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Issue 1061
IAC Express: Weekly immunization news and information
Issue 1061: June 18, 2013

TOP STORIES

IAC HANDOUTS

FEATURED RESOURCES

JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS


TOP STORIES

Reminder: May issues of Needle Tips and Vaccinate Adults available online
The May 2013 issues of Needle Tips and Vaccinate Adults are available online. Vaccinate Adults is an abbreviated version of Needle Tips with the pediatric content removed.

Click on the images below to download the entire May 2013 issues (PDF) of Needle Tips and/or Vaccinate Adults.

Download the May 2013 issue of Needle TipsDownload May 2013 issue of Vaccinate Adults!
Needle Tips: View the table of contents, magazine viewer, and back issues.

Vaccinate Adults: View the table of contents, magazine viewer, and back issues.

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CDC publishes recommendations for preventing measles, rubella, congenital rubella syndrome, and mumps
On June 14, CDC published Prevention of Measles, Rubella, Congenital Rubella Syndrome, and Mumps, 2013: Summary Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). A portion of the summary section is reprinted below.

This report is a compendium of all current recommendations for the prevention of measles, rubella, congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), and mumps. The report presents the recent revisions adopted by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) on October 24, 2012, and also summarizes all existing ACIP recommendations that have been published previously during 1998–2011 . . . . Currently, ACIP recommends 2 doses of MMR vaccine routinely for children with the first dose administered at age 12 through 15 months and the second dose administered at age 4 through 6 years before school entry. Two doses are recommended for adults at high risk for exposure and transmission (e.g., students attending colleges or other post-high school educational institutions, healthcare personnel, and international travelers) and 1 dose for other adults aged ≥18 years. For prevention of rubella, 1 dose of MMR vaccine is recommended for persons aged ≥12 months. At the October 24, 2012 meeting, ACIP adopted the following revisions, which are published here for the first time. These included:
  • For acceptable evidence of immunity, removing documentation of physician diagnosed disease as an acceptable criterion for evidence of immunity for measles and mumps, and including laboratory confirmation of disease as a criterion for acceptable evidence of immunity for measles, rubella, and mumps.
     
  • For persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, expanding recommendations for vaccination to all persons aged ≥12 months with HIV infection who do not have evidence of current severe immunosuppression; recommending revaccination of persons with perinatal HIV infection who were vaccinated before establishment of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) with 2 appropriately spaced doses of MMR vaccine once effective ART has been established; and changing the recommended timing of the 2 doses of MMR vaccine for HIV-infected persons to age 12 through 15 months and 4 through 6 years.
     
  • For measles postexposure prophylaxis, expanding recommendations for use of immune globulin administered intramuscularly (IGIM) to include infants aged birth to 6 months exposed to measles; increasing the recommended dose of IGIM for immunocompetent persons; and recommending use of immune globulin administered intravenously (IGIV) for severely immunocompromised persons and pregnant women without evidence of measles immunity who are exposed to measles.
As a compendium of all current recommendations for the prevention of measles, rubella, congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), and mumps, the information in this report is intended for use by clinicians as baseline guidance for scheduling of vaccinations for these conditions and considerations regarding vaccination of special populations. ACIP recommendations are reviewed periodically and are revised as indicated when new information becomes available.

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CDC publishes report summarizing U.S. influenza activity during the 2013–14 influenza season
 CDC published Influenza Activity—United States, 2012–13 Season and Composition of the 2013–14 Influenza Vaccine in the June 14 issue of MMWR (pages 473–479). A press summary of the article is reprinted below.

During 2012–13, influenza A(H3) viruses predominated in the United States overall during the influenza season, followed by influenza B viruses, while pH1N1 viruses were identified rarely. Compared with recent influenza seasons, this season began earlier, and also had a higher percentage of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness, higher rates of hospitalizations, and more deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza. The age group with the highest hospitalization rate were among people 65 years and older, accounting for more than half of all reported influenza-associated hospitalizations. The 2012–13 influenza season began early, and was relatively more severe than recent influenza seasons, particularly for people 65 years and older. This season is an example of the serious public health toll that influenza can take, and underscores the importance of influenza vaccination and treatment.

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FDA approves Fluzone (sanofi pasteur) as the third quadrivalent influenza vaccine licensed for U.S. use
On June 7, FDA approved a request by sanofi pasteur to supplement its biologics license application for Fluzone influenza virus vaccine to include a quadrivalent formulation for use in people age 6 months and older. Fluzone quadrivalent is the third quadrivalent influenza vaccine to receive FDA approval. FDA approved MedImmune's FluMist quadrivalent on February 29, 2012, and GlaxoSmithKline's Fluarix quadrivalent on December 14, 2012.

Related Links
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IAC Spotlight! Timeline of historic events related to vaccines and immunization
Looking for a timeline of events specific to the history of immunization? Look no further. IAC recently updated its Historic Dates and Events Related to Vaccines and Immunization web page. A brief description of the event and its date are displayed in a two-column chart. IAC offers it as a handy quick link at www.immunize.org/timeline

The listing of historic events is by no means exhaustive. If you know of an event that you would like included on the timeline, please email admin@immunize.org with the details.
 
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IAC HANDOUTS

IAC updates its standing orders templates for administering meningococcal vaccine
IAC recently updated its two standing orders templates for administering meningococcal vaccine. The two standing orders now include information that reflects the ACIP meningococcal recommendations published in March 2013. IAC also added an additional page to "Standing Orders for Administering Meningococcal Vaccine to Children & Teens"; it is now a two-page document.
Related Link
IAC's Handouts for Patients & Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public more than 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely.

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IAC revises its staff-education document “Healthcare Personnel Vaccination Recommendations”
IAC recently updated Healthcare Personnel Vaccination Recommendations to add information from ACIP’s February 2013 recommendation about giving Tdap to pregnant women during each pregnancy.

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FEATURED RESOURCES

Order IAC's popular full-size laminated versions of the 2013 U.S. immunization schedules today!
IAC's laminated versions of the 2013 U.S. child/teen and adult immunization schedules are covered with a tough, washable coating that lets them stand up to a year's worth of use in every area of your healthcare setting where immunizations are given. Each has six pages (i.e., three double-sided pages) and is folded to measure 8.5" by 11".

IAC's Laminated Child and Teen Immunization SchedulesIAC's Laminated Adult Immunization Schedules
Laminated schedules are printed in color for easy reading, come complete with essential tables and footnotes, and include contraindications and precautions—a feature that will help you make an on-the-spot determination about the safety of vaccinating patients of any age.

PRICING
1–4 copies: $7.50 each
5–19 copies: $5.50 each
20–99 copies: $4.50 each
100–499 copies: $4.00 each
500–999 copies: $3.50 each

For quotes on customizing or placing orders for 1,000 copies or more, call (651) 647-9009 or email admininfo@immunize.org

You can access specific information on both schedules, view images of both, order online, or download an order form at the Shop IAC: Laminated Schedules web page.

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JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS

CDC publishes report on Japan's 2013 nationwide rubella outbreak
CDC published Nationwide Rubella Epidemic—Japan, 2013 in the June 14 issue of MMWR (pages 457–462). The first paragraph of the article and the concluding paragraph of the Editorial Note are reprinted below.

Rubella usually is a mild, febrile rash illness in children and adults; however, infection early in pregnancy, particularly during the first 16 weeks, can result in miscarriage, stillbirth, or an infant born with birth defects (i.e., congenital rubella syndrome [CRS]). As of 2013, goals to eliminate rubella have been established in two World Health Organization regions (the Region of the Americas by 2010 and the European Region by 2015), and targets for accelerated rubella control and CRS prevention have been established by the Western Pacific Region (WPR). In 1976, Japan introduced single-antigen rubella vaccine in its national immunization program, targeting girls in junior high school. In 1989, a measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine was introduced, targeting children aged 12–72 months. However, adult males remain susceptible to rubella. From January 1 to May 1, 2013, a total of 5,442 rubella cases were reported through the rubella surveillance system in Japan, with the majority (77%) of cases occurring among adult males. Ten infants with CRS were reported during October 2012–May 1, 2013. Countries and regions establishing a goal of accelerated control or elimination of rubella should review their previous and current immunization policies and strategies to identify and vaccinate susceptible persons and to ensure high population immunity in all cohorts, both male and female. . . .

The effects of this outbreak have been wide-ranging, both within Japan and internationally. In the Region of the Americas, where endemic rubella virus transmission has been interrupted, importations have occurred in the United States and Canada in 2013. The international spread of rubella virus from Japan provides a reminder that countries in regions that have eliminated rubella need to maintain high levels of vaccination coverage and high-quality surveillance to limit the spread and detect imported rubella virus.


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CDC publishes report on polio outbreaks in Somalia and Kenya in May 2013
CDC published Notes from the Field: Outbreak of Poliomyelitis—Somalia and Kenya, May 2013 in the June 14 issue of MMWR (page 484). Portions of the article are reprinted below.

On May 9, 2013, the Somalia Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization (WHO) reported a confirmed wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) case in a girl aged 32 months from Mogadishu (Banadir Region), with onset of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) on April 18, 2013. Subsequently, eight additional WPV1 cases have been confirmed in Somalia, seven in Banadir Region and one in Bay Region. These are the first reported polio cases in Somalia since March 2007.

On May 16, 2013, the Kenya Ministry of Public Health and Sanitation and WHO reported a confirmed WPV1 case with onset on April 30, 2013, in a girl aged 4 months from the Dadaab refugee camps near the Somalia border. Four additional cases were confirmed in the camps. These are the first reported polio cases in Kenya since July 2011. All data are as of June 11, 2013. . . .

CDC recommends that all international travelers complete polio vaccination before travel. For travelers to countries with designated polio risk, including Ethiopia, Kenya, and Somalia, CDC recommends an additional polio vaccine booster dose.


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About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.
If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.
IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. U38IP000589 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: CSL Biotherapies; GlaxoSmithKline; MedImmune, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Novartis Vaccines; Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, Inc.; Pfizer, Inc.; and sanofi pasteur.
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Video: Vaccines for the Future
Vaccines for the Future: Dr. Rino Rappuoli, Head of R&D at Novartis Vaccines, gives his presentation titled "Vaccines for the Future: Designing the Next Generation of Vaccines for Global Public Health" at the World Vaccine Congress & Expo 2013.
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Issue Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
Publication Staff
Editor: Deborah L. Wexler, MD
Managing Editor: Dale Thompson, MA
Associate Editor: Teresa Anderson, DDS, MPH
Editorial Assistant: Janelle Tangonan Anderson
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This page was reviewed on June 18, 2013
 
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.