Immunization Action Coalition and the Hepatitis B Coalition

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Issue Number 618            August 28, 2006

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE

  1. New: CDC'S 2006-07 Flu Gallery materials are ready for downloading
  2. Updated: IAC makes significant revisions to the professional-education Q&A "Hepatitis B and the Healthcare Worker"
  3. CDC reports 13 cases of plague in the United States in 2006; presents case reports on six
  4. Updated: CDC adds information to its HPV web section for patients and professionals
  5. CDC reports on completion of first phase of laboratory containment of polioviruses in WHO's European Region

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ABBREVIATIONS: AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NIP, National Immunization Program; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
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August 28, 2006
NEW: CDC'S 2006-07 FLU GALLERY MATERIALS ARE READY FOR DOWNLOADING

On August 21, CDC posted an array of patient and provider education materials to its influenza web section.

The following are now available for downloading:

  • Patient education materials for the 2006-07 flu season
  • Provider education materials for the 2006-07 flu season
  • Patient screening form for trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV)
  • Stop the Spread of Germs posters and flyers in several languages
  • Fact sheets in several languages
  • Influenza vaccine VISs

To access the materials, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/patiented.htm
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August 28, 2006
UPDATED: IAC MAKES SIGNIFICANT REVISIONS TO THE PROFESSIONAL-EDUCATION Q&A "HEPATITIS B AND THE HEALTHCARE WORKER"

With the assistance and review of CDC, IAC recently revised and added to the three-page professional-education piece titled "Hepatitis B and the Healthcare Worker."

The document contains frequently asked questions with corresponding answers that are written briefly and can be quickly read. Many questions have been identified by our readers during their work in caring for patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection or in dealing with their own hepatitis B issues. The document discusses the uses and importance of hepatitis B vaccine and the methodology used to administer the vaccine. Questions and answers also address the efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety of the vaccine. Many answers concern what steps to take when official recommendations are not followed. The document also has a table detailing the recommendations for postexposure prophylaxis after percutaneous or mucosal exposure to HBV in an occupational setting. Finally, chronic HBV infection in healthcare workers is discussed.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the revised piece, go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/2109hcw.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/2109hcw.htm
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August 28, 2006
CDC REPORTS 13 CASES OF PLAGUE IN THE UNITED STATES IN 2006; PRESENTS CASE REPORTS ON SIX

On August 25, CDC published "Human Plague—Four States, 2006" in the MMWR Dispatch. The opening paragraph is reprinted below.

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Plague is a zoonotic disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. In 2006, a total of 13 human plague cases have been reported among residents of four states: New Mexico (seven cases), Colorado (three cases), California (two cases), and Texas (one case). This is the largest number of cases reported in a single year in the United States since 1994. Dates of illness onset ranged from February 16 to August 14; two (15%) cases were fatal. The median age of patients was 43 years (range: 13–79 years); eight (62%) patients were female. Five (38%) patients had primary septicemic plague, and the remaining eight (62%) had bubonic plague. Two (15%) patients developed secondary plague pneumonia, leading to administration of antibiotic prophylaxis to their healthcare providers. This report summarizes six of the 13 cases, highlighting the severity and diverse clinical presentations of plague and underscoring the need for prompt diagnosis and treatment when plague is suspected.

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To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the entire MMWR Dispatch, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/wk/mm55d825.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm55d825a1.htm
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August 28, 2006
UPDATED: CDC ADDS INFORMATION TO ITS HPV WEB SECTION FOR PATIENTS AND PROFESSIONALS

CDC recently added two resources to its human papillomavirus (HPV) web section:

ACIP Provisional Recommendations for the Use of Quadrivalent HPV Vaccine: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/recs/provisional_recs/hpv.pdf

The revised HPV Vaccine Q&A for the general public:
http://www.cdc.gov/std/hpv/STDFact-HPV-vaccine.htm

To access these and other related materials, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/std/hpv
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August 28, 2006
CDC REPORTS ON COMPLETION OF FIRST PHASE OF LABORATORY CONTAINMENT OF POLIOVIRUSES IN WHO'S EUROPEAN REGION

CDC published "National Laboratory Inventory for Global Poliovirus Containment—European Region, June 2006" in the August 25 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.

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Containment of facility-based polioviruses is an important component of the polio eradication initiative. Successful completion of Phase I in the WHO European Region [EUR] demonstrates the feasibility of containment. Inadvertent release of poliovirus from a facility into the population once the virus has been eradicated and immunization against polio stopped could have devastating implications. Therefore it is critical to carefully plan and implement laboratory containment measures. The 52nd World Health Assembly passed a resolution urging all member states to begin the process leading to the laboratory containment of wild poliovirus. The national containment process begins with a survey of all biomedical facilities, called "Phase I—laboratory survey and inventory." The purpose of the survey is to alert institutions and facilities to the upcoming need for containment, encourage reduction of unneeded wild poliovirus materials, and develop a national inventory of facilities holding such materials. WHO initiated the containment process in the European region in 1999, and provided significant technical direction and assistance to countries implementing Phase I containment processes. By March 2006, the 52 EUR Member States had surveyed 55,748 laboratories. Twenty-five countries, mostly in Western Europe, reported that no facility holds wild poliovirus infectious or potential infectious materials. In June 2006, the European Regional Commission for the Certification of Poliomyelitis Eradication accepted the EURO containment report and declared Phase I complete in the WHO European Region.

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To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5533a3.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5533.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

 

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This page was updated on August 28, 2006