Home
|
About IAC
|
Contact
|
A-Z Index
|
Donate
|
Shop
|
SUBSCRIBE
Immunization Action Coalition
IAC Home
|
IAC Express
|
2013 Issues
|
Issue 1058
IAC Express: Weekly immunization news and information
Issue 1058: June 4, 2013

TOP STORIES

FEATURED RESOURCES

JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS

CONFERENCES AND MEETINGS



TOP STORIES

Reminder: May issues of Needle Tips and Vaccinate Adults available online
The May 2013 issues of Needle Tips and Vaccinate Adults are available online. Vaccinate Adults is an abbreviated version of Needle Tips with the pediatric content removed.

Click on the images below to download the entire May 2013 issues (PDF) of Needle Tips and/or Vaccinate Adults.

Download May issue of Needle TipsDownload May issue of Vaccinate Adults!

Needle Tips: View the table of contents, magazine viewer, and back issues.

Vaccinate Adults: View the table of contents, magazine viewer, and back issues.

Back to top


CDC publishes report on preventing unsafe injection practices in the U.S. healthcare system
CDC published Preventing Unsafe Injection Practices in the U.S. Health-Care System in the May 31 issue of MMWR (pages 423–425). The first paragraph of the article is reprinted below. [Note: Published occasionally in MMWR, CDC Grand Rounds reports are based on grand rounds presentations made at CDC on high-profile issues in public health science, practice, and policy.]

Injectable medicines commonly are used in health-care settings for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of various illnesses. Examples include chemotherapy, intravenous antibiotics, vaccinations, and medications used for sedation and anesthesia. Medical injections often are administered in conjunction with surgical procedures, endoscopy, imaging studies, pain control, and cosmetic or complementary and alternative medicine procedures. Safe manufacturing and pharmacy practices are essential because every injection must begin with sterile medication. The appropriate medication must then be safely prepared (typically drawn up in a syringe), then administered in a manner that maintains sterility and minimizes risk for infection. Safe administration depends on adherence to the practices outlined in CDC's evidence-based Standard Precautions guideline. Health-care providers should never (1) administer medications from the same syringe to more than one patient, (2) enter a vial with a used syringe or needle, or (3) administer medications from single-dose vials to multiple patients. They also should maintain aseptic technique at all times and properly dispose of used injection equipment.

Related Links
Back to top


ACOG publishes updated committee opinion regarding vaccinating pregnant women with Tdap vaccine
The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recently published Update on Immunization and Pregnancy: Tetanus, Diphtheria, and Pertussis Vaccination. Developed by ACOG’s Committee on Obstetric Practice, the updated opinion replaces an opinion on the same topic, which ACOG issued in 2012. The abstract of the June 2013 opinion is reprinted below.

In the face of dramatic and persistent increases in pertussis disease in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has updated its guidelines for the use of the tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) for pregnant women. The new guidance was issued based on an imperative to minimize the significant burden of pertussis disease in vulnerable newborns, the reassuring safety data on the use of Tdap in adults, and the evolving immunogenicity data that demonstrate considerable waning of immunity after immunization. The revised Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices guidelines recommend that health care personnel administer a dose of Tdap during each pregnancy, irrespective of the patient’s prior history of receiving Tdap. To maximize the maternal antibody response and passive antibody transfer and levels in the newborn, optimal timing for Tdap administration is between 27 weeks and 36 weeks of gestation, although Tdap may be given at any time during pregnancy. However, there may be compelling reasons to vaccinate earlier in pregnancy. There is no evidence of adverse fetal effects from vaccinating pregnant women with an inactivated virus or bacterial vaccines or toxoids, and a growing body of robust data demonstrates safety of such use. For women who previously have not received Tdap, if Tdap was not administered during pregnancy it should be administered immediately postpartum to the mother in order to reduce the risk of transmission to the newborn. Additionally, other family members and planned direct caregivers also should receive Tdap as previously recommended (sustained efforts at cocooning). Given the rapid evolution of data surrounding this topic, immunization guidelines are likely to change over time and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists will continue to issue updates accordingly.

Back to top


IAC Spotlight! Ten vaccine-related slide set presentations available from IAC, CDC, and other trusted sources
Looking for slides for an upcoming presentation on immunization? Look no further. The PowerPoint Presentations web section includes ten immunization-related slide sets from IAC, CDC, AAP, Autism Science Foundation, California Immunization Coalition, and WHO. Browse IAC’s collection of presentation slides for ideas and content for your next educational offering on improving immunization practices. They are posted in PDF format, and IAC's three slide sets are available in PowerPoint format by request.

IAC recently updated this slide set: A Photo Collection of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases.

To obtain any of IAC's three slide sets in PowerPoint format, simply request them from IAC by sending an email to admin@immunize.org.

IAC’s Presentations section on immunization and vaccine-preventable diseases is part of IAC’s online Directory of Immunization Resources.

Back to top


FEATURED RESOURCES

Order IAC's popular full-size laminated versions of the 2013 U.S. immunization schedules today!
IAC's laminated versions of the 2013 U.S. child/teen and adult immunization schedules are covered with a tough, washable coating that lets them stand up to a year's worth of use in every area of your healthcare setting where immunizations are given. Each has six pages (i.e., three double-sided pages) and is folded to measure 8.5" by 11".

IAC's Laminated Child and Teen Immunization SchedulesIAC's Laminated Adult Immunization Schedules
Laminated schedules are printed in color for easy reading, come complete with essential tables and footnotes, and include contraindications and precautions—a feature that will help you make an on-the-spot determination about the safety of vaccinating patients of any age.

PRICING
1–4 copies: $7.50 each
5–19 copies: $5.50 each
20–99 copies: $4.50 each
100–499 copies: $4.00 each
500–999 copies: $3.50 each

For quotes on customizing or placing orders for 1,000 copies or more, call (651) 647-9009 or email admininfo@immunize.org

You can access specific information on both schedules, view images of both, order online, or download an order form at the Shop IAC: Laminated Schedules web page.

Back to top


JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS

May issue of CDC's Immunization Works newsletter now available
CDC recently released the May issue of its monthly newsletter Immunization Works and posted it on the website of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD). The newsletter offers the immunization community information about current topics. The information is in the public domain and can be reproduced and circulated widely.

The May issue contains a great deal of useful, timely information. Be sure to read through all four sections: Top Stories, Influenza Information, Meetings and Conferences, and Resources and Information.

Related Link

Back to top


CDC's surveillance of U.S. health behavior includes information on influenza and pneumococcal vaccination
On May 31, CDC published a surveillance summary titled Surveillance for Certain Health Behaviors Among States and Selected Local Areas—United States, 2010. The paragraphs on influenza vaccination and pneumococcal vaccination from the article's Preventive Practices section are reprinted below.

Influenza Vaccination
In 2010, the estimated prevalence of receiving an influenza vaccination among adults aged ≥65 years during the preceding 12 months at the state level ranged from 26.9% in Puerto Rico to 73.4% in Colorado (median: 67.4%) (Table 16). Among selected metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas (MMSAs), the estimated prevalence ranged from 51.7% in Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida, to 77.1% in Barre, Vermont (median: 67.9%) (Table 17). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 49.3% in Miami-Dade County, Florida, to 87.8% in Douglas County, Colorado (median: 68.6%) (Table 18).

Pneumococcal Vaccination
In 2010, the estimated prevalence of ever having received a pneumonia injection or pneumococcal vaccine among adults aged ≥65 years ranged from 24.7% in Puerto Rico to 74.0% in Oregon (median: 68.6%) (Table 19). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 48.6% in Laredo, Texas, to 79.9% in Naples-Marco Island, Florida (median: 70.0%) (Table 20). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 47.6% in Hudson County, New Jersey, to 83.1% in Potter County, Texas (median: 70.6%) (Table 21).


Back to top


CONFERENCES AND MEETINGS

Presentations from 2013 National Adult and Influenza Immunization Summit now online; winners of Immunization Excellence Awards announced
The 2013 National Adult and Influenza Immunization Summit (NAIIS) was held in Atlanta on May 14–16. Slides of the presentations made at the summit are available.

In addition, the National Influenza Vaccine Summit's 2013  Immunization Excellence Awards were presented during NAIIS. These prestigious awards recognize individuals and organizations that have made extraordinary contributions toward improving adult and/or childhood influenza vaccination rates within their communities during the 2012–2013 influenza season. Descriptions of the winning projects are available for review. 

Back to top



About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.
If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.
IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. U38IP000589 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: CSL Biotherapies; GlaxoSmithKline; MedImmune, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Novartis Vaccines; Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, Inc.; Pfizer, Inc.; and sanofi pasteur.
IAC Express Disclaimer
ISSN: 1526-1786

Our mailing address is
Immunization Action Coalition
1573 Selby Ave, Ste 234
St. Paul, MN 55104

Copyright (C) 2013 Immunization Action Coalition
All rights reserved.

Subscribe Today: IAC Express, Needle Tips, and Vaccinate Adults: the up-to-date immunization information you need
IAC Express
IAC Express Home
2014 Issues
2013 Issues
2012 Issues
2011 Issues
2010 - 1997 Issues
Praise for IAC Express
Help
Disclaimer
Video of the Week
Video: JAMA Report on HPV Vaccine
JAMA Report on HPV Vaccine: The human papillomavirus or HPV vaccine was designed to help prevent cervical cancer. For the vaccine to be effective it must be administered before sexual activity begins. A new study examined whether girls ages 9 to 13 received the same protection from taking a 2 dose regimen versus young women age 16 to 26 who received the recommended 3 dose vaccine. Catherine Dolf has more in this JAMA Report.
Learn more
Visit the VOTW archive
Issue Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
Publication Staff
Editor: Deborah L. Wexler, MD
Managing Editor: Dale Thompson, MA
Associate Editor: Teresa Anderson, DDS, MPH
Editorial Assistant: Janelle Tangonan Anderson
Additional Information
News & Information
Media coverage about vaccines and vaccine-preventable diseases
Calendar of Events
Conferences and meetings on immunization
Shop IAC
Record cards, laminated schedules and more
 
This page was reviewed on June 4, 2013
 
Immunization Action Coalition  •  1573 Selby Ave  •  St. Paul, MN 55104
tel 651-647-9009  •  fax 651-647-9131
 
This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.