Home
|
About IAC
|
Contact
|
A-Z Index
|
Donate
|
Shop
|
SUBSCRIBE
Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2007
Issue number 641: January 22, 2007
 
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. Correction: MMWR corrects an error in the vaccination schedule for persons ages 0-18 years
  2. Reminder: Be sure to continue administering influenza vaccine during the early months of 2007
  3. Update: IAC revises five professional educational materials
  4. New: CDC announces addition of influenza module to its "You Call the Shots" training course
  5. CDC adds three new pieces to its Influenza web section
  6. New book traces the history of vaccination and the development of the movement against immunization
  7. Women In Government issues progress report on cervical cancer prevention efforts in the U.S.
  8. Attention readers: PKIDS needs you to share your success stories about changing teens' health habits
  9. HHS awards contracts to vaccine manufacturers for advanced development of H5N1 influenza vaccine
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 641: January 22, 2007
1.  Correction: MMWR corrects an error in the vaccination schedule for persons ages 0-18 years

CDC published "Erratum: Vol. 55, Nos. 51 & 52" in the January 19 issue of MMWR. The article is reprinted below in its entirety.


In the MMWR QuickGuide "Recommended Immunization Schedules for Persons Aged 0-18 Years—United States, 2007," an error occurred in the first sentence of the second bullet of footnote 10 under Figure 2 on page Q-3. The sentence should read, "Administer 2 doses of varicella vaccine to persons aged <13 years at least 3 months apart."


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5602a6.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5602.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

Back to top
   
2 Reminder: Be sure to continue administering influenza vaccine during the early months of 2007

Remember, influenza vaccination should continue through the early months of 2007. Visit the following websites often to find the information you need to keep vaccinating. Both are continually updated with the latest resources.

The National Influenza Vaccine Summit website at http://www.preventinfluenza.org

CDC's Influenza web section at http://www.cdc.gov/flu

Back to top
   
3 Update: IAC revises five professional educational materials

IAC recently revised five of its education materials for healthcare professionals. CDC reviewed all revised materials for technical content. Following is a list of the updated materials; it explains the changes made to each and provides links to each.

(1) Extensive changes were made to "Healthcare Worker Vaccination Recommendations." Specifically the sections on recommendations for the following vaccines were changed: measles-mumps-rubella; tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis; and varicella.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the revised piece, go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2017.pdf

(2) On the piece "Standing Orders for Administering Varicella Vaccine to Children & Teens," information was added about the recommendation to provide two doses of the vaccine.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the revised piece, go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3080a.pdf

(3) On the piece "Administering Vaccines: Dose, route, site, and needle size," information on the needle length for intramuscular administration to infants was changed to reflect the revisions made to ACIP's General Immunization Recommendations, which were issued in December 2006.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the revised piece, go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3085.pdf

(4 & 5) "Temperature Log for Vaccines (Fahrenheit)" and "Temperature Log for Vaccines (Celsius)" were extensively reformatted and revised. IAC thanks the Michigan Department of Community Health for allowing us to adapt these pieces and the California Department of Health Services for suggestions for revision.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the revised Fahrenheit log, go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3039.pdf

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the revised Celsius log, go to: http://www.immunize.org/news.d/celsius.pdf

Back to top
   
4 New: CDC announces addition of influenza module to its "You Call the Shots" training course

CDC recently announced the addition of an influenza module to the web-based training course "Immunization: You Call the Shots." This module discusses influenza infection, the influenza vaccine, and recommendations for vaccine use. Extra learning opportunities, self-test practice questions, reference and resource materials, and a glossary are all provided.

For additional information on "You Call the Shots," go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/ed/youcalltheshots.htm

To access the influenza module, go to:
http://www2.cdc.gov/nip/isd/ycts/mod1/courses/flu/start.asp

Back to top
   
5 CDC adds three new pieces to its Influenza web section

CDC recently added new materials to its Influenza web section:

(1) "Cover Your Cough" flyers and posters are available for public health settings and for community and public settings such as schools and child care facilities. Translations are now available in several languages in addition to English: Spanish, Portuguese, French, Vietnamese, Tagalog, Chinese, Hmong, and Khmer.

(2) "Questions & Answers: Vaccine effectiveness (How well does the influenza or "flu" vaccine work?)"

(3) "Flu Vaccine Effectiveness: Questions & answers for health professionals"

To access these materials, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/whatsnew.htm#new and click on the pertinent links.

To access a broad range of continually updated information on seasonal influenza, avian influenza, pandemic influenza, and swine influenza, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/flu

Back to top
   
6 New book traces the history of vaccination and the development of the movement against immunization

Written by journalist Arthur Allen, "Vaccine: The controversial story of medicine's greatest lifesaver," traces the history of vaccination and the development of the movement against immunization. The publisher, W.W. Norton and Company, describes the scope of the book in these words:

"In this deftly written account, journalist Arthur Allen reveals a history of vaccination that is both illuminated with hope and shrouded by controversy—from Jenner's discovery to Pasteur's vaccines for rabies and cholera, to those that safeguarded the children of the twentieth century, and finally to the tumult currently surrounding vaccination."

To learn more about the book, go to:
http://www2.wwnorton.com/catalog/fall06/005911.htm

To order from the publisher, go to: http://www2.wwnorton.com/area4/order.htm or call (800) 233-4830.

The book, which retails for $27.95, is available at bookstores nationwide.

Back to top
   
7 Women In Government issues progress report on cervical cancer prevention efforts in the U.S.

On January 16, Women In Government issued a press release on its report "Partnering for Progress 2007: The 'state' of cervical cancer prevention in America." Portions of the press release are reprinted below.


A new report shows that states are making significant progress in the fight against cervical cancer, but still face dramatic racial disparities in cervical cancer incidence, mortality and screening rates, and a lack of access to care for low-income women. These shortfalls point to healthcare gaps that may prevent all women from benefiting from breakthrough new screening and prevention technologies. The findings are from "Partnering for Progress 2007: the 'State' of Cervical Cancer Prevention in America," the third annual state-by-state comparison report released today by Women In Government, a non-profit, bi-partisan organization representing women state legislators.

The report looked at current data for each state on cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates; screening rates, including [those] for low-income women; women's access to screening using the most up-to-date technology; rates of uninsured women; and the legislative priority being put on this issue. . . .

"Our new report shows that the states are making impressive gains in the fight against cervical cancer. . . ., said Susan Crosby, president of Women In Government. "However, minority and underserved women are being left behind in states' prevention efforts. Now, with breakthrough technologies, such as a vaccine against the human papillomavirus, or HPV, the virus that causes cervical cancer, as well as an FDA-approved HPV test for use in screening, we have a tremendous opportunity to actually eliminate cervical cancer. . . .


To read the press release in its entirety, go to:
http://www.womeningovernment.org/home/documents/FinalStateReportPressRelease1-16-07.pdf

To learn about Women In Government's multi-year campaign to eliminate cervical center, go to:
http://www.womeningovernment.org/prevention

To learn more about the organization, go to:
http://www.womeningovernment.org

Back to top
   
8 Attention readers: PKIDS needs you to share your success stories about changing teens' health habits

Parents of Kids with Infectious Diseases (PKIDS) is asking IAC Express readers to steer it toward individuals and/or organizations that have successfully connected with teens and their care givers to change teens' health habits in a positive way.

As part of its Teen Vaccine Initiative, PKIDS plans to collect a list of outreach programs and stories (formal and informal; research supported and anecdotal) that illustrate how to connect with teens and their care givers to change teen health habits. The collection will be available to anyone interested in learning what others are doing in this area.

Though PKIDS' goal is to raise teen immunization rates, it would like to learn about successful attempts at changing teens' health habits in general, not just in the area of immunization.

If you have your own success stories, or know of people or organizations that do, please provide PKIDS with contact information. Email PKIDS at pkids@pkids.org or phone (877) 557-5437.

To learn more about PKIDS, go to: http://www.pkids.org

Back to top
   
9 HHS awards contracts to vaccine manufacturers for advanced development of H5N1 influenza vaccine

On January 17, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a press release announcing that it has awarded contracts to vaccine manufacturers for advance development of H5N1 influenza vaccine. Portions of the press release are reprinted below.


HHS Secretary Mike Leavitt announced today that the department has awarded contracts totaling $132.5 million to three vaccine makers for the advanced development of H5N1 influenza vaccines
. . . .

The Department has awarded five-year contracts to GlaxoSmithKline for $63.3 million and to Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics, Inc.,` for $54.8 million. In addition, HHS is funding IOMAI Corporation for $14.4 million for 15 months to complete Phase 1 clinical trials of their candidate vaccine. . .
.
Overall the three contracts support advanced development work through Phase 3 clinical trials in the U.S. that are aimed at obtaining U.S. licensure for the product. In addition, the contracts support the establishment of U.S.-based manufacturing capabilities. . . .

To access the entire press release, go to:
http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2007pres/20070117a.html

Back to top
   
Immunization Action Coalition  •  Saint Paul, MN
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.