Immunization Action Coalition and the Hepatitis B Coalition

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Issue Number 600            May 22, 2006

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE

  1. Dr. Lee Jong-wook, WHO's director-general, dies suddenly
  2. New: MMWR publishes updated ACIP recommendations for hepatitis A vaccine
  3. CDC issues update about the current multistate mumps outbreak
  4. ACIP recommends deferring meningococcal conjugate vaccination for persons ages 11-12 years because of limited supply
  5. Important: May 24 is new deadline for your U.S. representative to sign immunization appropriations letter
  6. New: May 2006 issue of Needle Tips offers many resources for childhood, adolescent, and adult immunization
  7. Updated: IAC revises its Summary of Recommendations for Adult Immunization with new vaccination information
  8. Childhood immunization ranks second among the 25 most valuable and cost-effective preventive health services
  9. CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) will meet June 29-30; advance registration is recommended

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ABBREVIATIONS: AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NIP, National Immunization Program; VIS, Vaccine Information  Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
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May 22, 2006
DR. LEE JONG-WOOK, WHO'S DIRECTOR-GENERAL, DIES SUDDENLY

On May 22, WHO announced the death of its director-general, Dr. Lee Jong-wook. A notice from the WHO website's homepage is reprinted below in its entirety.

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Dr. Lee Jong-wook, Director-General of the World Health Organization, has died. He had been in hospital since Saturday afternoon [May 20], where he underwent surgery to remove a blood clot on his brain (a subdural hematoma). He remained in intensive care. At 0743 this morning, he was declared dead.

All of the staff of the World Health Organization extend their most sincere condolences to Dr. Lee's family. The sudden loss of our leader, colleague, and friend, is devastating.

Dr Lee led WHO to continue its mission to help people attain the highest possible level of health.

He was 61 years old. He is survived by his wife and son, two brothers and a sister, and their families.

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To access a tribute to Dr. Lee from the WHO website, go to:
http://www.who.int/dg/lee/tribute/en


To access additional information, go to: http://www.who.int/en
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May 22, 2006
NEW: MMWR PUBLISHES UPDATED ACIP RECOMMENDATIONS FOR HEPATITIS A VACCINE

On May 19, CDC published "Prevention of Hepatitis A Through Active or Passive Immunization: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)" in MMWR Recommendations and Reports. The summary is reprinted below in its entirety.

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Routine vaccination of children is an effective way to reduce hepatitis A incidence in the United States. Since licensure of hepatitis A vaccine during 1995–1996, the hepatitis A childhood immunization strategy has been implemented incrementally, starting with the recommendation of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) in 1996 to vaccinate children living in communities with the highest disease rates and continuing in 1999 with ACIP's recommendations for vaccination of children living in states, counties, and communities with consistently elevated hepatitis A rates. These updated recommendations represent the final step in the childhood hepatitis A immunization strategy, routine hepatitis A vaccination of children nationwide. Implementation of these recommendations will reinforce existing vaccination programs, extend the benefits associated with hepatitis A vaccination to the rest of the country, and create the foundation for eventual consideration of elimination of indigenous hepatitis A virus transmission.

This report updates ACIP's 1999 recommendations concerning the prevention of hepatitis A through immunization (CDC. Prevention of hepatitis A through active or passive immunization: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices [ACIP]. MMWR 1999:48[No. RR-12]:1–37) and includes (1) new data on the epidemiology of hepatitis A in the era of hepatitis A vaccination of children in selected U.S. areas, (2) results of analyses of the economics of nationwide routine vaccination of children, and (3) recommendations for the routine vaccination of children in the United States. Previous recommendations for vaccination of persons in groups at increased risk for hepatitis A or its adverse consequences and recommendations regarding the use of immune globulin for protection against hepatitis A are unchanged from the 1999 recommendations.

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To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR Recommendations and Reports, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/rr/rr5507.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5507a1.htm

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html
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May 22, 2006
CDC ISSUES UPDATE ABOUT THE CURRENT MULTISTATE MUMPS OUTBREAK

On May 18, CDC published "Update: Multistate outbreak of mumps—United States, January 1–May 2, 2006" as an MMWR Dispatch. Portions of the article are reprinted below. Please note: IAC encourages health professionals to read this worthwhile article in its entirety; links to it are given at the end of this IAC Express article. In addition, we are providing a link to CDC's special mumps web section, which is continually updated with information for health professionals and their patients.

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CDC and state and local health departments continue to investigate an outbreak of mumps that began in Iowa in December 2005 and involved at least 10 additional states as of May 2, 2006. This report summarizes preliminary data reported to CDC from these 11 states and provides recommendations to prevent and control mumps during an outbreak. . . .

During January 1–May 2, 11 states reported 2,597 cases of mumps. Eight states (Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, and Wisconsin) reported mumps outbreaks with ongoing local transmission or clusters of cases; three states (Colorado, Minnesota, and Mississippi) reported cases associated with travel from an outbreak state. The majority of mumps cases (1,487 [57%]) were reported from Iowa; states with the next highest case totals were Kansas (371), Illinois (224), Nebraska (201), and Wisconsin (176). Of the 2,597 cases reported overall, 1,275 (49%) were classified as confirmed, 915 (35%) as probable, and 287 (11%) as suspect; for 120 (5%) cases, classification was unknown. Twelve mumps viral isolates from six states were characterized; all were mumps genotype G.

For 2,067 (80%) of the 2,597 mumps cases with patient age available, the median age was 21 years (range: [younger than] 1 year to 96 years). In the eight states with outbreaks, the incidence rate was highest among persons aged 18–24 years (17.1 per 100,000 population), followed by persons aged 5–17 years (5.2) and 25–39 years (4.8). Among the 2,073 patients for whom sex was known, 1,244 (60%) were female. Among the 2,073 cases for which week of onset was known, 1,426 (69%) were reported in April. The peak week of onset has been April 2–8 (week 14) in Iowa and April 16–22 (week 16) in other states. However, additional cases with onset dates in April continue to be reported.

Parotitis was reported in 870 (66%) of the 1,327 patients for whom such data were available. Data regarding mumps complications and hospitalizations are incomplete. However, complications have included 27 reports of orchitis, 11 meningitis, four encephalitis, four deafness, and one each of oophoritis, mastitis, pancreatitis, and unspecified complications. A total of 25 hospitalizations were reported, but insufficient data were provided to determine whether mumps caused all the hospitalizations. No deaths have been reported. . . .

Editorial Note:
In the United States, the reported incidence of mumps declined after introduction of mumps vaccine in 1967 and the recommendation for its routine use in 1977. After expanded recommendations for a 2-dose MMR vaccine schedule for measles control in 1989, mumps cases declined further. During 2001–2003, fewer than 300 mumps cases were reported each year, a 99% decline from the 185,691 cases reported in 1968.

The current multistate mumps outbreak, with 2,597 cases reported through May 2, 2006, is the largest number of mumps cases reported to CDC in a single year since 1991, when 4,264 cases were reported. The first cases in the current outbreak were detected on a college campus in eastern Iowa in December 2005; the source of these initial cases is unknown. Although the age group most affected (38% of cases) has been young adults aged 18–24 years, many of whom are college students, the outbreak has spread to all age groups. . . .

To prevent mumps, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends a 2-dose MMR vaccination series for all children, with the first dose administered at ages 12–15 months and the second dose at ages 4–6 years. Two doses of MMR vaccine are recommended for school and college entry unless the student has other evidence of immunity. In a specially convened meeting on May 17, 2006, ACIP redefined evidence of immunity to mumps through vaccination as follows: 1 dose of a live mumps virus vaccine for preschool children and adults not at high risk; 2 doses for children in grades K–12 and adults at high risk (i.e., persons who work in healthcare facilities, international travelers, and students at post-high school educational institutions). Other criteria for evidence of immunity (i.e., birth before 1957, documentation of physician-diagnosed mumps, or laboratory evidence of immunity) are unchanged. Furthermore, healthcare facilities should consider recommending 1 dose of MMR vaccine to unvaccinated healthcare workers born before 1957 who do not have other evidence of mumps immunity.

During an outbreak and depending on the epidemiology of the outbreak (e.g., the age groups and/or institutions involved), a second dose of vaccine should be considered for adults and for children aged 1–4 years who have received 1 dose. The second dose should be administered as early as 28 days after the first dose, the minimum recommended interval between 2 MMR vaccine doses. In addition, during an outbreak, healthcare facilities should strongly consider recommending 2 doses of MMR vaccine to unvaccinated workers born before 1957 who do not have other evidence of mumps immunity. An MMWR Notice to Readers will be published, summarizing these interim recommendations in more detail.

Additional means to decrease transmission in outbreak settings include exclusion of persons without evidence of immunity to mumps from institutions such as schools and colleges that are affected by the outbreak. Once vaccinated, students and staff can be readmitted to school immediately, even if they have been exposed to a case of mumps. The period of exclusion for those who remain unvaccinated is 26 days after the onset of parotitis in the last person in the affected institution. Students who acquire mumps illness should be excluded from school until 9 days after the onset of parotitis. After an exposure to mumps, unvaccinated healthcare workers without evidence of immunity should be vaccinated and excluded from duty from the 12th day after the first exposure through the 26th day after the last exposure. Healthcare workers with mumps illness should be excluded from work until 9 days after the onset of parotitis.

In response to the current outbreak, the Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) issued vaccination recommendations in March targeting college campus and healthcare worker populations at high risk. On April 14, CDC issued a Health Advisory Notice summarizing vaccine policy recommendations for mumps prevention and control. In conjunction with local health departments, IDPH launched a statewide vaccination campaign during April 24–26, targeting persons aged 18–22 years in the 35 Iowa counties with the state's largest colleges and universities. In the second phase of the campaign, conducted May 2–4, vaccination was expanded to the remaining 64 counties, targeting persons aged 18–25 years. A third phase of the vaccination campaign was begun May 10 and targets persons aged 18–46 years. Vaccination activities also are being conducted or planned in Kansas, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. . . .

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To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this MMWR Dispatch issue, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/wk/mm55d518.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm55d518a1.htm

To access the CDC's special mumps web section, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/diseases/mumps/default.htm
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May 22, 2006
ACIP RECOMMENDS DEFERRING MENINGOCOCCAL CONJUGATE VACCINATION FOR PERSONS AGES 11–12 YEARS BECAUSE OF LIMITED SUPPLY

On May 19, CDC published "Notice to readers: Limited supply of meningococcal conjugate vaccine, recommendation to defer vaccination of persons aged 11–12 years" in the MMWR Dispatch. It is reprinted below in its entirety, excluding a reference.

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In January 2005, a tetravalent meningococcal polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine ([MCV4] Menactra, manufactured by sanofi pasteur, Inc., Swiftwater, Pennsylvania), was licensed for use among persons aged 11–55 years. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends routine vaccination with MCV4 of persons aged 11–12 years, of adolescents at high school entry (i.e., at approximately age 15 years) if not previously vaccinated with MCV4, and of college freshmen living in dormitories. Vaccination also is recommended for other persons at increased risk for meningococcal disease (i.e., military recruits, travelers to areas where meningococcal disease is hyperendemic or epidemic, microbiologists who are routinely exposed to isolates of Neisseria meningitidis, persons with anatomic or functional asplenia, and persons with terminal complement deficiency).

Sanofi pasteur anticipates that MCV4 demand will outpace supply at least through summer 2006. CDC, in consultation with ACIP, the American Academy of Pediatrics, American Academy of Family Physicians, American College Health Association, and Society for Adolescent Medicine, recommends that providers continue to vaccinate adolescents at high school entry who have not previously received MCV4 and college freshmen living in dormitories. Current supply projections from sanofi pasteur suggest that enough MCV4 will be available to meet vaccine demand for these groups. Until further notice, administration of MCV4 to persons aged 11–12 years should be deferred. If possible, providers should track persons aged 11–12 years for whom MCV4 has been deferred and recall them for vaccination when supply improves. Other persons at high risk for meningococcal disease (i.e., military recruits, travelers to areas where meningococcal disease is hyperendemic or epidemic, microbiologists who are routinely exposed to isolates of N. meningitidis, persons with anatomic or functional asplenia, and persons with terminal complement deficiency) also should be vaccinated.

For vaccination of most persons, MCV4 is preferable to tetravalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine ([MPSV4] Menomune-A,C,Y,W-135, manufactured by sanofi pasteur). MPSV4 is highly effective in preventing meningococcal disease caused by serogroups A, C, Y, and W-135 and is an acceptable alternative to MCV4, particularly in persons who have brief elevations in their risk for meningococcal disease (e.g., travelers to areas where meningococcal disease is hyperendemic or epidemic); however, availability of MPSV4 also is limited.

Periodic updates of vaccine supply will be available at http://www.cdc.gov/nip/news/shortages/default.htm Providers who have questions about their orders may contact sanofi pasteur at 800-VACCINE (i.e., 822-2463) or via its Internet site at http://www.vaccineshoppe.com

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To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version this MMWR Dispatch, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm55d520.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm55d520a1.htm
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May 22, 2006
IMPORTANT: MAY 24 IS NEW DEADLINE FOR YOUR U.S. REPRESENTATIVE TO SIGN IMMUNIZATION APPROPRIATIONS LETTER

In the May 15 Extra Edition, IAC Express asked readers to immediately call their member of the U.S. House of Representatives about signing onto a letter urging Chairman Regula and Ranking Member Obey of the Labor, Health & Human Services, and Education Appropriations Subcommittee to support increased funding for NIP--known as "section 317" of the Public Health Service Act. The deadline for House members to sign the letter was May 18. IT HAS BEEN EXTENDED TO MAY 24.

As of May 20, approximately 50 House members had responded to calls from their constituents and signed the letter. An even stronger show of support is needed. Backers of increased immunization funding are asking for many more signers. THE MORE REPRESENTATIVES THAT SIGN ONTO THE LETTER, THE BETTER CHANCE THE 317 PROGRAM WILL RECEIVE INCREASED FUNDING IN THE FY 2007 BUDGET.

As of May 20, the following representatives HAD ALREADY signed on. If your U.S. representative has not yet signed, please call them ASAP and encourage them to sign on by Wednesday, May 24.

Rep. Major Owens
Rep. Jane Harmon
Rep. John Salazar
Rep. Barney Frank
Rep. Michael McNulty
Rep. Gene Green
Rep. Rick Larsen
Rep. Frank Pallone
Rep. Henry Waxman
Rep. Sanford Bishop
Rep. Chris Van Hollen
Rep. Albert Wynn
Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger
Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee
Rep. Corrine Brown
Rep. Sherrod Brown
Rep. Chaka Fattah
Rep. Lois Capps
Rep. Jim McDermott
Rep. Peter DeFazio
Rep. Jim Marshall
Rep. Louise Slaughter
Rep. Dennis Moore
Rep. Carolyn McCarthy
Rep. Ron Kind
Rep. Robin Hayes
Rep. Tim Murphy
Rep. Jan Schakowsky
Rep. Bobby Rush
Rep. Michael Fitzpatrick
Rep. Elliot Engel
Rep. Earl Blumenauer
Rep. Melissa Bean
Rep. Ted Strickland
Rep. Raul Grijalva
Rep. Allyson Schwartz
Rep. Mike McIntyre
Rep. Tim Ryan
Rep. Norm Dicks
Rep. Heather Wilson
Rep. Michael Michaud
Rep. John Lewis
Rep. John Conyers
Rep. Phil Gingrey
Rep. Dan Boren
Rep. Mike Ferguson
Rep. Brad Miller
Rep. Ben Cardin
Rep. David Price

For a complete explanation of how to call your representative and of the importance of increasing immunization funding, read the May 15 IAC Express Extra Edition at
http://www.immunize.org/genr.d/issue599.htm#n1

To view the letter to Chairman Regula and Ranking Member Obey, scroll down to page 2 of the following link:
http://www.immunize.org/immunizationdearcolleague.pdf

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May 22, 2006
NEW: MAY 2006 ISSUE OF NEEDLE TIPS OFFERS MANY RESOURCES FOR CHILDHOOD, ADOLESCENT, AND ADULT IMMUNIZATION

IAC recently mailed the latest issue of Needle Tips (May 2006) to 130,000 health professionals and others who work in the field of immunization. Packed with immunization resources for health professionals, patients, and parents, the 24-page issue is well worth downloading. All articles and education pieces, except editorials, have been thoroughly reviewed by immunization and hepatitis experts at CDC.


HOW TO READ NEEDLE TIPS ON THE WEB
You can view selected articles from the table of contents below or download the entire issue from the Web.

To view the table of contents with links to individual articles, go to: http://www.immunize.org/nt

The PDF file of the entire issue, linked below, is 2.12 megabytes. For tips on downloading and printing PDF files, go to: http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/tips.htm

To download a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the entire May issue, go to: http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n34/n34.pdf

The articles in the May issue fall into four broad areas: (1) general immunization information, (2) viral hepatitis information, (3) childhood and adolescent immunization resources, and (4) adult immunization resources.


GENERAL IMMUNIZATION INFORMATION (five resources)
(1) In "Ask the experts," CDC experts answer questions about vaccines and their recommended use.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n34/expert34.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n34/expert34.htm

(2) "Top immunize.org resources--check them out!" gives readers a brief overview of users' favorite resources from the homepage of IAC's main website, http://www.immunize.org

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n34/topresources.pdf

(3) "Vaccine highlights" presents information on recently published ACIP recommendations, the 2006 childhood and adolescent immunization schedule, newly licensed vaccines, and new CDC immunization resources.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n34/vaccin34.pdf

(4) "Standing orders for administering vaccines to children and adults" gives health professionals general information about the many standing orders IAC has developed.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n34/standingorders.pdf

(5) Updated in October 2005, "Vaccines and related products distributed in the United States" presents the brand name, manufacturer, vaccine type (e.g., inactivated or live), and packaging options for all FDA-licensed vaccines and biologics.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/2019prod.pdf


VIRAL HEPATITIS INFORMATION (three resources)
(1) Updated in February, the patient-education pieces "If you have hepatitis C, which vaccinations do you need?" and "If you have HIV infection, which vaccinations do you need?" make it easy for patients infected with hepatitis C virus and/or HIV to learn about the vaccines they need.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n34/hiv-hepc.pdf

(2) "Medical errors put infants at risk for chronic hepatitis B virus infection--six case reports" recounts recent errors uncovered by routine monitoring of birthing hospitals in New York state.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2128.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2128.htm

(3) Updated in April, "Guidelines for standing orders in labor & delivery and nursery units to prevent hepatitis B virus transmission to newborns" includes pertinent information from the recently published ACIP recommendations for eliminating transmission of hepatitis B virus infection in infants, children, and adolescents.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) one-page version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n34/guidelines.pdf

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) two-page version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2130per.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2130.htm


CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENT IMMUNIZATION RESOURCES (three resources)
(1) Updated in April, the parent-education chart "When do children and teens need vaccinations?" has information on the new rotavirus vaccine and the expanded age range for influenza vaccine.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/when1.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n17/when1.htm

(2) "Are you 11–19 years old? Then you need to be vaccinated against these serious diseases!" was updated in February with information on the newly licensed Tdap vaccine.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/11teens8.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4020.htm

(3) Be sure to make a photocopy of the "Recommended childhood and adolescent immunization schedule, U.S., 2006" for every exam room at your healthcare site.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n34/recschild.pdf


ADULT IMMUNIZATION RESOURCES (two resources)
(1) Updated in February, "Vaccinations for adults: You're NEVER too old to get immunized!" now includes information on the newly licensed Tdap vaccine.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4030a.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n18/p4030new.htm

(2) Formatted for easy photocopying, the three-page "Recommended adult immunization schedule, United States, October 2005–September 2006" is a must-have reference for health professionals who see adult patients.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n34/recsadult.pdf
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May 22, 2006
UPDATED: IAC REVISES ITS SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ADULT IMMUNIZATION WITH NEW VACCINATION INFORMATION

IAC recently revised its Summary of Recommendations for Adult Immunization with current information about the target populations for hepatitis B vaccine and Tdap vaccine.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the revised adult summary, go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2011b.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2011b.htm
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May 22, 2006
CHILDHOOD IMMUNIZATION RANKS SECOND AMONG THE 25 MOST VALUABLE AND COST-EFFECTIVE PREVENTIVE HEALTH SERVICES

On May 16, the Partnership for Prevention issued a press release about a study that identifies childhood immunization against 12 diseases as the second most valuable and cost-effective preventive health service. The only preventive service that ranks higher is discussing daily aspirin use with adults at risk for cardiovascular disease.

The study identifies three additional immunization interventions as among the 25 most valuable preventive services. In rank order, they are annual influenza vaccination of people age 50 and older (#6), pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination of people age 65 and older (#7), and tetanus-diphtheria vaccination of all adults every 10 years (#25). The 12 vaccines recommended for children are those that protect against hepatitis B, diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, Hib, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, pneumococcal disease, and influenza

The article, titled "Priorities for America's health: Capitalizing on life-saving, cost-effective preventive services," is scheduled for publication in the July issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Portions of the press release follow.

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The study, sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), part of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), looked at all the preventive services currently offered by doctors and developed a ranking of 25 recommended services based on those that provide the greatest health benefits, both in terms of saving lives and improving quality of life, while offering the most value for the healthcare dollars.
. . . .

"Currently, about 95 percent of healthcare dollars in the United States are spent on treating diseases, with relatively little attention paid to preventing diseases, which should be a national priority," said David Satcher, MD, PhD, former U.S. Surgeon General and chair of the National Commission on Prevention Priorities (NCPP), a blue-ribbon panel that was convened by Partnership for Prevention to help guide the report. "This landmark study highlights the importance of shifting focus to preventive care, which can provide an enormous positive impact on health and well-being, while also more effectively allocating our precious healthcare dollars. Basically, these are the preventive health services that offer the biggest bang for the buck. . . ."

Partnership for Prevention worked in collaboration with HealthPartners Research Foundation, a Minneapolis-based clinical and health services research organization. The research team analyzed scientific evidence—including more than 8,000 published studies—and summarized the best available data on clinical preventive services to assist all types of decision makers in choosing where to focus their prevention efforts. . . .

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To read the full text of the studies, related commentary, and information about the 25 top preventive services, go to the Partnership for Prevention website at http://www.prevent.org/nccp
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May 22, 2006
CDC'S ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON IMMUNIZATION PRACTICES (ACIP) WILL MEET JUNE 29–30; ADVANCE REGISTRATION IS RECOMMENDED

The next meeting of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) will be held in Atlanta on Thursday and Friday, June 29–30.

To speed security clearance at CDC's Clifton Road campus, ACIP attendees (participants and visitors) should register online. To register for the June meeting, go to: http://www2.cdc.gov/nip/ACIP/JuneRegistration.asp

All non-U.S. citizens are required to register at least three weeks in advance of an ACIP meeting. Non-U.S. citizens will not be allowed to register on site. In addition to registering online, foreign attendees must also complete an additional document. To obtain this form, email Dee Gardner at dgardner@cdc.gov or call (404) 639-8836.

As a reminder, the fall ACIP meeting will be held Wednesday–Thursday, October 25–26. For more information, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/acip

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No part of this issue of IAC Express was produced using government funds. The views expressed here are those of the Immunization Action Coalition and do not represent the official views of any government agency, including agencies of the federal government.

 

Immunization Action Coalition1573 Selby AvenueSt. Paul MN 55104
E-mail: admin@immunize.org Web: http://www.immunize.org/
Tel: (651) 647-9009Fax: (651) 647-9131

This page was updated on May 30, 2006