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Immunization Action Coalition

IAC Express 2006

Issue number 623: October 2, 2006

Contents of this Issue
  1. Study of more than 2 million children fails to link MMR or DTP vaccination with increased risk for encephalopathy
  2. How's your state doing? 2005 BRFSS provides influenza and pneumococcal vaccination rates for adults age 65 and older
  3. Congratulations! Dr. Nancy Cox, CDC influenza expert, selected as Federal Employee of the Year
  4. Cardiologists strongly encouraged to vaccinate their patients with inactivated influenza vaccine
  5. Updated for 2006-07: Online information and guidance on influenza vaccine, antivirals, lab diagnosis, and more
  6. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) meeting scheduled for October 25-26 in Atlanta
  7. Proceedings from June 2006 ACIP meeting now online
  8. American Public Health Association (APHA) annual meeting planned for Boston on November 4-8
  9. New: September 28 issue of IAC's Hep Express e-newsletter now online
  10. CDC updates online adult and adolescent vaccine quiz for public
  11. New: IAC website posts Turkish-language translations of five patient-education pieces
  12. 2006-07 Spanish-language VIS for inactivated influenza vaccine now available in audio and video formats
 
Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NIP, National Immunization Program; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
  
Issue 623: October 2, 2006
1.  October 2, 2006
STUDY OF MORE THAN 2 MILLION CHILDREN FAILS TO LINK MMR OR DTP VACCINATION WITH INCREASED RISK FOR ENCEPHALOPATHY


A study of the health records of more than 2 million children in four U.S. health maintenance organizations revealed that those who were vaccinated with MMR or DTP vaccine were no more likely to develop encephalopathy than were children who had not received the vaccines. Titled "Encephalopathy after whole-cell pertussis or measles vaccination: Lack of evidence for a causal association in a retrospective case-control study," the study results were published in the September 2006 issue of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal (PIDJ). The abstract is reprinted below in its entirety.

ABSTRACT:

Background: Whole-cell pertussis (wP) and measles vaccines are effective in preventing disease but have also been suspected of increasing the risk of encephalopathy or encephalitis. Although many countries now use acellular pertussis vaccines, wP vaccine is still widely used in the developing world. It is therefore important to evaluate whether wP vaccine increases the risk of neurologic disorders.

Methods: A retrospective case-control study was performed at 4 health maintenance organizations. Records from January 1, 1981, through December 31, 1995, were examined to identify children aged 0 to 6 years old hospitalized with encephalopathy or related conditions. The cause of the encephalopathy was categorized as known, unknown, or suspected but unconfirmed. Up to 3 controls were matched to each case. Conditional logistic regression was used to analyze the relative risk of encephalopathy after vaccination with diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) or measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccines in the 90 days before disease onset as defined by chart review compared with an equivalent period among controls indexed by matching on case onset date.

Results: Four-hundred fifty-two cases were identified. Cases were no more likely than controls to have received either vaccine during the 90 days before disease onset. When encephalopathies of known etiology were excluded, the odds ratio for case children having received DTP within 7 days before onset of disease was 1.22 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.45-3.31, P = 0.693) compared with control children. For MMR in the 90 days before onset of encephalopathy, the odds ratio was 1.23 (95% confidence interval = 0.51-2.98, P = 0.647).

Conclusions: In this study of more than 2 million children, DTP and MMR vaccines were not associated with an increased risk of encephalopathy after vaccination.


To access the abstract, go to the PIDJ homepage at: http://www.pidj.com Click on the Archive tab at the top of the page. You will be taken to an index of volumes. Click on the link titled September 2006 to go to the issue's table of contents. Under the heading Original Studies, click in box 768 to the left of the article titles. Then, click on the Abstract link to the right of the pertinent title. The full text is available to PIDJ subscribers.

 
 
 
 
2.  October 2, 2006
HOW'S YOUR STATE DOING? 2005 BRFSS PROVIDES INFLUENZA AND PNEUMOCOCCAL VACCINATION RATES FOR ADULTS AGE 65 AND OLDER


CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) web section recently posted immunization data on the influenza and pneumococcal vaccination rates for adults age 65 and older in 2005. The 2005 survey showed that nationwide, 65.7 percent of respondents reported having received influenza vaccination within the past year, and 65.9 percent reported ever having received pneumococcal vaccination.

To access influenza vaccination rates for all states, go to:
http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/brfss/list.asp?cat=IM&yr=2005&qkey=4407&state=US

To access pneumococcal vaccination rates for all states, go to:
http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/brfss/list.asp?cat=IM&yr=2005&qkey=4408&state=US
 
 
 
3.  October 2, 2006
CONGRATULATIONS! DR. NANCY COX, CDC INFLUENZA EXPERT, SELECTED AS FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR


On September 27, Dr. Nancy Cox, the chief of CDC's Influenza Division, was honored as Federal Employee of the Year. Dr. Cox was selected for the honor by the Partnership for Public Service for her work in helping the United States and the world prepare for a potential influenza pandemic. The partnership is a nongovernmental organization that works to make the government an employer of choice for talented, dedicated Americans.

On September 28, CDC issued a press release about Dr. Cox. A portion of it is reprinted below.

. . . . Dr. Cox received a bachelor's degree in bacteriology from Iowa State University in 1970. She was one of about 30 American students awarded a Marshall Scholarship to study in England at the University of Cambridge, where in 1975 she earned a doctoral degree in virology with a dissertation that focused on influenza virus/host interactions.

The recipient of numerous scientific and achievement awards, Dr. Cox is a member of the editorial board for the journal Lancet Infectious Diseases. She is also a founding member of the International Society for Influenza and other Respiratory Diseases and is the author and co-author of more than 175 research articles, reviews, and book chapters. For her leadership in preparing the United States and the international community for a potential influenza pandemic, Dr. Cox was also recognized in 2006 by Time and Newsweek magazines. Time magazine named her one of 2006's 100 Most Influential People of the Year, and Newsweek magazine honored her as one of the "15 People who Make America Great."

To access the complete press release, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/r060928.htm
 
 
 
4.  October 2, 2006
CARDIOLOGISTS STRONGLY ENCOURAGED TO VACCINATE THEIR PATIENTS WITH INACTIVATED INFLUENZA VACCINE


On September 19, the website of the American Heart Association (AHA) posted a press release titled "Annual flu shot may protect cardiovascular disease patents." The press release is based on an advisory for secondary prevention for patients with coronary and other atherosclerotic vascular disease. Developed by AHA in conjunction with the American College of Cardiology (ACC), the advisory recommends that patients with cardiovascular disease receive influenza vaccination.

Portions of the September 19 press release are reprinted below. A link to the abstract of an article (published in the journal Circulation, 5/16/06) outlining the advisory appears at the end of this IAC Express article.

The American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology are asking heart doctors to do something they may not normally do—give flu shots to their patients. However, patients with cardiovascular disease should not get the nasal-spray flu vaccine.

Patients with cardiovascular disease are more likely to die from influenza than patients with any other chronic condition, according to the new AHA/ACC scientific advisory.

Studies have found that annual flu vaccinations can prevent death in adults and children with chronic conditions of the cardiovascular system. But only one in three adults with cardiovascular disease was vaccinated against flu in 2005.

"If we vaccinated at least 60 percent of the 13.2 million people with coronary heart disease in the United States against influenza, we could prevent hundreds of deaths and thousands of cases of flu each year," said Matthew M. Davis, MD, lead author of the advisory and associate professor of pediatrics, internal medicine, and public policy at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. . . .

A visit to the cardiologist presents a good, but often missed, opportunity to get vaccinated, Davis said. "Most people with heart disease visit their cardiologists during the time when they should get the flu shot, but only about half of cardiologists in the United States stock the vaccine in their clinics."

. . . . [T]he most effective way to increase the number of cardiovascular patients vaccinated is to have flu vaccine available in all cardiology practices and to have physicians strongly recommend the vaccine to their patients. Most insurance plans cover flu vaccinations. . . .


To access the complete press release, go to:
http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=3042167

To access the abstract of the article on the of AHA/ACC advisory, go to:
http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/CIRCULATIONAHA.106.178242v1
 
 
 
5.  October 2, 2006
UPDATED FOR 2006-07: ONLINE INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE ON INFLUENZA VACCINE, ANTIVIRALS, LAB DIAGNOSIS, AND MORE


CDC recently updated six pages on its Influenza web section:
  • Questions & answers: Thimerosal-containing influenza vaccine (9/26/06)
  • Antiviral medications for influenza (9/26/06)
  • Lab diagnosis of influenza (9/26/06)
  • I practice healthy habits (poster; 9/22/06)
  • I had to take a flu break (poster; 9/22/06)
  • Interim guidance for influenza diagnostic testing during the 2006-07 influenza season (9/22/06)

To access these resources, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/whatsnew.htm#updated and click on the pertinent link.

To access a broad range of continually updated information on seasonal influenza, avian influenza, and pandemic influenza, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/flu

 
 
 
6.  October 2, 2006
ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON IMMUNIZATION PRACTICES (ACIP) MEETING SCHEDULED FOR OCTOBER 25-26 IN ATLANTA


[The following is cross posted from IAC's Hep Express electronic newsletter, September 28, 2006]

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) will hold its next meeting on October 25-26 at CDC's Clifton Road campus in Atlanta. The meeting is open to the general public.

To speed security clearance, ACIP attendees (participants and visitors) should register online. All non-U.S. citizens are required to register online AND complete the Access Request Form at least three weeks in advance of an ACIP meeting (i.e., by October 2 for the October 25-26 meeting). Non-U.S. citizens will not be allowed to register on site.

To register online, go to:
http://www2.cdc.gov/nip/ACIP/octoberRegistration.asp

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the draft meeting agenda, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/ACIP/agendas/agenda-oct06.pdf

For more information, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/ACIP/dates.htm or contact Dee Gardner by phone at (404) 639-8836 or by email at DGardner@cdc.gov
 
 
 
7.  October 2, 2006
PROCEEDINGS FROM JUNE 2006 ACIP MEETING NOW ONLINE


The CDC website recently posted the Record of the Proceedings of ACIP's June 29–30 meeting.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the proceedings, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/ACIP/minutes/acip-min-jun06.pdf
 
 
 
8.  October 2, 2006
AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION (APHA) ANNUAL MEETING PLANNED FOR BOSTON ON NOVEMBER 4-8


[The following is cross posted from IAC's Hep Express electronic newsletter, September 28, 2006]

Scheduled for November 4-8 at the new Boston Convention and Exhibition Center (near the waterfront), the APHA annual meeting offers attendees a platform to share successes and failures, discover exceptional best practices, and learn from expert colleagues and the latest research in the field.


For comprehensive information, go to: www.apha.org/meetings or call APHA's main phone number at (202) 777-2742.
 
 
 
9.  October 2, 2006
NEW: SEPTEMBER 28 ISSUE OF IAC'S HEP EXPRESS E-NEWSLETTER NOW ONLINE
 

The September 28 issue of Hep Express, an electronic newsletter published by IAC, is now available online. It is intended for health professionals, program planners, and advocates involved in prevention, screening, and treatment of viral hepatitis. The titles of two articles that will be of particular interest to IAC Express readers are (1) Check out IAC's hepatitis prevention program website for new and updated programmatic information and (2) New York state's 2006 program manual for perinatal hepatitis B prevention now available online.

IAC Express has already covered some of the information presented in the September 28 Hep Express; titles of articles we have not yet covered follow.

  • Read the Infectious Diseases in Corrections Report (formerly called HEPP Report)
  • Visit the Hepatitis B Foundation website for featured stories that include information on rising liver cancer rates
  • Check out the website of the National Nurses Advisory Council for Liver Wellness & Viral Hepatitis
  • New website supports people living with chronic hepatitis B with information about the disease, testing, and treatment
  • Get an international perspective on safe injection practices from SIGNpost newsletter and WHO web sections
  • Annual SIGN Injection Safety and Infection Control meeting to be held in Mexico City on October 23-25

To access the September 28 issue, go to:
http://www.hepprograms.org/hepexpress/issue48.asp

To sign up for a free subscription to Hep Express, go to:
http://www.hepprograms.org/hepexpress/signup.asp

To access previous issues of Hep Express, go to:
http://www.hepprograms.org/hepexpress

 
 
 
10.  October 2, 2006
CDC UPDATES ONLINE ADULT AND ADOLESCENT VACCINE QUIZ FOR PUBLIC


On September 14, CDC updated its online adult and adolescent vaccine quiz, "What vaccines do you need?" The quiz now reflects information about newly recommended vaccines (e.g., Tdap) and vaccines for which updated recommendations have been issued (e.g., influenza immunization of healthcare workers).

Designed to provide vaccine information for persons ages 11 years and older, the quiz asks the respondent to answer simple prompts about their demographics, lifestyle and work, and health status. A respondent who completes the quiz immediately receives an electronic chart that lists the vaccines specifically recommended for him or her at the time of taking the quiz.

Respondents are encouraged to print the chart and take it to their healthcare provider, along with a comprehensive chart (also printable) of information about all vaccines currently recommended for adults and adolescents.

To access the updated quiz, go to:
http://www2.cdc.gov/nip/adultimmsched
 
11.  October 2, 2006
NEW: IAC WEBSITE POSTS TURKISH-LANGUAGE TRANSLATIONS OF FIVE PATIENT-EDUCATION PIECES


The IAC website recently posted Turkish-language translations of current versions of five of its print materials for patients. We are grateful to Dr. Mustafa Kozanoglu and Dr. Murat Serbest for the translations.

To access ready-to-print (PDF) versions of the newly translated pieces, click on the links below:

(1) Are you 11-19 years old? Then you need to be vaccinated! (updated 2/06)

Turkish: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4020tu.pdf
English: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/11teens8.pdf

(2) Screening questionnaire for adult immunization (updated 9/06)

Turkish: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4065tu.pdf
English: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4065scr.pdf

(3) Screening questionnaire for child and teen immunization (updated 9/06)

Turkish: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4060tu.pdf
English: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4060scr.pdf

(4) Immunization for babies: A guide for parents (updated 5/06)

Turkish: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4010tu.pdf
English: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4010imm.pdf

(5) After the shots . . . what to do if your child has discomfort (updated 9/04)

Turkish: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/4015tu.pdf
English: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4015.pdf
 
12.  October 2, 2006
2006-07 SPANISH-LANGUAGE VIS FOR INACTIVATED INFLUENZA VACCINE NOW AVAILABLE IN AUDIO AND VIDEO FORMATS


The Spanish-language 2006-07 VIS for injectable trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV; dated 6/30/06) is now available on IAC's website in audio, multimedia, and web-page video formats. These formats are intended for use with low-literacy, Spanish-speaking patients. The web-page video is specifically tailored to be able to work for people who have slow Internet connections.

IAC is grateful to Healthy Roads Media for providing these alternative versions. Healthy Roads Media offers health information in a variety of formats and languages. For information, go to: http://www.healthyroadsmedia.org

To access any of the alternative versions of the Spanish-language VIS for TIV, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/#influenza In the Inactivated Influenza Vaccine section, either click on the link titled "Spanish (audio VIS*)" or on the link titled "Spanish (multimedia "movie" VIS*)." Either link will bring you to a menu on the Healthy Roads Media website where you can choose among audio, multimedia, or web-page formats.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) hard-copy version of the Spanish-language VIS for TIV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/spflu06.pdf

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in a total of 33 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis
Immunization Action Coalition  •  Saint Paul, MN
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.