Immunization Action Coalition and the Hepatitis B Coalition

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Issue Number 606            June 26, 2006

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE

  1. Breaking news: CDC urges awareness of measles in Americans returning from Germany
  2. Teleconference on shingles and new shingles vaccine is scheduled for July 18
  3. Free: Bulk copies of June 2006 Vaccinate Adults available while they last
  4. Reminder: Conference on Immunization Coalitions is planned for Denver on August 9–11
  5. MMWR announces that June 27 is National HIV Testing Day
  6. CDC issues update on progress toward polio eradication in Pakistan and Afghanistan in January 2005–May 2006

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ABBREVIATIONS: AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NIP, National Immunization Program; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
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June 26, 2006
BREAKING NEWS: CDC URGES AWARENESS OF MEASLES IN AMERICANS RETURNING FROM GERMANY

On June 23, CDC issued a Media Advisory alerting clinicians and the general public that some Americans traveling to and from the World Cup soccer championship may have been exposed to the measles virus. The Media Advisory is reprinted below in its entirety.

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For Immediate Release
June 23, 2006

MEDIA ADVISORY

CDC URGES AWARENESS OF MEASLES IN AMERICANS RETURNING FROM GERMANY

As American travelers go to and return from Germany for the World Cup soccer championship games, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises travelers and doctors to be aware that some travelers may have been exposed to the measles virus.

Since Jan. 1, nearly 1,200 cases of measles have been reported in the North Rhine-Westphalia region of Germany. Three of the 12 cities hosting the games—Cologne, Dortmund, and Gelsenkirchen—are in the affected region. CDC is particularly concerned about the risk posed by the World Cup because the event is expected to draw more than one million tourists, people will be in close proximity, and the measles virus is extremely contagious. Outbreaks like this can also cause greater concern because travelers may not take as many precautions when traveling to western Europe as they would to other parts of the world. There is a possibility that Americans traveling to Germany could be exposed to measles while there.

CDC recommends that

  • Travelers who plan to go to Germany should check their immunization status and visit their doctors if they are not immune to measles or are not sure they are.
     
  • People returning from the World Cup in Germany should see a healthcare provider if they develop signs or symptoms of measles—a fever and a raised rash that begins on the face and spreads to the arms and legs, cough, red eyes, or a runny nose.
     
  • People with these symptoms should also limit their contact with others as much as possible to prevent the spread of the disease.
     
  • Clinicians seeing a patient with fever should ask about vaccination history and any recent international travel.

Measles is a highly contagious viral respiratory illness transmitted through coughing and sneezing. The disease can lead to inflammation of the brain, resulting in death in approximately 2 of every 1,000 cases in developed countries, and can be an especially severe disease in people who are malnourished or with weak immune systems. In the United States, most people born before 1957—or those who have had a documented case of measles or received 2 doses of MMR vaccine—are considered immune.

Live virus measles vaccine given within 72 hours of exposure may prevent disease. Immune globulin given up to six days after exposure may prevent disease among people at high risk for complications of measles (such as pregnant women, people with weak immune systems, and children).

For more information about the measles outbreak and travel precautions, please visit www.cdc.gov/travel

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To access the media advisory, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/a060622-c.htm
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June 26, 2006
TELECONFERENCE ON SHINGLES AND NEW SHINGLES VACCINE IS SCHEDULED FOR JULY 18

The National Immunization Coalition TA [technical assistance] Network has scheduled a teleconference that will present an overview of shingles disease and the new Zostavax shingles vaccine. It will be held at 2:00PM, ET, July 18.

The presenter is Corklin Steinhart, MD, PhD, senior medical director, Policy, Public Health, and Medical Affairs, Vaccine Division, Merck & Co. A board certified internist and certified HIV specialist, Dr. Steinhart headed a medical practice caring for HIV-positive patients until joining Merck in April 2006.

To register for the teleconference, send an email to IZTA@aed.org Include this message: "Sign me up for the shingles call."

For additional information, or to access earlier programs, go to: http://www.izcoalitionsta.org/confcall.cfm
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June 26, 2006
FREE: BULK COPIES OF JUNE 2006 VACCINATE ADULTS AVAILABLE WHILE THEY LAST

IAC is giving away bulk copies (up to 100 per request) of the June 2006 issue of Vaccinate Adults.

If you have an immunization conference or an educational program coming up for adult medical specialists, this 12-page publication is an excellent item to distribute. Vaccinate Adults is written for health professionals. It is NOT for distribution to the public.

The June 2006 issue offers health professionals a newly revised version of IAC's popular Summary of Recommendations for Adult Immunization, updated with information about the new Tdap vaccine for adults. In addition, the issue includes an overview of the many standing orders IAC has developed for adult vaccination, as well as those for child and teen vaccination.

Because supplies are limited, it's best to make your request right away. The free copies go quickly. Sorry, we can mail orders only to addresses within the United States.

To request copies, fill out the online form on IAC's website: http://www.immunize.org/freeoffer

You will be asked to supply the following information:

  • The number of copies you want (maximum 100)
  • A description of how you plan to use the copies
  • Your name and complete contact information, including mailing address, telephone number, and email address

For further information, please email admin@immunize.org
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June 26, 2006
REMINDER: CONFERENCE ON IMMUNIZATION COALITIONS IS PLANNED FOR DENVER ON AUGUST 9–11

The seventh annual National Conference on Immunization Coalitions will be held in Denver on August 9–11. July 31 is the deadline for standard registration ($225). After July 31, registration will increase to $275.

Conference highlights include the following:

  • Training on creating, leading, and sustaining effective coalitions and community partnerships
  • Proven strategies for organizing at the grassroots level
  • Workshops on how to use data to drive coalition decision-making and activities
  • Models of successful health coalition activities and programs

To access comprehensive information about the conference, including the conference agenda and online registration, click here.

For more information, contact the conference coordinator: Carrie Shapleigh at cshapleigh@unbridledsolutions.com or (303) 996-6186.
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June 26, 2006
MMWR ANNOUNCES THAT JUNE 27 IS NATIONAL HIV TESTING DAY

CDC published "National HIV Testing Day—June 27, 2006" in the June 23 issue of MMWR. The article is reprinted below in its entirety, excluding references.

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June 27 is National HIV Testing Day. Initiated in 1995 by the National Association of People with AIDS, National HIV Testing Day serves to increase awareness of HIV/AIDS and to encourage all persons in the United States to get tested for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Locations of HIV test sites by postal code are available at National HIV Testing Resources at http://www.hivtest.org

Persons who know they have HIV infection often can receive antiretroviral treatment at an early stage of disease, when more treatment options are available. Knowing HIV status also has the potential to reduce transmission. Persons who learn they are infected with HIV usually take steps to reduce their risk for transmitting the virus.

In 2003, CDC began its Advancing HIV Prevention initiative, which aims to increase the prevalence of persons who know their HIV status by making HIV testing more available and by encouraging more people to take advantage of the tests. MMWR will publish CDC's revised Recommendations for HIV Testing of Adults, Adolescents, and Pregnant Women in Health-Care Settings later this year.

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To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5524a1.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5524.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html
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June 26, 2006
CDC ISSUES UPDATE ON PROGRESS TOWARD POLIO ERADICATION IN PAKISTAN AND AFGHANISTAN IN JANUARY 2005–MAY 2006

CDC published "Progress toward poliomyelitis eradication—Pakistan and Afghanistan, January 2005–May 2006" in the June 23 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.

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Progress toward polio eradication has been made in Pakistan and Afghanistan despite the ongoing war in some areas.

In 2005, Pakistan reported 28 confirmed cases of polio compared with 53 cases in 2004. In Afghanistan, the number of cases increased from four in 2004 to nine in 2005, all in three provinces in the southern part of the country. Areas in both countries, although mainly in southern Afghanistan, were affected by the ongoing war. Virus circulation has been restricted to an "axis" from central Pakistan through southern Afghanistan. Genetic analysis indicates that the virus is less able to circulate widely. In both countries, efforts have been intensified by implementing new health communication strategies and by using type 1 monovalent oral polio vaccine. The monovalent vaccine is expected to have a higher rate of positive response compared with the usual trivalent (types 1, 2, and 3) vaccine.

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To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5524a4.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5524.pdf

 

Immunization Action Coalition1573 Selby AvenueSt. Paul MN 55104
E-mail: admin@immunize.org Web: http://www.immunize.org/
Tel: (651) 647-9009Fax: (651) 647-9131

This page was updated on June 27, 2006