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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2007
Issue number 646: February 19, 2007
 
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. FDA issues Public Health Notification on information on RotaTeq and intussusception
  2. National Influenza Vaccine Summit announces recipients of the 2007 Immunization Excellence Awards
  3. Reminder: Be sure to continue administering influenza vaccine during the early months of 2007
  4. Infectious Diseases in Children publishes two-part report on the challenges of vaccination reimbursement
  5. IAC's hepatitis website celebrates its six-year anniversary
  6. February 14 issue of IAC's Hep Express electronic newsletter available online
  7. CDC outlines differences in HPV vaccination recommendations issued by ACIP and the American Cancer Society
  8. February issue of CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter available online
  9. CDC reports on U.S. influenza activity from October 2, 2006, to February 3, 2007
  10. CDC's Influenza web section updates five resources on seasonal influenza
  11. National Viral Hepatitis Training Center announces 2007 training dates
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 646: February 19, 2007
1.  FDA issues Public Health Notification on information on RotaTeq and intussusception

On February 13, FDA issued an FDA Public Health Notification titled "Information on RotaTeq and Intussusception." It discussed 28 post-marketing reports of intussusception following administration of RotaTeq, a live, oral, pentavalent rotavirus vaccine manufactured by Merck and Co., Inc.

On February 14, CDC released additional information on its website on this topic. The CDC information includes Key Facts and a Q&A about RotaTeq and intussusception. CDC has not changed its vaccination policy and continues to support the ACIP recommendation for routine immunization of all U.S. infants with three doses of RotaTeq vaccine at ages 2, 4, and 6 months.

WHO also released a statement on the topic, as did the PATH Rotavirus Vaccine Program.

The CDC information is printed below in its entirety. A link to the FDA's notification and to the WHO and PATH statements are included at the end of this IAC Express article.


The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has notified health care providers and consumers about reports of intussusception following administration of Rotavirus, Live, Oral, Pentavalent vaccine (trade name RotaTeq), manufactured by Merck and Co., Inc (http://www.fda.gov/cber/safety/phnrota021307.htm) FDA has issued this notification to encourage the reporting of any additional cases of intussusception that may have occurred or will occur in the future after administration of RotaTeq. The number of intussusception cases reported to date after RotaTeq administration does not exceed the number we would expect to occur without vaccination. Although the data we have received so far suggests that RotaTeq does not cause intussusception, it is possible that because of incomplete reporting of cases to VAERS [Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System] and other factors, some increased risk of intussusception associated with RotaTeq vaccination could yet be found. Thus, CDC and FDA are continuing to carefully monitor reports of possible adverse effects of the vaccine.

KEY FACTS
  • We are not surprised by the number of reported intussusception cases following RotaTeq vaccination.
     
  • Intussusception, a form of bowel obstruction, occurs spontaneously in the absence of vaccination. There are a number of intussusception cases that occur every year in children in the age group recommended for RotaTeq (6-32 weeks of age) and are not related to the vaccine.
     
  • The number of intussusception cases reported to date after RotaTeq administration is consistent with the number of cases we expected to see based on background rates in unvaccinated children.
     
  • These cases were detected through routine monitoring of a new vaccine using the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). This routine monitoring is done to ensure the safety of all vaccines. We are closely monitoring VAERS reports for this vaccine as we would with any newly licensed vaccine. However, we are aware of past issues with rotavirus vaccine and intussusception and, therefore, we will continue to closely watch for cases of intussusception following rotavirus vaccination.
     
  • This notice does not mean there is a problem with the RotaTeq vaccine. CDC is not changing its policy at this time. CDC continues to support the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices' (ACIP) recommendation for routine immunization of all U.S. infants with three doses of RotaTeq administered orally at ages 2, 4, and 6 months. (http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/acip-list.htm)
     
  • This report will be discussed at the February 21-22 ACIP meeting.
     
  • CDC and FDA encourage all healthcare providers and other individuals to report any cases of intussusception or other severe adverse events to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. For a copy of the vaccine reporting form, call (800) 822-7967 or report online to http://www.vaers.hhs.gov

QUESTIONS ABOUT ROTATEQ & INTUSSUSCEPTION

* What is rotavirus?
Rotavirus is a virus that causes severe diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and dehydration (gastroenteritis) in infants and young children. It is the leading cause of gastroenteritis in infants and children worldwide.

Each year in the United States, rotavirus is responsible for more than 400,000 doctor visits; more than 200,000 emergency room visits; 55,000 to 70,000 hospitalizations; and between 20 and 60 deaths. In developing countries, rotavirus is a major cause of childhood deaths, estimated to cause more than half a million deaths each year in children less than 5 years of age.

* What is RotaTeq vaccine?
RotaTeq vaccine is the only vaccine approved in the United States for prevention of rotavirus disease. Licensed in 2006, RotaTeq is the best way to protect your child against rotavirus disease. Studies indicate that RotaTeq will prevent about 74 percent of all rotavirus cases and about 98 percent of the most severe cases, including 96 percent of cases requiring hospitalization.

* Is this the same vaccine for rotavirus that was taken off the market because of problems?
No, this is not the same vaccine. In 1999, RotaShield, a different rotavirus vaccine, was withdrawn from the market after it was found to be associated with a type of bowel obstruction called intussusception.

* What is intussusception?
Intussusception is a serious, life-threatening condition that occurs when the intestine or bowel becomes blocked. One portion of the intestine telescopes into a nearby portion, causing the obstruction. This leads to inflammation, swelling, and eventually decreased blood flow. With prompt detection and treatment, almost all patients fully recover. Although persons of any age can get intussusception, it is most common among infants in the first year of life. Each year, approximately 1,400 U.S. infants less than 12 months of age are hospitalized for intussusception. These cases occurred every year before use of any rotavirus vaccines in the United States.

* Has the association between the new RotaTeq vaccine and intussusception been studied in clinical trials?
Yes. The risk of intussusception for RotaTeq was evaluated prior to licensure in a large clinical study involving more than 70,000 children. In that study, there was no association found between RotaTeq and intussusception. Now that the vaccine is being broadly administered, CDC and FDA continue to monitor RotaTeq for problems in those who receive the vaccine.

* How are CDC and FDA monitoring RotaTeq's safety?
Following licensure and general use of RotaTeq and other vaccines in the United States, safety is closely monitored by the FDA and CDC through the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). These agencies monitor and evaluate all reports of intussusception and other side effects reported to VAERS.

In addition, CDC is conducting a large study to rapidly detect any association between RotaTeq and intussusception, as well as other potential adverse events through its Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD). The VSD evaluates vaccine safety in approximately 90,000 infants born each year. Merck and Co., the vaccine's manufacturer, will conduct a separate post-licensure study of approximately 44,000 children.

* Are all adverse events reported to VAERS caused by vaccines?
No. It is important to know that many adverse events reported to VAERS may not be caused by vaccines. Reports to VAERS may be submitted by anyone, including healthcare providers, patients, and family members. Because of this, VAERS is subject to several limitations including inaccurate reporting and incomplete information.

VAERS receives reports of many events that occur after immunization. Some of these events may occur coincidentally following vaccination, while others may actually be caused by vaccination. The fact that an adverse event occurred following immunization is not conclusive evidence that the event was caused by a vaccine. Factors such as medical history and other medications taken near the time of the vaccination must be examined to determine if they could have caused the adverse event.

* Does the available data since RotaTeq has been on the market indicate that the vaccine is associated with intussusception?
No. Since its licensure on February 3, 2006, until January 31, 2007, CDC and FDA through VAERS have received 28 reports of intussusception 0-73 days following RotaTeq vaccination. Half of these cases—14—occurred within 21 days following vaccination. The number of intussusception cases reported to date after RotaTeq administration does not exceed the number we would expect to occur without vaccination. Although the data we have received so far suggests that RotaTeq does not cause intussusception, it is possible that because of incomplete reporting of cases to VAERS and other factors, some increased risk of intussusception associated with RotaTeq vaccination could yet be found. Thus, CDC and FDA are continuing to carefully monitor reports of possible adverse effects of the vaccine.

* Have the recommendations regarding RotaTeq vaccination changed?
No. This notice does not mean there is a problem with the vaccine. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has not made any changes to the RotaTeq vaccination guidelines, and CDC is not changing its policy at this time. ACIP recommends routine immunization of all U.S. infants with three doses of RotaTeq administered orally at ages 2, 4, and 6 months. ACIP will discuss this report at its February meeting.

It is important to remember that the known benefits of the vaccine in preventing rotavirus disease—the cause of one of our most common and potentially severe childhood illnesses—far outweigh any known risks to date.

* How can I report any serious side effects following vaccination with RotaTeq or other vaccines?
Adverse reactions and other problems related to vaccines should be reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System, which is administered by CDC and the FDA. For a copy of the vaccine adverse event reporting form, call (800) 822-7967, or report online at http://www.vaers.hhs.gov

Related information:

[For] February 2006 information on CDC's Advisory Committee Recommendation of a New Vaccine to Prevent Rotavirus, consult CDC's Press Release
[http://www.cdc.gov/nip/news/pr/pr_rotavirus_feb2006.htm] and
Questions and Answers about Rotavirus
[http://www.cdc.gov/nip/diseases/rota/rota-faqs.htm]. Also, the MMWR dated August 11, 2006 (Volume 55): Prevention of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis Among Infants and Children
[http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5512a1.htm].


To access the CDC information issued on 2/14/07, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/vaccine/rota/rotateq_2-07.htm

To access the FDA Public Health Notification, go to:
http://www.fda.gov/cber/safety/phnrota021307.htm

To access WHO's "Statement on RotaTeq vaccine and intussusception," go to:
http://www.who.int/vaccine_safety/topics/rotavirus/rotateq_statement/en/print.html

To access PATH's statement, "FDA issues information update on rotavirus vaccine," go to:
http://www.rotavirus.org/RotaFlash_FDA_Feb2007_000.htm

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2 National Influenza Vaccine Summit announces recipients of the 2007 Immunization Excellence Awards

On February 14, the National Influenza Vaccine Summit issued a press release announcing the winners of its 2007 Immunization Excellence Awards. A portion of the press release is reprinted below.


The National Influenza Vaccine Summit announces the recipients of the first Annual National Influenza Vaccine Summit (NIVS) Immunization Excellence Awards: Overall 2006-07 Season Activity: The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore, Maryland; Healthcare Worker Campaign: Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington; and Late-Season Activities: GetAFluShot.com, Portland, Oregon.

The awards recognize individuals and organizations that have made extraordinary contributions towards improved adult and/or childhood influenza vaccination rates within their communities. The awards will be presented at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Immunization Conference on March 5, 2007, in Kansas City, MO.

To access the entire press release, go to:
http://www.preventinfluenza.org/newsr_award.pdf

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3 Reminder: Be sure to continue administering influenza vaccine during the early months of 2007

Remember, influenza vaccination should continue through the early months of 2007. Visit the following websites often to find the information you need to keep vaccinating. Both are continually updated with the latest resources.

The National Influenza Vaccine Summit website at
http://www.preventinfluenza.org

CDC's Influenza web section at http://www.cdc.gov/flu

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4 Infectious Diseases in Children publishes two-part report on the challenges of vaccination reimbursement

In its January and February issues, Infectious Diseases in Children published a two-part report on the challenges of vaccination reimbursement. The report developed from a round-table discussion held in October 2006 during an AAP meeting held in Atlanta. Following are links to both parts of the report.

To access a web-text (HTML) version of the first part of the report, "Pediatric Practitioners Feeling the Squeeze: The first part of this round table highlights the problem that many pediatricians face—keeping up with the ever-changing vaccine administration schedule and getting reimbursed," go to:
http://www.idinchildren.com/200701/frameset.asp?article=roundtable.asp

To access a web-text (HTML) version of the second part of the report, "Experts Propose Solutions to the Vaccine Reimbursement Issue: The second part of this round table highlights the importance of setting standards for vaccine reimbursement," go to:
http://www.idinchildren.com/200702/frameset.asp?article=roundtable.asp

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5 IAC's hepatitis website celebrates its six-year anniversary

IAC's hepatitis website, www.hepprograms.org, was launched in March 2001 as part of a cooperative agreement with CDC's Division of Viral Hepatitis. The site features programs successfully preventing hepatitis A, B, and/or C in individuals at risk of infection. The content is targeted toward public health and social service managers who might be able to use the information to start or improve hepatitis prevention programs. Currently, the site highlights 90 programs in 10 risk categories.

Many programs have been added recently. To access a detailed list of new additions, go to:
http://www.hepprograms.org/hepexpress/issue52.asp#n1

To access the homepage of the hepprograms website, go to:
http://www.hepprograms.org

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6 February 14 issue of IAC's Hep Express electronic newsletter available online

The February 14 issue of Hep Express, an electronic newsletter published by IAC, is now available online. It is intended for health professionals, program planners, and advocates involved in prevention, screening, and treatment of viral hepatitis.

IAC Express has already covered some of the information presented in the February 14 Hep Express; titles of articles we have not yet covered follow.

  • Hepatitis B Foundation's B Connected newsletter provides information about living well with hepatitis
  • PKIDS' Virtual Connections online community supports families affected by chronic infectious disease
  • Rhode Island expands its perinatal hepatitis B prevention program to include hepatitis C prevention
  • LiverHope provides information and support for people with hepatitis
  • Washington State Asian Pacific Islander Hepatitis B Task Force meeting set for March 8

To access the February 14 issue, go to:
http://www.hepprograms.org/hepexpress/issue52.asp

To sign up for a free subscription to Hep Express, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/subscribe

To access previous issues of Hep Express, go to:
http://www.hepprograms.org/hepexpress

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7 CDC outlines differences in HPV vaccination recommendations issued by ACIP and the American Cancer Society

CDC recently prepared a document outlining the differences in the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination recommendations issued by ACIP and the American Cancer Society (ACS). A portion of the document is reprinted below.


ACS and ACIP recommendations are similar. Both recommend vaccination targeting 11- to 12-year-old females. The ACS recommendations differ from ACIP in that ACS recommends catch-up vaccination of 13- to 18-year-old females; ACIP recommends catch-up vaccination of 13- to 26-year-old females.

To access the entire CDC document, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/cdc/acs-acip.htm

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8 February issue of CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter available online

The February issue of Immunization Works, a monthly email newsletter published by CDC, is available on NIP's website. The newsletter offers members of the immunization community non-proprietary information about current topics. CDC encourages its wide dissemination.

Some of the information in the February issue has already appeared in previous issues of IAC Express. Following is the text of five articles we have not covered.


LEAD ARTICLE

CDC BEGINS CENTRALIZED VACCINE DISTRIBUTION ROLL-OUT. On February 5, 2007, a three-year initiative to centralize pediatric vaccine distribution will begin its final phase: implementing the new distribution process. This initiative, known as the Vaccine Management Business Improvement Project (VMBIP), began with the creation of a team to review all elements of the vaccine supply chain that supports 64 state and local immunization programs (e.g., states, territories, and 6 city grantees). The major goals of this effort have been to

1. Simplify processes for the ordering, distribution, and management of vaccines to be able to respond more quickly and effectively to public health crises related to disease outbreaks, vaccine shortages, and disruptions of the vaccine supply.

2. Implement a more efficient vaccine distribution system.

3. Reduce the lead time between orders for vaccine and delivery of vaccine, as well as enable the direct delivery of vaccines to providers.

Implementation of centralized vaccine distribution will begin with four pilot grantees: California, Chicago, Maryland, and Washington. Once the process has been tested in the four pilot sites, the program will be expanded to other state and local programs in two phases: (1) third-party consolidation, which primarily includes programs that currently contract out their distribution to a third-party distributor; and (2) in-house consolidation, which includes the remaining programs that currently distribute vaccine using their own vaccine storage facilities and staff. The entire implementation period will last from February 2007 through March 2008.

In addition to the physical flow of vaccine, information flows are also being improved. One of the major elements for completion of the implementation process will be the creation of a new Vaccine Ordering Distribution System (VODS) that will support the ordering and management of vaccines. Unlike the current ordering system, VODS will allow providers to place vaccine orders directly into a web-based ordering system. For more information about the VMBIP initiatives visit http://www.cdc.gov/nip/vmbip/default.htm


OTHER NEWS AND SUMMARIES

NEW MEDICAL CODING STANDARD FOR VAERS. January 17, 2007, marked a significant milestone for the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), the nation's frontline vaccine safety surveillance system jointly administered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Since its inception in November 1990, VAERS had used the FDA's Coding Symbols for a Thesaurus of Adverse Reaction Terms (COSTART) medical coding terminology. On January 17, VAERS transitioned to the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) system for medical coding of adverse event case reports. This change is expected to enhance vaccine safety monitoring by improving the description and analysis of adverse event case reports. MedDRA is an internationally accepted medical terminology system [that] provides improved sensitivity for characterizing symptoms and adverse events through the provision of more than 63,000 lower-level terms (LLTs). It also promotes improved standardization in the representation of distinct medical concepts through the provision of more than 17,000 preferred terms (PTs). For more information on VAERS and MedDRA coding, please visit the respective websites at http://www.vaers.hhs.gov and http://meddramsso.com/MSSOWeb


PREPARE FOR NATIONAL INFANT IMMUNIZATION WEEK, 2007. National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW) will be held April 21-28, 2007, to promote, through community events and media activities, the benefits of immunizations and to highlight the importance of vaccinating children by the age of 2. "Love them. Protect them. Immunize them." is the theme for this year's observance. CDC is providing Technical Assistance (TA) to aid program coordinators, health departments, coalitions, and others in their efforts to disseminate NIIW messages. English and Spanish-language resources, supporting local NIIW activities are available online at http://www.cdc.gov/nip/events/niiw CDC is also offering two teleconferences to provide information about NIIW activities and resources.

Teleconferences dates:
March 13 at 12PM–1PM (ET)
March 14 at 3PM–4PM (ET)

To register for the teleconference and receive connection information and materials, email Cindy Fowler at ctg7@cdc.gov Please include the teleconference date and time and put "Campaign Teleconference Registration" in the subject line of the email.

Let us know what you are doing to promote childhood immunization during the week of April 21-28, and find out how others will celebrate NIIW. Add your events to the national NIIW event listing located at
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/events/niiw/2007/activity_form.htm


JOIN THE BRIGHTON COLLABORATION. The Brighton Collaboration, an activity of the Immunization Safety Office (ISO), would like to invite healthcare professionals to join the newly established Bell's Palsy Working Group. In an effort to ensure comparability of future studies of Bell's palsy as a potential adverse event following immunization (AEFI), the Brighton Collaboration aims to develop a case definition and guidelines that would standardize vaccine safety data. Active involvement in the Working Group would entail participation in monthly one-hour conference calls and email correspondence. Additionally, members are asked to review updated documents that are provided prior to each call. For further details on this process, please visit: http://www.brightoncollaboration.org/internet/en/index/process.html Recruitment for the Working Group will continue through the end of February 2007. To volunteer or for additional questions, please contact us at secretariat@brightoncollaboration.org


MEETINGS, CONFERENCES, AND RESOURCES

AUTOMATIC VIS UPDATES. A new feature has just been added to the Vaccine Information Sheet (VIS) page on the NIP website. This feature is located at the top of the page at http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/vis and it allows individuals to sign up for email notification when changes are made to the VIS web page, including new VISs, as well as updates.


To access the complete February issue, go to:
http://www2.cdc.gov/nip/isd/immunizationworks/february
---------------------------------------------------------------

 

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9 CDC reports on U.S. influenza activity from October 2, 2006, to February 3, 2007

CDC published Update: Influenza Activity—United States, October  1, 2006-February 3, 2007" in the February 16 issue of MMWR. A  portion of the article is reprinted below.
 

 
This report summarizes U.S. influenza activity since the  beginning of the 2006-07 influenza season (October 1, 2006) and  updates the previous summary. Low levels of influenza activity were reported from October through early December. Activity increased from mid-December through the end of the year, declined slightly in early January, and then increased again in mid-January.
 
Viral surveillance
During October 1, 2006-February 3, 2007, World Health Organization (WHO) and National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) collaborating laboratories in the  United States reported testing 83,332 specimens for influenza  viruses, and 6,244 (7.5%) tested positive. Of these, 5,161 (82.7%) were influenza A viruses, and 1,083 (17.3%) were  influenza B viruses. A total of 1,696 (32.9%) of the 5,161  influenza A viruses have been subtyped: 1,507 (88.9%) were  influenza A (H1) viruses, and 189 (11.1%) were influenza A (H3)  viruses. From October 1, 2006, through January 6, 2007, 6.2% of  the subtyped influenza A viruses were A (H3). From January 7  through February 3, the percentage of influenza A viruses  subtyped as A (H3) increased to 16.9%. Although influenza A (H3)  viruses have been identified in all nine surveillance regions,  of the 189 influenza A (H3) viruses reported to CDC this season,  117 (61.9%) were from the Mountain and Pacific regions.
 
Antigenic characterization
CDC has antigenically characterized 161 influenza viruses collected since October 1, 2006, and submitted by U.S. laboratories: 99 influenza A (H1), seven influenza A (H3), and 55 influenza B viruses. Ninety-three (94%) of the influenza A (H1) viruses were characterized as A/New Caledonia/20/99-like, the influenza A (H1) component of the 2006-07 influenza vaccine; six (6%) had reduced titers with ferret antisera produced against A/New Caledonia/20/99. Four (57%) of the seven influenza A (H3) viruses were characterized as A/Wisconsin/67/2005-like, the influenza A (H3) component of the 2006-07 influenza vaccine, and three (43%) had reduced titers with ferret antisera produced against A/Wisconsin/67/2005. Influenza B viruses currently circulating can be divided into two antigenically distinct lineages represented by B/Victoria/02/87 and B/Yamagata/16/88. Thirty-seven (67%) of the 55 influenza B viruses characterized belong to the B/Victoria lineage of viruses: 18 (49%) were similar to B/Ohio/01/2005, the influenza B component of the 2006-07 influenza vaccine, and 19 (51%) had reduced titers with antisera produced against B/Ohio/01/2005. Eighteen (33%) of the 55 influenza B viruses characterized belong to the B/Yamagata lineage of viruses.
 
Influenza-like illness (ILI) surveillance
During the current influenza surveillance season, weekly percentages of patient visits for ILI reported by approximately 1,300 U.S. sentinel providers in 50 states, Chicago, the District of Columbia, New York City, and the U.S. Virgin Islands have ranged from 1.0 to 3.2%. The national percentage of outpatient visits for ILI during 7 weeks was above the national baseline of 2.1%. For the week ending February 3, 2007, eight of the nine influenza surveillance regions reported ILI at or above their region-specific baselines. . . .
 
Pneumonia and influenza-related mortality
Pneumonia and influenza (P&I) was listed as an underlying or contributing cause of death for 7.4% of all deaths reported through the 122 Cities Mortality Reporting System for the week ending February 3, 2007. During the current influenza season, the weekly percentage of deaths associated with P&I has ranged from 5.6% to 7.5% but has not exceeded the epidemic threshold.
 
Influenza-associated pediatric hospitalizations
Pediatric hospitalizations associated with laboratory-confirmed influenza infections are monitored in two population-based surveillance networks, the Emerging Infections Program (EIP) and the New Vaccine Surveillance Network (NVSN). From October 1, 2006, through January 20, 2007, the preliminary laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated hospitalization rate reported by EIP sites for children aged 0-17 years was 0.13 per 10,000 (0.34 per 10,000 children aged 0-4 years and 0.05 per 10,000 children aged 5-17 years). From November 5, 2006, through January 20, 2007, the preliminary laboratory-confirmed influenza associated hospitalization rate for children aged 0-4 years in NVSN was 0.63 per 10,000 children.
 
Influenza-related pediatric mortality
For the 2006-07 influenza season, nine influenza-related pediatric deaths have been reported from six states (Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, New York, Ohio, and Texas) through the CDC Influenza-Associated Pediatric Mortality Surveillance System. Children ranged in age from 3 months to 14 years (mean: 7.5 years). Five children were male, and four were female. All patients tested positive for influenza A virus; two specimens were further subtyped as influenza A (H1) virus. . . .
 
 
To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5606a3.htm
 
To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5606.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

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10.  CDC's Influenza web section updates five resources on seasonal influenza

CDC recently updated five pages on its Influenza web section:

  • "Fact Sheet: Influenza symptoms, protection, and what to do if  you get sick" (2/14/07)
  • "Antiviral Drugs and Influenza" (2/14/07)
  • "Questions and Answers: Information for schools" (2/13/07)
  • "Infection Control Guidance for the Prevention and Control of  Influenza in Acute-Care Facilities" (2/8/07)
  • "Infection Control Measures for Preventing and Controlling  Influenza Transmission in Long-Term Care Facilities" (2/6/07)

To access these resources, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/whatsnew.htm#updated and click on the pertinent link.
 
To access a broad range of continually updated information on seasonal influenza, avian influenza, pandemic influenza, and swine influenza, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/flu

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11.  National Viral Hepatitis Training Center announces 2007 training dates

[The following is cross posted from IAC's Hep Express electronic newsletter, 2/14/07]

The National Viral Hepatitis Training Center at the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) is funded by CDC to develop and provide training related to integrating viral hepatitis prevention into settings that serve people at high risk of infection.
 
"It's Time: Integrate viral hepatitis into your work" is a two-day training tailored for staff working in settings that serve people at high risk for viral hepatitis, including substance use programs, HIV/AIDS programs, correctional settings, and public health/STD clinics. The training provides individuals working in these settings with tools and skills to integrate hepatitis prevention, education, and counseling services into existing programs.

The center also offers a related Training of Trainers (TOT) program. Upon successful completion of the TOT, more than 70 agencies have been authorized to offer the "It's Time" training. Authorized training agencies can train their own staff and other providers in their region.
 
In 2007, the National Viral Hepatitis Training Center will offer the entire "It's Time" training and TOT in three locations:
 
Chicago, Illinois: April 2–5, 2007
Albany, New York: June 4-7, 2007
West coast training to be offered in September 2007
 
For more information on registering for a training or becoming an authorized training agency, please contact mag20@health.state.ny.us or visit the NYSDOH website at http://www.health.state.ny.us/diseases/aids/training/viralhepatitis.htm

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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.