Immunization Action Coalition and the Hepatitis B Coalition

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Issue Number 582            February 13, 2006

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE

  1. New: CDC publishes recommendations for influenza vaccination of healthcare personnel
  2. Don't miss it: Rosalynn Carter and Betty Bumpers to speak at NIC's closing plenary
  3. New: 9th edition of the Pink Book now available for downloading and ordering
  4. New: Spanish-language version of the current Recommended Adult Immunization Schedule now online
  5. Your help is needed: Support the National Hepatitis B Act, H.R. 4550
  6. February issue of CDC's Immunization Works newsletter focuses on Dr. Anne Schuchat, the new NIP director
  7. NIP makes Td and Tdap resources available online
  8. New: IAC and New York state collaborate on a professional-education piece about the hepatitis B birth dose
  9. Updated: IAC revises two patient-education pieces
  10. MMWR includes article about new lab test for diagnosing avian influenza in humans
  11. CDC adds to and updates its Influenza web section
  12. HHS and Institut Pasteur to collaborate on pandemic influenza preparedness
  13. February 2 issue of CDC's Pandemic Influenza Update now available on IAC's website
  14. CDC reports on U.S. influenza activity during January 22-28
  15. ICEID to be held in Atlanta on March 19-22; two related conferences also planned
  16. Minnesota Coalition for Adult Immunization Conference set for March 10

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ABBREVIATIONS: AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NIP, National Immunization Program; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
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February 13, 2006
NEW: CDC PUBLISHES RECOMMENDATIONS FOR INFLUENZA VACCINATION OF HEALTHCARE PERSONNEL

On February 9, CDC published "Influenza Vaccination of Health-Care Personnel: Recommendations of the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)" as an MMWR Early Release. Documents published in the MMWR Early Release format are available in electronic format only. Subsequently, they are included in a printed issue of MMWR.

Two sections of the recommendations are reprinted below--the Summary and the Summary Recommendations.

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SUMMARY
This report summarizes recommendations of the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) concerning influenza vaccination of healthcare personnel (HCP) in the United States. These recommendations apply to HCP in acute care hospitals, nursing homes, skilled nursing facilities, physician's offices, urgent care centers, and outpatient clinics, and to persons who provide home health care and emergency medical services. The recommendations are targeted at healthcare facility administrators, infection-control professionals, and occupational health professionals responsible for influenza vaccination programs and influenza infection-control programs in their institutions. HICPAC and ACIP recommend that all HCP be vaccinated annually against influenza. Facilities that employ HCP are strongly encouraged to provide vaccine to their staff by using evidence-based approaches that maximize vaccination rates.

SUMMARY RECOMMENDATIONS
The summary recommendations contained in this report are categorized by using the HICPAC evidence ranking system. The recommendations were drafted after review of peer-reviewed scientific articles, and whenever possible are based on well-designed studies; certain recommendations are based on strong theoretic rationale and expert opinion. All recommendations have been approved by HICPAC and ACIP. The committees involved in drafting and reviewing these recommendations included persons with expertise in infectious diseases, infection control, pediatrics, vaccinology, internal medicine, and public health. The recommendations are as follows:

  • Educate HCP regarding the benefits of influenza vaccination and the potential health consequences of influenza illness for themselves and their patients, the epidemiology and modes of transmission, diagnosis, treatment, and nonvaccine infection control strategies, in accordance with their level of responsibility in preventing healthcare-associated influenza.
     
  • Offer influenza vaccine annually to all eligible HCP to protect staff, patients, and family members and to decrease HCP absenteeism. Use of either available vaccine (inactivated and live, attenuated influenza vaccine [LAIV]) is recommended for eligible persons. During periods when inactivated vaccine is in short supply, use of LAIV is especially encouraged when feasible for eligible HCP.
     
  • Provide influenza vaccination to HCP at the work site and at no cost as one component of employee health programs. Use strategies that have been demonstrated to increase influenza vaccine acceptance, including vaccination clinics, mobile carts, vaccination access during all work shifts, and modeling and support by institutional leaders.
     
  • Obtain a signed declination from HCP who decline influenza vaccination for reasons other than medical contraindications.
     
  • Monitor HCP influenza vaccination coverage and declination at regular intervals during influenza season and provide feedback of ward-, unit-, and specialty-specific rates to staff and administration.
     
  • Use the level of HCP influenza vaccination coverage as one measure of a patient safety quality program.

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To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete recommendations, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr55e209a1.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of them, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/rr/rr55e209.pdf
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February 13, 2006
DON'T MISS IT: ROSALYNN CARTER AND BETTY BUMPERS TO SPEAK AT NIC'S CLOSING PLENARY

The closing plenary of this year's National Immunization Conference (NIC) will give conference attendees the opportunity to hear from two outstanding champions of pediatric immunization: Rosalynn Carter, former first lady of the United States, and Betty Bumpers, former first lady of Arkansas. Both are spokespersons for Every Child By Two, an organization that advocates for timely infant immunization.

Scheduled for March 9 at 11:30AM ET, the closing plenary session will focus on the two women's presentation, "Fifteen years of successful immunization partnerships--the successes and challenges that remain."

This year's conference is scheduled for March 6-9 in Atlanta. To access comprehensive online information, including the preliminary conference agenda, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/nic

To register online, go to:
http://conferences.taskforce.org/2006NIC/2006NIC.htm

For additional information, contact the conference planning team at (404) 639-8225 or nipnic@cdc.gov
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February 13, 2006
NEW: 9TH EDITION OF THE PINK BOOK NOW AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOADING AND ORDERING

[The following is cross posted, with thanks, from CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter (February 2006).]

The 9th Edition of NIP's textbook, "Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases" (the Pink Book) has been completed and is now available online at http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/pink/default.htm The Pink Book provides immunization providers with comprehensive information about routinely recommended vaccines, vaccine-preventable diseases, and much more. Updates and corrections to the book will be made in the online edition as they occur. PowerPoint slide sets for each chapter will also be available online. A hard copy of the Pink Book can be purchased for $29 from the Public Health Foundation. To obtain order information, please visit http://bookstore.phf.org/product_info.php?cPath=45&products_id=463
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February 13, 2006
NEW: SPANISH-LANGUAGE VERSION OF THE CURRENT RECOMMENDED ADULT IMMUNIZATION SCHEDULE NOW ONLINE

[The following is cross posted, with thanks, from CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter (February 2006).]

The October 2005-September 2006, [Recommended] Adult Immunization Schedule is now available in Spanish and can be printed from the CDC website. The [Recommended] Adult Immunization Schedule--which was released in English in October 2005--has been approved by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). To view, download, or print the schedule in English or Spanish, please visit http://www.cdc.gov/nip/recs/adult-schedule.htm#print
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February 13, 2006
YOUR HELP IS NEEDED: SUPPORT THE NATIONAL HEPATITIS B ACT, H.R. 4550

The Hepatitis B Foundation (HBF) has asked IAC to pass along the following message.

Please support H.R. 4550, the National Hepatitis B Act, which was introduced by U.S. Representatives Mike Honda (D-CA) and Charles Dent (R-PA) to Congress on December 15, 2005. Honda and Dent invite everyone who is concerned about hepatitis B to contact their U.S. representatives today.

You can read the text of the bill and contact your legislator today to support H.R. 4550. HBF has provided a sample letter you can send to your U.S. representative--simply copy and paste the text of the letter in an email, add your personal information, and send. Or print the letter and send it by postal mail.

H.R. 4550 specifically calls for the development of a national plan for hepatitis B, support for screening and immunization of high-risk populations in particular, and an increase in federal research to improve hepatitis B prevention and treatment options. Contact your representative and show your support today!

To read the bill, go to:
http://www.hepb.org/pdf/Hepatitis_B_Bill_HR_%204550.pdf

To read the sample letter, go to:
http://www.hepb.org/pdf/sample_letter.doc

For online information about contacting your representative, go to:
http://www.congress.org/congressorg/directory/congdir.tt?action=myreps_form
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February 13, 2006
FEBRUARY ISSUE OF CDC's IMMUNIZATION WORKS NEWSLETTER FOCUSES ON DR. ANNE SCHUCHAT, THE NEW NIP DIRECTOR

The lead article in the February issue of CDC's Immunization Works newsletter focuses on an interview with Anne Schuchat, MD, the new NIP director. Much of the rest of information in the February issue has already appeared in previous issues of IAC Express. Following is the text of the lead article and two articles we have not covered previously.

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MEET ANNE SCHUCHAT, NEW NIP DIRECTOR. Anne Schuchat, MD, pictured here in her office,
(http://www.cdc.gov/nip/news/newsltrs/imwrks/images/2006/Anne_Schuchat.jpg) is the new director of CDC's National Immunization Program (NIP). Dr. Schuchat began her career at CDC as an Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) officer in 1988 and most recently served as the acting director of the National Center for Infectious Diseases (NCID). In her work at NCID, Dr. Schuchat was involved in emergency response activities for the 2001 anthrax bioterrorism response and the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak, where she led the Beijing City epidemiology team for the World Health Organization (WHO) China office. She has also made important contributions to prevention of group B streptococcal disease and evaluation of foodborne listeriosis. Dr. Schuchat graduated with highest honors from Swarthmore College and with honors from Dartmouth Medical School. She served as resident and chief resident in internal medicine at NYU's Manhattan VA Hospital before beginning her public health career at CDC. Recently, Dr. Schuchat spoke with NIP's Stacey Hoffman.

YOU HAVE MANY SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN THE FIELD OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND INFECTIOUS DISEASE. WHAT ARE YOU MOST PROUD OF?
I was part of a CDC team that worked with many partner organizations to create a new standard of care for prevention of group B streptococcal infection in babies. It's one of those incredible stories in public health; there wasn't a new vaccine or new scientific breakthrough, but there was information, community concerns, and a willingness on the part of healthcare professional organizations, the legislatures, and the health departments to do something, without waiting for some new innovation. The new guidelines have accounted for more than 40,000 prevented infections in newborns, a greater than 80% drop in infection rate, and a 75% narrowing of the racial disparity between blacks and whites with that condition. I'm proud of the impact this has had for families, the use of science to bring policy and decision makers together, and the realization that I'm doing something that's good for people.

I UNDERSTAND YOU WORKED ON THE SARS RESPONSE. TELL ME ABOUT THAT EXPERIENCE.
Being part of the SARS response was an incredible honor and privilege. When I arrived in Beijing City in May 2003, the city had essentially shut down, and concern could not have been higher. Initially, there had been a delay in information acknowledgement. People had lost their jobs, and there was an acting mayor and a new health minister for the country. But Beijing had finally acknowledged the problem, and my role was to work with the public health leaders in the city to try to help control SARS. It was exciting and exhilarating to see public health interrupt the transmission, and control for something very serious that, as far as we know, didn't even exist before 2002. To stop human-to-human transmission, we used very traditional public health tools, including infection control, isolation, quarantine, and social distancing.

HOW WILL YOU APPLY YOUR EXPERIENCES WORKING WITH SARS TO YOUR NEW ROLE AS NIP'S DIRECTOR?
All of the things that were done with SARS--epidemiologic evaluation, surveillance, communication, partnership--are also needed in preventing vaccine-preventable diseases and in having strong immunization programs. The other thing that I enjoyed about working on SARS, and that I'm really looking forward to at NIP, is working with the whole network of people and expertise that's needed to keep infections at bay. You need to make new vaccines, keep production of old vaccines going, distribute vaccines to the places that need them, and finance vaccines so that people can actually get them. It's really the kind of thing that no one can do independently; you need lots of different people. I think that's what makes public health fun.

WHAT ARE YOUR SHORT-TERM PRIORITIES FOR NIP?
In the short-term, I'm really trying to learn the program, meet the people, and understand what we do. I'm also trying to understand our partners' needs, what's expected of us, and how I can lead the program. Also, a short-term priority is to help transition NIP into the new Center to be focused on immunizations and respiratory diseases. I can help smooth that transition, and get all of us excited about the things we can do now. I can also help reduce uncertainty and anxiety about what this means to people individually, or what this means to a program that they really care about. (Editor's Note: More information about CDC's reorganization can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5415a8.htm)

IMMUNIZATIONS ARE IN THE NEWS A LOT THESE DAYS. HOW DO YOU BALANCE ISSUES GETTING A LOT OF MEDIA ATTENTION, E.G., PANDEMIC PREPAREDNESS, WITH CORE IMMUNIZATION ISSUES, SUCH AS INCREASING ADULT INFLUENZA VACCINATION RATES?
Despite available vaccines, policies, and recommendations, and lots of educational activities, it's been hard to get adult immunization to be as strong as the childhood program. There are many reasons for that. On the other hand, pandemic influenza has concerned the public health community for years, but now it actually has the attention of the highest levels of government. But the pandemic concerns just highlight the critical role of our response to seasonal influenza, which is part of our adult immunization program. The more we handle seasonal influenza--having an ample vaccine supply, a strong vaccine delivery system, knowledgeable providers, informed consumers, a public that is ready to be vaccinated, and a system that can vaccinate very large numbers of people--then the better we'll do when the next pandemic occurs.

IMMUNIZATION WORKS IS A PUBLICATION FOR OUR PARTNERS. HOW DO SEE THE ROLE OF PARTNERS WITHIN THE REORGANIZED NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION PROGRAM?
The new Center will bring together immunizations from vaccine development through program implementation. Many of the partners that NIP has had are similar to the partners that NCID has had in terms of healthcare groups, state health departments, vaccine manufacturers, the research community, and the policy community. I hope that our new Center can be one-stop shopping for vaccine related issues; that partners will find us easy to work with, accessible, and responsive. We will need our partners more than ever, in the sense that we'll have the full range of immunization responsibilities. The new Center brings together vaccine delivery and adult immunization, the influenza branch, the surveillance research, and the laboratory activities involved with that. I hope that we can really strengthen our partnerships and raise the profile of these programs.

WHILE VACCINE SAFETY HAS BEEN TAKEN OUT OF NIP, ISSUES CONCERNING VACCINE SAFETY CONTINUE TO BE OF CRITICAL CONCERN TO OUR PARTNERS. WHAT WOULD YOU TELL PARTNERS THAT ARE CONCERNED ABOUT THE IMPACT OF THE REORGANIZED CDC ON VACCINE SAFETY ISSUES?
I'm committed to making sure that information is available to partners quickly, and that we learn what we need to learn about vaccines before and after they are licensed. I think that the changes in location of the immunization safety office have been made, and learning to work well with the new structure is an important priority for all of us. It's important for CDC to make this transition be successful, to fulfill the obligations that we have for an independent safety office, but strong communications internally and externally.

WHAT DO YOU SEE AS YOUR BIGGEST CHALLENGE AS NIP'S NEW DIRECTOR?
I actually think the biggest challenge is to deliver on the incredible opportunities we have. I know that we're already making a huge difference, but there's so much more we can do during the next few years with the recent licensure of new vaccines and several new vaccines on the horizon. There are also enormous opportunities for improving our adult and adolescent immunization programs, narrowing some of the gaps in the childhood immunization program, and assuring equity throughout the U.S. population. And there are opportunities on a global front, with polio eradication and measles mortality reduction. It's really tremendous to think about how much of a difference we could make.

WHAT DO YOU SEE AS THE MOST SIGNIFICANT CHALLENGES TO CONTINUING TO SUSTAIN HIGH IMMUNIZATION RATES, AND ADDRESSING CURRENT GAPS IN IMMUNIZATION COVERAGE?
I think that vaccine financing is an important area that underpins a lot of the barriers we have to ensuring vaccine gets to the persons who can benefit from it. I'd like to learn more about that as an issue and start working together on possible solutions.

I'M SURE YOU DON'T HAVE A LOT OF IT WITH YOUR NEW JOB, BUT HOW DO YOU LIKE TO SPEND WHAT LITTLE FREE TIME YOU HAVE?
Work is busy, but when I have it, I like to spend time with my husband. I also read quite a bit.

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OTHER IMMUNIZATION NEWS

2006 NATIONAL INFLUENZA VACCINE SUMMIT: The 2006 National Influenza Vaccine Summit was held January 24-25 in Atlanta, GA, with 112 organizations represented and 226 persons in attendance. The Summit is an informal partnership co-sponsored by the CDC and the American Medical Association (AMA). Through its co-chairs, executive committee, and standing work groups, it seeks to address year-round issues related to the production, regulation, distribution, and administration of influenza vaccine.

The focus of this year's Summit was on vaccine supply and distribution issues. The Summit opened with a welcome and overview provided by J. Edward Hill, MD, President of the AMA, and a keynote address by Julie Gerberding, MD, director of CDC. Next, Raymond Strikas, MD, of CDC's National Immunization Program (NIP), summarized data from surveys conducted by CDC, or in collaboration with partners.

The purpose of the surveys, conducted in mid-to-late November, 2005, was to learn about the experiences of various types of providers in acquiring/administering influenza vaccine and the general public in seeking influenza vaccination. Below are key points from the presentation:

  • At least 50% in all provider groups reported they received [more than] 40% of their orders except family physicians (43%).
     
  • More government providers--including state and local federal immunization grantees (86%), and county and city health departments (70%)--received [more than] 80% of their orders than providers in other groups [median 50%; range 24%-64%].
     
  • Those ordering from non-Chiron source were more likely to report [more than] 60% of their order received.
     
  • At least 50% in all provider groups reported that they referred priority-group patients to other locations for flu shots due to inadequate vaccine supplies, except pediatricians (39%) and occupational health groups (25%).
     
  • Of the public surveyed, 38% reported having received the vaccine, and 10% had not yet been vaccinated, but intended to seek vaccination. Four percent tried to, but vaccine was not available, and 48% said that they did not plan to be vaccinated. These estimates are similar to those in 2003, when over 83 million doses of vaccine were distributed.
     
  • Among those who received the flu shot, the locations where they were vaccinated included: doctor's office/HMO (39%); workplace (17%); other clinic/health center (10%); store, e.g., grocery/pharmacy (10%); health department (8%); hospital (6%); senior/recreation center (4%); other (4%); school (2%).

During the Summit, participants identified supply and distribution issues experienced during the 2005-2006 influenza vaccination season. The influenza vaccine manufacturers, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Healthcare Distribution Management Association (HDMA), and the Health Industry Distributors Association (HIDA) offered their perspectives followed by extensive open discussion. Initial projections for the 2006-07 season suggest as many as 120 million doses may be produced for the U.S. market, a substantial increase over the approximately 86 million doses produced in 2005.

Slides from the presentations, including Summit recommendations and proposed activities, are available at the AMA website at http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/13732.html

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ROBERT DAVIS TO DIRECT CDC'S IMMUNIZATION SAFETY OFFICE: Robert Davis, MD, MPH, was recently selected as the director of the CDC's Immunization Safety Office (ISO). Dr. Davis received his MD from the University of California at San Diego and his MPH from the University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine. He served as an Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) officer at the CDC from 1987-1989 and then as an epidemiologist for the Washington State Department of Health. He returns to CDC from the University of Washington where he was a professor in the Department of Pediatrics in the School of Medicine and a professor in the Department of Epidemiology in the School of Public Health. Dr. Davis has served as a leader in the field of immunization safety for many years. He is well positioned to lead the ISO as it evolves to take advantage of emerging capabilities in genomics and information technology, and to operate in a transparent, efficient, and accountable manner that ensures the public's trust.

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To access the complete February issue from the NIP website, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/news/newsltrs/imwrks/2006/200602.htm
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February 13, 2006
NIP MAKES Td AND Tdap RESOURCES AVAILABLE ONLINE

NIP recently alerted its partners to various resources concerning tetanus-diphtheria (Td) and tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccines, as follows:

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On June 30, 2005, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) voted to recommend the routine use of tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis vaccine, adsorbed (Tdap) in adolescents 1118 years of age in place of tetanus and diphtheria toxoids (Td) vaccine. On that date, ACIP also voted to approve the Vaccines for Children (VFC) resolution entitling eligible adolescents to receive this vaccine free of charge. For further information on ACIP recommendations for Tdap for adolescents, please see http://www.cdc.gov/nip/vaccine/tdap/tdap_child_recs.pdf

The VFC resolution may be found at
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/vfc/acip_resolutions/605dtap.pdf

On October 26, 2005, the ACIP voted to recommend the routine use of a single dose of Tdap in adults 19-64 years of age to replace Td when indicated. In addition, adults who have or who anticipate having close contact with an infant [younger than] 12 months of age (e.g., parents, child care providers, healthcare providers) should receive a single dose of Tdap. For further information on ACIP recommendations for Tdap for adults, please see http://www.cdc.gov/nip/vaccine/tdap/tdap_adult_recs.pdf

CDC currently has contracts for the Tdap vaccine with the two licensed manufacturers for purchase by grantees utilizing VFC Program funds, 317 Grant funds, and state/local funds.

The purpose of this notice is to re-emphasize that Tdap is recommended as a replacement to the previous recommendation for Td for adolescents with the following exceptions:

  1. Children 7-9 years of age who need catch-up vaccination for tetanus and diphtheria or for wound management (10-year-old children would also need Td if ADACEL is the only Tdap product available since this vaccine is not licensed for children [younger than] 11 years of age).
     
  2. Children 11-18 years of age receiving the primary series for tetanus and diphtheria need Td for 2 of the 3-dose series (they can receive one dose of Tdap).
     
  3. Children 7-18 years of age who have contraindications (or precautions) to the pertussis components in Tdap.
     
  4. Children 11-18 years of who have already received one dose of Tdap and need wound prophylaxis.
     
  5. Pregnant adolescents (ACIP currently prefers Td for pregnant adolescents who need tetanus vaccination).

Inventories of Td should not be used in lieu of Tdap for those adolescents and adults in whom Tdap is recommended. Inventories of Td will not count against orders for Tdap in grantees' allocations. Project officers will be contacting grantees in the near future regarding current Td inventories and grantees' plans for its use.

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February 13, 2006
NEW: IAC AND NEW YORK STATE COLLABORATE ON A PROFESSIONAL-EDUCATION PIECE ABOUT THE HEPATITIS B BIRTH DOSE

IAC recently collaborated with the New York State Department of Health to develop a professional-education piece, "Medical errors put infants at risk for chronic hepatitis B virus infection--six case reports." The one-page piece succinctly relates six instances in New York state in which infants born to mothers infected with hepatitis B virus did not receive proper perinatal prophylaxis because of medical errors.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of it, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2128.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2128.htm
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February 13, 2006
UPDATED: IAC REVISES TWO PATIENT-EDUCATION PIECES

IAC recently revised the following two patient-education piece:

1. "Screening Questionnaire for Adult Immunization" was revised to include a question related to tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap).

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of it, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4065scr.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4065scr.htm

2. "When Do Children and Teens Need Vaccinations?" is a piece for parents that was updated to reflect new recommendations and licensures.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of it, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/when1.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n17/when1.htm
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February 13, 2006
MMWR INCLUDES ARTICLE ABOUT NEW LAB TEST FOR DIAGNOSING AVIAN INFLUENZA IN HUMANS

CDC published "New Laboratory Assay for Diagnostic Testing of Avian Influenza A/H5 (Asian Lineage)" in the February 10 MMWR. Previously, the article was available only in electronic format as an MMWR Early Release.

To access a web-text (HTML) version of the MMWR article, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5505a3.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5505.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html
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February 13, 2006
CDC ADDS TO AND UPDATES ITS INFLUENZA WEB SECTION

CDC recently added one page to and updated three pages of its Influenza web section:

NEW
1. "Amendment of the February 4, 2004, order to embargo birds & bird products imported from Nigeria" (posted 2/9/06)

To access this resource, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/whatsnew.htm#new and click on the pertinent link.

UPDATED
2. "Embargo of birds from specified countries" (posted 2/9/06)
3. "Avian influenza: Current situation" (posted 2/8/06)
4. "Questions & answers: Vaccine supply and prioritization recommendations for the U.S. 2005-06 influenza season" (posted 2/3/06)

To access these materials, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/whatsnew.htm#updated and click on the pertinent link(s).

To access a broad range of continually updated information on seasonal influenza, avian influenza, and pandemic influenza, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/flu
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February 13, 2006
HHS AND INSTITUT PASTEUR TO COLLABORATE ON PANDEMIC INFLUENZA PREPAREDNESS

On February 6, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced that it and the Institut Pasteur have agreed to collaborate on activities intended to strengthen global pandemic influenza preparedness. The Institut Pasteur is a nonprofit foundation involved in preventing and treating infectious diseases through biological research, education, and public health activities.

Portions of the press release are reprinted below.

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For immediate release
February 6, 2006

HHS AND INSTITUT PASTEUR PARTNER ON PANDEMIC INFLUENZA PREPAREDNESS

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Institut Pasteur (IP) today agreed to carry out joint activities, beginning in Southeast Asia, to strengthen global capacity to detect influenza viruses that could have the potential to trigger a human pandemic.

The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), signed by HHS Deputy Secretary Alex M. Azar and IP President Professor Alice Dautry, establishes a Joint HHS-IP Working Group to oversee the development of collaborative projects, to include the following:

  • Building capacity in terms of surveillance, epidemiological investigation, testing, diagnosis, and control of infectious disease in countries affected by and at-risk for the spread of the H5N1 influenza strain;
  • Exchanging technical expertise to foster rapid response to disease threats; and
  • Disseminating effective and accurate public information on infectious disease, including in local languages in developing countries. . . .

For additional information about the U.S. government's efforts to contain avian influenza and prepare for a potential influenza pandemic, including the President's National Strategy and the HHS Pandemic Influenza Plan, please visit www.pandemicflu.gov For additional information about the IP, visit www.pasteur.fr

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To access the complete press release, go to:
http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2006pres/20060206.html
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February 13, 2006
FEBRUARY 2 ISSUE OF CDC'S PANDEMIC INFLUENZA UPDATE NOW AVAILABLE ON IAC'S WEBSITE

IAC recently updated its pandemic influenza web section with the February 2 issue of CDC's email newsletter Pandemic Influenza Update. To access it, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/pandemic/panflu020206.pdf

To access a range of pandemic influenza resources, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/pandemic
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February 13, 2006
CDC REPORTS ON U.S. INFLUENZA ACTIVITY DURING JANUARY 22-28

CDC published "Update: Influenza Activity--United States, January 22-28, 2006" in the February 10 MMWR. A portion of the article is reprinted below.

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During January 2228, 2006, the number of states reporting widespread influenza activity remained at five. Twenty-one states reported regional activity, 13 reported local activity, and 11 reported sporadic activity.

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To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5505a4.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5505.pdf
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February 13, 2006
ICEID TO BE HELD IN ATLANTA ON MARCH 19-22; TWO RELATED CONFERENCES ALSO PLANNED

The International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases (ICEID) is scheduled for March 19-22 in Atlanta. Two related conferences will be held in Atlanta in the days preceding and following ICEID. They are the International Conference on Women & Infectious Diseases (ICWID; to be held March 16-18) and the International Symposium on Emerging Zoonoses (ISEZ; to be held March 22-24). Information on the three conferences follows.

ICEID brings together public health professional to encourage the exchange of scientific and public health information on global emerging infectious disease issues. For a comprehensive overview of the conference, go to: http://www.iceid.org or contact iceid@asmusa.org or (202) 942-9330.

ICWID brings together clinicians, scientists, public health professionals, academicians, government representatives, and representatives from nonprofit, philanthropic, and international organizations to enhance prevention and control of infectious diseases among women worldwide. For comprehensive information on the conference, go to: http://www.womenshealthconf.org or contact Marian McDonald at mmcdonald@cdc.gov or Sakina Jaffer at (404) 371-5308 or sjm1@cdc.gov

ISEZ brings together public health and animal health professionals to strengthen the development of effective and co-operative partnerships to face microbial threats from emerging and re-emerging zoonotic diseases. For comprehensive conference information, go to: http://www.isezconference.org/home.htm or contact iceid@asmusa.org or (202) 942-9330.
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February 13, 2006
MINNESOTA COALITION FOR ADULT IMMUNIZATION CONFERENCE SET FOR MARCH 10

The Minnesota Coalition for Adult Immunization will hold its 15th annual conference on March 10 in Bloomington, MN. Titled "Issues and Strategies in Adult Vaccine Preventable Diseases," the conference is intended for healthcare providers committed to preventing influenza, pneumococcal disease, and other vaccine-preventable diseases.

For a copy of the conference brochure and to register online, go to: http://www.stratishealth.org/MCAI2006conference.htm

For additional information, contact Mari Drake, MCAI conference planner, at maridrake@comcast.net or (651) 428-6591.

 

Immunization Action Coalition1573 Selby AvenueSt. Paul MN 55104
E-mail: admin@immunize.org Web: http://www.immunize.org/
Tel: (651) 647-9009Fax: (651) 647-9131

This page was updated on February 13, 2006