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Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Express 2006
Issue number 627: October 30, 2006
 
Contents of this Issue
Select a title to jump to the article.
  1. New: ACIP votes to recommend Herpes zoster (shingles) vaccine for adults age 60 years and older
  2. Mark your calendar: CDC schedules the live satellite broadcast Adult Immunization 2006 for December 7
  3. Influenza summit's web section posts resources to boost vaccination rates of health workers and others at risk
  4. CDC's web section on HPV infection and vaccine is reformatted; Spanish-language materials are added
  5. NIP revises its interactive immunization scheduler for children age 5 years and younger
  6. CDC update on U.S. mumps activity during 2006 encourages vaccination for those with high risk for exposure
  7. Updated: IAC revises four of its education sheets for health professionals to include new vaccine information
  8. WHO releases its action plan for increasing the vaccine supply to combat a global influenza pandemic
  9. Heads up: The deadline for abstract submission for NFID's Conference on Vaccine Research is February 2, 2007
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NIP, National Immunization Program; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 627: October 30, 2006
1.  New: ACIP votes to recommend Herpes zoster (shingles) vaccine for adults age 60 years and older
 

On October 26, CDC issued a press release announcing that ACIP has voted to recommend herpes zoster (shingles) vaccination for adults age 60 years and older. It is reprinted below in its entirety.
  

For Immediate Release
October 26, 2006

CDC'S ADVISORY COMMITTEE RECOMMENDS "SHINGLES" VACCINATION

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), a federal panel of immunization experts, has recommended people age 60 and older receive a new vaccine to prevent herpes zoster, or shingles, a condition that often leads to debilitating chronic pain.

The ACIP to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) voted Wednesday, October 25, 2006, to recommend a newly licensed zoster vaccine, Zostavax manufactured by Merck, to protect against shingles be given to all people age 60 and older, including those who have had a previous episode of shingles.

"Vaccines aren't just for kids anymore—and this vaccine represents an important medical breakthrough aimed at improving health in older people," said Dr. Anne Schuchat, assistant surgeon general and director of CDC's National Center for Immunizations and Respiratory Diseases. "These vaccine recommendations address a health problem for people age 60 and older. It has been tested and has been found to be safe and effective in providing protection against shingles and associated chronic pain."

Zostavax, the only zoster vaccine on the market, was studied in approximately 38,000 individuals throughout the United States who were age 60 years and older. Half received the vaccine and half received a placebo. Study participants were followed for an average of three years to see if they developed shingles and, if they did, how long the pain lasted. Zostavax reduced the occurrence of shingles by about 50 percent and post herpetic neuralgia (pain persisting after an episode of shingles) by 67 percent.

While the ability for the vaccine to prevent shingles declined with age, the risk of chronic pain among those older vaccinated persons who still developed shingles was lowered. The most common reported side effects in vaccine recipients were mild, such as reactions at the injection site and headache.

Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella, or chickenpox, and becomes dormant within the nerves following exposure or a case of chickenpox. It can reactivate later in life to cause shingles. About 25 percent of people develop zoster during their lifetime, and there are about one million cases of shingles per year. The risk is highest in the elderly, and it increases with age starting at around 50 years. Shingles often causes chronic pain, and the risk of suffering chronic pain increases with age, starting at 60 years. Shingles is much less contagious than chickenpox.

The ACIP, consisting of 15 members appointed by the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), advises the director of CDC and Secretary of HHS on control of vaccine-preventable disease and vaccine usage. Recommendations of the ACIP become CDC policy when they are accepted by the director of CDC and are published in CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR).

 
To access the press release, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/r061026.htm
 
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2.  Mark Your Calendar: CDC schedules the live satellite broadcast Adult Immunization 2006 for December 7

The live satellite broadcast and web cast "Adult Immunization 2006" will update healthcare personnel on current adult immunization recommendations. The 2.5-hour broadcast is scheduled for December 7 from noon to 2:30PM ET. It will feature a live question-and-answer session in which participants nationwide can interact with the course instructors on toll-free telephone lines.

Program. The program covers the following: the burden of vaccine-preventable diseases among adults in the United States, highlights from the 2006-2007 Recommended Adult Immunization Schedule, and strategies to improve adult vaccination coverage levels. It will include a discussion of vaccines routinely recommended for adults, including influenza, pneumococcal, Tdap, human papillomavirus, and herpes zoster. The program will also address vaccines recommended for healthcare personnel and identify resources relevant to vaccine recommendations for international travel.

Faculty. The course instructors are Donna Weaver, MN, RN, and Andrew Kroger, MD, MPH. Both are with the CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.

Audience. The program's intended audience includes physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, Department of Defense paraprofessionals, pharmacists, health educators, and their colleagues who either administer vaccines or set policy for their offices, clinics, or communicable disease or infection control programs. Private and public healthcare providers, including pediatricians, family practice specialists, residents, and medical and nursing students are encouraged to participate.

Registration. Registration is not required. HOWEVER, ONLINE REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED TO RECEIVE CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDITS. To register, go to: http://www2a.cdc.gov/phtnonline Individual registration begins on November 9.

Questions. For additional registration information, email ce@cdc.gov or call (800) 418-7246. For additional program information, email nipinfo@cdc.gov

Web cast. The program will have a live web cast at http://www2a.cdc.gov/PHTN/webcast/adult-imm06

For technical support and to prepare for the web cast ahead of time, go to:
http://www.phppo.cdc.gov/phtn/webcast/webtest/technical.asp

 
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3.  Influenza Summit's web section posts resources to boost vaccination rates of health workers and others at risk

The web section of the National Influenza Vaccine Summit was recently updated with resources for increasing the influenza vaccination rates of healthcare workers and others for whom the vaccine is recommended. These two resources will be of particular interest to IAC Express readers:

(1) National Influenza Vaccine Summit Health Care Worker Home Page, which offers links to information from the federal government and toolkits from national organizations and state health departments. To access it, go to: http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/16633.html

(2) Summit Influenza Immunization Tools for Providers, which offers links to toolkits from national organizations and state health departments, a billing chart, and the summit's Influenza Vaccine Availability Tracking System. To access it, go to: http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/16952.html

The National Influenza Vaccine Summit web section is part of the website of the American Medical Association. In addition to the resources mentioned, it includes presentations from meetings and information about influenza vaccine manufacturing, supply, and distribution. To access the web site, go to http://www.ama-assn.org/go/influenzasummit
 
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4.  CDC's web section on HPV infection and vaccine is reformatted; spanish-language materials are added

The web section on human papillomavirus (HPV) was recently reformatted, and Spanish-language materials were added. The web section now contains links to materials on the following topics:
  • Facts, including fact sheets and Q&As (some in Spanish)
  • Statistics
  • Treatment
  • HPV and cervical cancer
  • HPV vaccine
  • Clinicians' resources
  • Educators' resources (including a slide show, brochure, and poster in Spanish and English)
  • Archives
To access the web section, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/std/hpv
 
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5.  NIP revises its interactive immunization scheduler for children age 5 years and younger

On October 19, the NIP website updated the interactive Childhood Immunization Schedule for children age 5 years and younger. It allows parents to find out which vaccinations their child needs simply by entering the child's birth date. The scheduler is based on the 2006 Childhood and Adolescent Immunization Schedule.

Parents who use the interactive scheduler are cautioned that the information it contains may not be accurate for a child who has a condition that affects the immune system. Parents are also encouraged to consult a clinician for advice on their child's immunization needs.

To access the scheduler, go to:
http://www2a.cdc.gov/nip/kidstuff/newscheduler_le

 
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6.  CDC update on U.S. mumps activity during 2006 encourages vaccination for those with high risk for exposure

CDC published "Brief Report: Update: Mumps Activity—United States, January 1-October 7, 2006" in the October 27 issue of MMWR. Portions of the article are reprinted below.
 

During January 1-October 7, 2006, a total of 45 states and the District of Columbia reported 5,783 confirmed or probable mumps cases to CDC. This includes 2,597 cases previously reported by 11 states during January 1-April 29, 2006. This report summarizes the epidemiology of mumps cases in the United States during 2006. With low levels of reported mumps continuing, healthcare workers should remain alert to suspected mumps, conduct appropriate laboratory testing, and use every opportunity to ensure adequate immunity, particularly among populations at high risk for mumps. . . .

Among the 5,783 cases for which weeks of onset are known, cases peaked during April 16-29, the onset period for 1,498 (26%) cases. The number of reported cases decreased during May-September, when most students were not attending college. However, since students began returning to school in August, mumps clusters have been reported from three college or university campuses in Illinois (84 cases), Kansas (22 cases), and Virginia (12 cases). Most of these cases (96%) were reported in persons who had received 2 doses of MMR [measles, mumps, rubella] vaccine. Because 2 doses of mumps-containing vaccine are not 100% effective in a setting with high vaccination coverage such as the United States, most mumps cases likely will occur in persons who have received the 2 doses. Multiple other factors might have contributed to the spread of the mumps outbreak (e.g., the close-contact environment of college dormitories or varying college admission requirements for MMR vaccination).

Healthcare providers should continue to remain alert for suspected mumps cases, conduct appropriate diagnostic testing, and report these cases to local or state health departments. . . .

In response to this nationwide mumps outbreak, ACIP recommendations for prevention and control of mumps were updated. Evidence of immunity through documentation of vaccination is now defined as 1 dose of live mumps vaccine for preschool-aged children and adults not at high risk for exposure and infection and 2 doses of live mumps vaccine for school-aged children (i.e., grades kindergarten-12) and adults at high risk for exposure and infection (i.e., healthcare workers, international travelers, and students at post-high school education institutions). Additional recommendations for outbreak control include administering a second dose of MMR for preschool children and adults not at high risk for exposure and infection if these persons are part of a group that is experiencing an outbreak. To ensure high levels of immunity, especially among groups at high risk for exposure and infection, every opportunity should be used to provide the first or second dose of MMR vaccine to those without adequate evidence of immunity (e.g., documentation of vaccination). Private healthcare providers, clinics, health departments, healthcare institutions, schools, universities, and colleges should consider offering MMR vaccine through such settings as routine preventive health services and special immunization clinics, including providing MMR in conjunction with influenza vaccine.
 
 
To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5542a3.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5542.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

 
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7.  Updated: IAC revises four of its education sheets for health professionals to Include new vaccine information

IAC recently updated the following education sheets with new vaccine information:

Vaccine Handling Tips: Outdated or Improperly Stored Vaccines Won't Protect Patients! was updated with information about storing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine and zoster (shingles) vaccine. To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the updated piece, go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3048.pdf

Emergency Response Worksheet now reflects a vaccine manufacturer's name change from Chiron Vaccines USA to Novartis Vaccines. To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the updated piece, go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3051.pdf

Suggested Supplies Checklist for Pediatric and Adult Immunization Clinic was reformatted to accommodate listings for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine; rotavirus vaccine; tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) vaccine; measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella (MMRV) vaccine; and zoster (shingles) vaccine. To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the updated piece, go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3046chk.pdf

Suggested Supplies Checklist for Adult Immunization Clinic was reformatted to accommodate listings for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine; tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) vaccine; and zoster (shingles) vaccine. To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the updated piece, go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3047.pdf

 
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8.  WHO releases its action plan for increasing the vaccine supply to combat a global influenza pandemic

On October 23, WHO issued a press release announcing the publication of a document, Global Pandemic Influenza Action Plan to Increase Vaccine Supply. Portions of the press release are reprinted below. A link to the document is given at the end of this IAC Express article.
 
 
A set of activities identified in the World Health Organization's (WHO's) new Global Pandemic Influenza Action Plan to Increase Vaccine Supply requires immediate and sustained action and funding, if the world is to be prepared for an influenza pandemic to which there would be almost universal susceptibility.

"We are presently several billion doses short of the amount of pandemic influenza vaccine we would need to protect the global population. This situation could lead to a public health crisis," said Dr Marie-Paule Kieny, director, WHO Initiative for Vaccine Research. "The Global Action Plan sets the course for what needs to be done, starting now, to increase vaccine production capacity and close the gap. In just three to five years we could begin to see results that could save many lives in case of a pandemic. . . ."
 
 
To access the complete press release, go to:
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2006/pr58/en/index.html

To access the document, go to:
http://www.who.int/vaccines-documents/DocsPDF06/863.pdf

 
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9.  Heads Up: The deadline for abstract submission for NFID's Conference on Vaccine Research is February 2, 2007

The tenth annual Conference on Vaccine Research, sponsored by National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID), will be held in Baltimore on April 30-May 2, 2007. The deadline for abstract submission is February 2, 2007.

To access conference information, including the online abstract submission form and instructions for submitting an abstract, go to: http://www.nfid.org/conferences/vaccine07 and click on the pertinent link(s).
 
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.