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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2006
Issue number 637: December 18, 2006
 
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. Happy holidays from all of us at IAC
  2. CDC issues ACIP recommendations for preventing tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis in adults and the ACIP/HICPAC recommendations for healthcare personnel
  3. VIS translations: VISs for influenza vaccines now in Arabic; interim VIS for HPV vaccine now in Thai
  4. Submissions for Moorehouse's Best Practices for Eliminating Adult Immunization Disparities contest due January 19, 2007
  5. Reminder: Be sure to continue administering influenza vaccines throughout December and into 2007
  6. CDC reports on influenza vaccination coverage among children ages 6-23 months during the 2005-06 influenza season
  7. CDC reports that 56 percent of children under age six participated in Immunization Information Systems in 2005
  8. December 22 is the deadline for submitting abstracts for the 2007 Northwest Immunization Conference
  9. CDC reports on U.S. public health surveillance for smallpox during 2003-05
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NIP, National Immunization Program; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 637: December 18, 2006
1.  Happy holidays from all of us at IAC

All of us at IAC wish the readers of IAC Express a safe, happy, and relaxing holiday season—free from influenza.

This is our last issue for 2006. We'll email you the next issue on January 2, 2007.

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2 CDC issues ACIP recommendations for preventing tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis in adults and the ACIP/HICPAC recommendations for healthcare personnel

CDC published "Preventing Tetanus, Diphtheria, and Pertussis Among Adults: Use of Tetanus Toxoid, Reduced Diphtheria Toxoid, and Acellular Pertussis Vaccine: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and Recommendation of ACIP, Supported by the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC), for Use of Tdap Among Healthcare Personnel" in the December 15 issue of MMWR Recommendations and Reports. The summary is reprinted below.


On June 10, 2005, a tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) formulated for use in adults and adolescents was licensed in the United States for persons aged 11-64 years (ADACEL, manufactured by sanofi pasteur, Toronto, Ontario, Canada). Prelicensure studies demonstrated safety and efficacy, inferred through immunogenicity, against tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis when Tdap was administered as a single booster dose to adults. To reduce pertussis morbidity among adults and maintain the standard of care for tetanus and diphtheria prevention and to reduce the transmission of pertussis to infants and in health-care settings, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that: (1) adults aged 19-64 years should receive a single dose of Tdap to replace tetanus and diphtheria toxoids vaccine (Td) for booster immunization against tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis if they received their last dose of Td >=10 years earlier and they have not previously received Tdap; (2) intervals shorter than 10 years since the last Td may be used for booster protection against pertussis; (3) adults who have or who anticipate having close contact with an infant aged <12 months (e.g., parents, grandparents aged <65 years, child-care providers, and healthcare personnel) should receive a single dose of Tdap to reduce the risk for transmitting pertussis. An interval as short as 2 years from the last Td is suggested; shorter intervals can be used. When possible, women should receive Tdap before becoming pregnant. Women who have not previously received Tdap should receive a dose of Tdap in the immediate postpartum period; (4) healthcare personnel who work in hospitals or ambulatory care settings and have direct patient contact should receive a single dose of Tdap as soon as feasible if they have not previously received Tdap. An interval as short as 2 years from the last dose of Td is recommended; shorter intervals may be used. These recommendations for use of Tdap in healthcare personnel are supported by the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC). This statement (1) reviews pertussis, tetanus, and diphtheria vaccination policy in the United States; (2) describes the clinical features and epidemiology of pertussis among adults; (3) summarizes the immunogenicity, efficacy, and safety data of Tdap; and (4) presents recommendations for the use of Tdap among adults aged 19-64 years. . . .


To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version ACIP's adult Tdap recommendations, which includes Appendices A, B, and C, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/rr/rr5517.pdf

Note: The PDF version includes a free CDC-sponsored education activity that can be completed online or submitted by U.S. mail for CME, CEU, CNE, CHES, or CPE credit. Simply read the primer, answer the questions at the end, and follow instructions for submitting your answers.

If you prefer the HTML version, you must access all four links below to get the full content:

To access a web-text (HTML) version of the body of the recommendations, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5517a1.htm

To access a web-text (HTML) version of Appendix A: Summary of Recommendations for Tetanus Toxoid, Reduced Diphtheria Toxoid, and Acellular Pertussis Vaccine (Tdap) Use Among Adults, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5517a2.htm

To access a web-text (HTML) version of Appendix B: CDC and Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) Pertussis Case Definition, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5517a3.htm

To access a web-text (HTML) version of Appendix C: Abbreviations Used in This Report, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5517a4.htm

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

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3 VIS translations: VISs for influenza vaccines now in Arabic; interim VIS for HPV vaccine now in Thai

Dated 6/30/06, the current version of the VISs for trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV; injectable) and live attenuated intranasal vaccine (LAIV; nasal spray) are now available on the IAC website in Arabic. Dated 9/5/06, the interim VIS for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is now available in Thai. IAC gratefully acknowledges the California Department of Health Services for the Arabic translations and Asian Pacific Health Care Venture, Inc., for the Thai translation.

VIS FOR TIV
To obtain a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the VIS for TIV in Arabic, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/ab_flu06.pdf

To obtain it in English, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/#influenza

VIS FOR LAIV
To obtain a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the VIS for LAIV in Arabic, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/abLAIV06.pdf

To obtain it in English, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/liveflu.pdf

INTERIM VIS FOR HPV VACCINE
To obtain a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the interim VIS for HPV vaccine in Thai, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/th_hpv.pdf

To obtain it in English, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/vis-hpv-gardasil.pdf`

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in more than 30 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis

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4 Submissions for Moorehouse's Best Practices for Eliminating Adult Immunization Disparities contest due January 19, 2007

The Moorehouse School of Medicine recently announced its first Call for Best Practices in Eliminating Adult Immunization Disparities contest. The deadline for submissions is January 19, 2007.

The goal of the contest is to share and recognize effective adult immunization projects and programs that have had success in reducing racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in adult influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations. The practices submitted for consideration should be adaptable to other organizations and must have achieved specific, measurable results. The best practices selected will be stored with open access to other adult immunization projects and programs.

For comprehensive information about the contest and an application form, go to: http://www.msm.edu/ncpc and click on the words "Learn More."

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5 Reminder: Be sure to continue administering influenza vaccines throughout December and into 2007

Remember, influenza vaccination should continue through the month of December and beyond! Visit the following websites often to find the information you need to keep vaccinating. Both are continually updated with the latest resources.

The National Influenza Vaccine Summit website at  http://www.preventinfluenza.org

CDC's Influenza web section at http://www.cdc.gov/flu

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6 CDC reports on influenza vaccination coverage among children ages 6-23 months during the 2005-06 influenza season

CDC published "Brief Report: Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Children Aged 6-23 Months—Six Immunization Information System Sentinel Sites, United States, 2005-06 Influenza Season" in the December 15 issue of MMWR. The introductory paragraph is reprinted below.


Beginning with the 2004-05 influenza season, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended that all children aged 6-23 months receive influenza vaccinations annually. Other children recommended to receive influenza vaccinations include those aged 6 months-18 years who have certain high-risk medical conditions, those on chronic aspirin therapy, those who are household contacts of persons at high risk for influenza complications, and, since 2006, all children aged 24-59 months. Previously unvaccinated children aged <9 years need 2 doses administered at least 1 month apart to be considered fully vaccinated. This report assesses influenza vaccination coverage among children aged 6-23 months during the 2005-06 influenza season by using data from six immunization information system (IIS) sentinel sites. The findings demonstrate that vaccination coverage with 1 or more doses varied widely (range: 6.6% to 60.4%) among sites, with coverage increasing from the preceding influenza season in four of the six sites. However, <23% of children in five of the sites were fully vaccinated, underscoring the need for increased measures to improve the proportion of children who are fully vaccinated. . . .


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5549a4.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5549.pdf

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7 CDC reports that 56 percent of children under age six participated in Immunization Information Systems in 2005

CDC published "Immunization Information Systems Progress—United States, 2005" in the December 15 issue of MMWR. The introductory paragraph is reprinted below.


Immunization registries are confidential, computerized information systems that collect and consolidate vaccination data from multiple healthcare providers, generate reminder and recall notifications, and assess vaccination coverage within a defined geographic area. A registry with added capabilities, such as vaccine management, adverse event reporting, lifespan vaccination histories, and linkages with electronic data sources, is called an immunization information system (IIS). This report summarizes data from CDC's 2005 Immunization Information System Annual Report (IISAR), a survey of grantees in 50 states, five cities, and the District of Columbia (DC) that receive funding under section 317b of the Public Health Service Act. These data indicated that approximately 56% of U.S. children aged <6 years participated in an IIS, an increase from 48% in 2004. Moreover, 75% percent of public vaccination provider sites and 44% of private vaccination provider sites submitted vaccination data to an IIS during July-December 2005. These findings underscore the need to increase the number of participating children, from the current 13 million to approximately 21 million, to assure 95% participation of children aged <6 years and improve the effectiveness of U.S. immunization programs. . . .


To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5549a3.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5549.pdf

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8 December 22 is the deadline for submitting abstracts for the 2007 Northwest Immunization Conference

December 22 is the deadline for submitting abstracts for the 2007 Northwest Immunization Conference. Scheduled for May 15-16, the conference will be held in Portland, OR.

For information on abstract submission, go to:
https://www.regonline.com/setup/custImages/241929/2007%20Call%20.doc

To submit an abstract online, go to:
https://www.regonline.com/setup/custImages/241929/abstract%20submit%202007.doc

For comprehensive information on the conference, go to:
http://www.regonline.com/Checkin.asp?EventId=105809

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9 CDC reports on U.S. public health surveillance for smallpox during 2003-05

CDC published "Public Health Surveillance for Smallpox—United States, 2003-2005" in the December 15 issue of MMWR. A portion of the press summary is reprinted below.


Recommendations are made for continued advancement of disease reporting, early event detection systems, and targeted training. Several factors have contributed to the ability of state health departments to conduct surveillance and respond to suspected smallpox cases. These factors include new reporting requirements and surveillance systems, access to local and reference laboratory facilities, modes of communication to receive information, and training of public health professionals and healthcare practitioners. The findings from the CSTE [Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists] survey show that, in the event of suspected smallpox, the public health infrastructure has the key components in place to detect, receive reports of, investigate, and confirm or rule out the disease.

To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5549a2.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5549.pdf

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Immunization Action Coalition  •  1573 Selby Ave  •  St. Paul, MN 55104
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.