adults." It now has information on the following vaccines: Tdap, MMR, HPV, and zoster.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the revised piece, go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3072.pdf

Back to top
   
4 150 immunization coalitions have posted information on IAC's izcoalitions.org website—is yours one of them?

Since launching its izcoalitions.org website (http://www.izcoalitions.org) in 2002, IAC has posted information from 150 immunization coalitions. The site includes data from coalitions at all levels (local, state, regional, and national) and of all types, vaccine-specific as well as age-specific (childhood, adult, senior).

This online database allows health professionals, immunization advocates, parents, and others to contact specific coalitions to find resources, share ideas, and form strategic partnerships. Searches can be done by coalition name or geographic area.

Be sure your coalition is part of this powerful web-based networking tool by logging on and checking for your coalition's listing. If your coalition is not listed, sign up today. If you're already signed up, and information about your coalition has changed, be sure to update your listing to help us keep izcoalitions.org current and accurate.

To search the izcoalitions.org website, go to:
http://www.izcoalitions.org

If you have questions or difficulties using the website, send an email to Janelle at janelle@immunize.org or call her at (651) 647-9009.

Back to top
   
5 Immunization Coalitions Technical Assistance Network plans webcast for April 10 and conference call for April 24

The Immunization Coalitions Technical Assistance Network (IZTA) has scheduled a webcast on evaluating coalitions for April 10 and a conference call on working with the faith-based community on April 24. The network is a program of the Center for Health Communication, Academy for Educational Development. Information on each April program follows.

April 10. A webcast titled "Coalition Evaluation Made Easy" will be held at 1:00PM, ET, April 10. The presenters are Fran Butterfoss, PhD, professor and director, Division of Behavioral Research and Community Health, Department of Pediatrics, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA; and Amy Paulson, director, Consortium for Infant and Child Health, Center for Pediatric Research, Norfolk, VA.

To register, send an email to izta@aed.org Include this message: "Sign me up for the coalition evaluation webcast."

April 24. A conference call titled "Extending a C.U.R.E. for Reaching the Faith-Based Community to Build Immunization Awareness" will be held at 2:00PM ET, April 24. The presenter is Hilda R. Carroll-Davis, PhD, MTS, director of faith initiatives, Commissioner's Office, Tennessee Department of Health.

To register, send an email to izta@aed.org Include this message: "Sign me up for the faith communities call."

For additional information, or to access earlier programs, go to:
http://www.izta.org/confcall.cfm

Back to top
   
6 CDC reports on measles elimination in South Korea

CDC published "Elimination of Measles—South Korea, 2001-2006" in the April 6 issue of MMWR. A portion of a summary made available to the press is reprinted below.


In late 2006, South Korea became the first country in the WHO Western Pacific Region to declare measles elimination. As recently as 2000-2001, a large measles epidemic in the country resulted in 55,000 reported cases and 7 deaths. Several strategies led to the successful elimination of measles from the country: (1) A primary school entry requirement for documentation of a second dose of measles vaccine was implemented in 2001, resulting in up to 99 percent coverage among 7-year-olds. (2) Implementation of a nationwide measles vaccination campaign among children aged 8-16 in 2001, which achieved high coverage (97 percent of the target population). (3) Implementation of case-based measles surveillance and collection of clinical specimens.


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5613a3.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5613.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP recommendations), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

Back to top
   
7 CDC adds novel influenza A virus infections to its National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

CDC published "Notice to Readers: Addition of Novel Influenza A Virus Infections to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System, 2007" in the April 6 issue of MMWR. The notice is reprinted below in its entirety, excluding references.


On January 9, 2007, the Executive Committee of the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) approved an interim position statement, adding novel influenza A virus infections to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS). This issue of MMWR adds novel influenza A virus infection to Table I (Provisional cases of infrequently reported notifiable diseases, United States). The addition of this infection to NNDSS is expected to facilitate the following: (1) timely identification and confirmation of cases, (2) timely reporting of cases to CDC, and (3) early initiation of appropriate health responses to human infections with novel influenza A viruses that might have pandemic potential.

These infections must be reported immediately to the World Health Organization under the revised International Health Regulations (IHR) approved by the World Health Assembly on May 23, 2005. The revised regulations will take effect in the United States on June 15, 2007. CDC is collaborating with partners to develop plans to implement the revised IHR by that date.


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5613a4.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5613.pdf

Back to top
   
8 NIAID plans to expand its programs for influenza research and surveillance

On April 2, the National Institutes of Health announced that the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) plans to expand its capability for influenza research and surveillance. The announcement's opening paragraph is reprinted below.


The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), today announced it is awarding $23 million per year for seven years to establish six Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance. Collectively, the centers will expand NIAID's influenza surveillance program internationally and in the United States, and will bolster influenza research in key areas, including understanding how the virus causes disease and how the human immune system responds to infection with the virus. The goal of the newly created centers is to provide the federal government with important information to inform public health strategies for controlling and lessening the impact of seasonal influenza as well as an influenza pandemic.

To access the complete announcement, go to:
http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/apr2007/niaid-02.htm

Back to top
   
Immunization Action Coalition  •  1573 Selby Ave  •  St. Paul, MN 55104
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.