Immunization Action Coalition and the Hepatitis B Coalition

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Issue Number 564            November 14, 2005

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE

  1. ACIP votes to recommend adult vaccination with tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis vaccine (Tdap)
  2. New: CDC issues final VISs for injectable and nasal-spray influenza vaccines and updates VIS instructions
  3. Update: CDC adds new fact sheet to its web section on Guillain-Barre Syndrome and Menactra meningococcal vaccine
  4. New: Prepublication copies of the ninth edition of the Pink Book now available for order
  5. CDC's satellite broadcast/webcast on Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases is set for December 8
  6. CDC updates its Influenza web section
  7. Multiple copies of the CD-ROM of NIP's Vaccine Storage & Handling Toolkit now available through IAC
  8. New: GAO releases its report on the influenza vaccine shortage of 2004-05
  9. New: November issue of CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter now available on the NIP website
  10. Updated: IAC revises two of its professional-education pieces
  11. Correction: Copyright information about ACOG's guidelines on immunization during pregnancy
  12. International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases planned for Atlanta on March 19-22, 2006
  13. Two new resources on global immunization now available

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ABBREVIATIONS: AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NIP, National Immunization Program; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
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November 14, 2005
ACIP VOTES TO RECOMMEND ADULT VACCINATION WITH TETANUS-DIPHTHERIA-PERTUSSIS VACCINE (Tdap)

On November 9, CDC issued a press release announcing that ACIP voted to recommend that adults receive the newly licensed tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis vaccine (Tdap). Portions of the press release are reprinted below.

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November 9, 2005

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON IMMUNIZATION PRACTICE RECOMMENDS ADULT VACCINATION WITH NEW TETANUS, DIPHTHERIA, AND PERTUSSIS VACCINE (Tdap)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) at its recent meeting (October 26 and 27) in Atlanta, voted to recommend that adults from 19 to 64 years of age be vaccinated with a newly licensed adult booster tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough) vaccine (Tdap).

Under the ACIP recommendation, the Tdap vaccine would replace the currently recommended tetanus-diphtheria vaccine that is used as the adult booster vaccine. The new vaccine helps protect adults from pertussis, an illness with severe and prolonged cough. It also reduces the risk of transmitting pertussis to infants.

The ACIP recommended that adults receive a booster dose of Tdap vaccine against tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis if they have not received a tetanus and diphtheria (Td) booster dose in ten or more years. Adults should receive a single dose of Tdap to replace a single dose of Td. Pertussis affects an estimated 600,000 adults every year, aged 20 to 64 years, and can result in weeks of coughing, cracked ribs from severe coughing spells, pneumonia, and other complications.

Tdap should also be given to adults who will have close contact with an infant less than 12 months of age, ideally at least one month before beginning close contact with infants. In situations when it is important to protect against pertussis, intervals shorter than 10 years since the last Td vaccination may be used. A 2-year interval between Td and Tdap is suggested to reduce the risk of reactions following vaccination.

"Infants less than 12 months of age have a high risk of pertussis-related complications, hospitalizations, and death. Vaccinating adult contacts may reduce the risk of transmitting pertussis to infants," said Dr. Steve Cochi, acting director of CDC's National Immunization Program. "Although pertussis is most serious in infants, it can also be serious in adults. Even adults who don't typically come in contact with young children should be vaccinated. . . ."

Most reported pertussis cases among adolescents and adults occur because of decline in protective immunity over time. Immunity against pertussis wanes five to ten years after the last childhood vaccination. . . .

For more information on pertussis, visit http://www.cdc.gov/nip/diseases/pertussis
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To access the complete press release, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/r051109.htm
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November 14, 2005
NEW: CDC ISSUES FINAL VISs FOR INJECTABLE AND NASAL-SPRAY INFLUENZA VACCINES AND UPDATES VIS INSTRUCTIONS

On November 5, CDC posted the final VISs for the trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV; injectable) and the live attenuated intranasal influenza vaccine (LAIV; nasal spray). The final influenza vaccine VISs are dated 10/20/05. They may be used immediately; however, stocks of the interim influenza VISs (dated 7/18/05) may be used through December 31, 2005.

Translation information. Only English-language versions of the final influenza VISs are currently available. The final versions will be translated into Spanish and other languages as soon as possible. For continually updated information about the status of VISs in development, go to NIP's web page Vaccine Information Statements News at http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/VIS/vis-news.htm

VIS instructions. CDC has updated the one-page Instructions for the Use of Vaccine Information Statements (dated 11/4/05). To access it, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/vis/vis-Instructions.pdf


ACCESSING FINAL INFLUENZA VISs FROM THE CDC WEBSITE
To obtain a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the VIS for TIV (injectable), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/VIS/vis-flu.pdf

To obtain a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the VIS for LAIV (nasal spray), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/VIS/vis-flulive.pdf


ACCESSING FINAL INFLUENZA VISs FROM THE IAC WEBSITE
To obtain a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the VIS for TIV (injectable), go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/2flu.pdf

To obtain a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the VIS for LAIV (nasal spray), go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/liveflu.pdf

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in a total of 33 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis
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November 14, 2005
UPDATE: CDC ADDS NEW FACT SHEET TO ITS WEB SECTION ON GUILLAIN-BARRE SYNDROME AND MENACTRA MENINGOCOCCAL VACCINE

On November 10, CDC added a fact sheet for health professionals to its web section Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) and Menactra Meningococcal Vaccine. Titled Guillain-Barre Syndrome Among Adolescents who Received Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine, the fact sheet has three sections: What you should know; additional facts; and for more information.

To access the fact sheet, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/vacsafe/concerns/gbs/gbs-menactra-facts.htm

To access the web section, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/vacsafe/concerns/gbs/menactra.htm
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November 14, 2005
NEW: PREPUBLICATION COPIES OF THE NINTH EDITION OF THE PINK BOOK NOW AVAILABLE FOR ORDER

The ninth edition of the Pink Book (officially titled Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases) will be available February 2006. The price is $25 for prepublication orders received by January 8, 2006. After January 8, the price increases to $29.

The Pink Book is developed and published by NIP/CDC and distributed by the Public Health Foundation. It provides physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and other public health and healthcare professionals with comprehensive vaccine information and recommendations, including the following:

  • General recommendations on immunizations including timing and spacing of vaccines
  • Screening for contraindications and precautions such as pregnancy and HIV infection
  • Specific strategies to achieve high vaccine coverage
  • Vaccine safety information


Information on the following is included in the ninth edition:

  • Pertussis (to reflect licensure of Tdap vaccine [tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis] and recommendations for its use)
  • Meningococcal (to reflect licensure of conjugate vaccine and recommendations for its use)
  • Hepatitis A (to reflect the universal recommendation for children 12-23 months and reduction of the minimum age from two years to 12 months).
  • Measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella (to reflect the licensure of MMRV vaccine [measles-mumps-rubella-varicella])


For additional information about the Pink Book and to order the ninth edition online, go to: http://bookstore.phf.org/prod463.htm You can also order by calling (877) 252-1200.
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November 14, 2005
CDC'S SATELLITE BROADCAST/WEBCAST ON SURVEILLANCE OF VACCINE-PREVENTABLE DISEASES IS SET FOR DECEMBER 8

The CDC course Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases will be broadcast and webcast on December 8 from 12 noon to 3:30PM ET. The course is intended only for public health professionals with responsibility for surveillance and case investigation of vaccine-preventable diseases. Individual registration will begin November 17.

Faculty includes William Atkinson, MD, MPH; John Moran, MD, MPH; Jane Seward, MBBS, MPH; and Sandra Roush, MPH. All are with NIP/CDC. A live Q&A session will allow participants nationwide to interact with course instructors by phone, fax, and email.

For comprehensive course information, go to: http://www.phppo.cdc.gov/PHTN/VPD-05 Questions about the course are being taken by email at nipinfo@cdc.gov

To register online, go to: http://www2a.cdc.gov/phtnonline Registration questions are being taken by phone at (800) 418-7246 and by email at ce@cdc.gov
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November 14, 2005
CDC UPDATES ITS INFLUENZA WEB SECTION

CDC recently updated three pages of its Influenza web section:

  1. "Questions & Answers: Vaccine Supply and Prioritization Recommendations for the U.S. 2005-06 Influenza Season" (11/10/05)
  2. "Recent Avian influenza outbreaks in Asia and Europe" (11/9/05 and 11/7/05)
  3. "FluSurge" (11/7/05)

To access these materials, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/whatsnew.htm#updated and click on the pertinent links.

To access a broad range of continually updated influenza information, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/flu
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November 14, 2005
MULTIPLE COPIES OF THE CD-ROM OF NIP'S VACCINE STORAGE & HANDLING TOOLKIT NOW AVAILABLE THROUGH IAC

IAC is now offering multiple copies of the CD-ROM of NIP's recently updated Vaccine Storage & Handling Toolkit. The toolkit features 11 chapters of information, numerous online resources, and two videos (on the CD): (1) How to Protect Your Vaccine Supply (Updated in June 2005) and (2) 10 Top Vaccine Storage and Handling Errors.

NOTE: One copy of the CD-ROM is available at no cost from CDC. To order, go to:
http://www2.cdc.gov/nchstp_od/PIWeb/niporderform.asp

Copies of the toolkit CD are priced at $15 through IAC. For ordering information, including placing online orders for up to 10 copies, go to:
https://www.immunize.org/vachandling/cdorder.htm

Special discount pricing is available for 11 or more copies. For information, call (651) 647-9009.

To view the toolkit on the NIP website, go to:
http://www2a.cdc.gov/nip/isd/shtoolkit/splash.html

PLEASE NOTE: NIP is no longer distributing the videotape How to Protect Your Vaccine Supply as a discrete product, separate from the toolkit--but IAC is. To order it separately, contact IAC at https://www.immunize.org/vachandling/tapeorder.htm (online order form), admin@immunize.org (email), (651) 647-9131 (fax), or (651) 647-9009 (phone).
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November 14, 2005
NEW: GAO RELEASES ITS REPORT ON THE INFLUENZA VACCINE SHORTAGE OF 2004-05

In September, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) issued its report on the influenza vaccine shortage of 2004-05. It is titled "Influenza Vaccine: Shortages in 2004-05 Season Underscore Need for Better Preparation." The report highlight is reprinted below in its entirety.

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WHAT GAO FOUND

Federal, state, and local health officials took several actions beginning in October 2004 to help ensure that individuals at high risk of severe complications from influenza had access to vaccine. Federal officials, for example, quickly revised vaccination recommendations to target available vaccine to high-risk individuals and to other priority groups. Additional actions were aimed to distribute vaccine expeditiously and to communicate with providers and the public as events unfolded and vaccine supplies changed. Beginning in mid-December, health officials took steps to distribute additional vaccine, broadening recommendations on who should be vaccinated.

Although these actions helped achieve vaccination rates approaching past levels for certain priority groups, such as those aged 65 years and older, several lessons emerged, including some that could help with future shortages. First, unless planning for problems is already in place, action is delayed. CDC's lack of a contingency plan contributed to delays and uncertainty about how to ensure that high-risk individuals had access to vaccine. Second, when actions occur late in the influenza season, they are likely to have little effect. Third, effective response requires communication that is both clear and consistent. CDC has taken a number of steps, including issuing interim guidelines in August 2005, to respond to possible future shortages. It is too early, however, to assess the effectiveness of these efforts in coordinating actions of federal, state, and local health agencies and others.

In commenting on a draft of this report, HHS [the Department of Health and Human Services] concurred with GAO's finding that contingency planning would improve response efforts, and the agency indicated that additional preparations were under way.

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To access the complete 43-page report, go to:
http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d05984.pdf
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November 14, 2005
NEW: NOVEMBER ISSUE OF CDC'S IMMUNIZATION WORKS ELECTRONIC NEWSLETTER NOW AVAILABLE ON THE NIP WEBSITE

The November issue of Immunization Works, a monthly email newsletter published by CDC, is available on NIP's website. The newsletter offers members of the immunization community non-proprietary information about current topics. CDC encourages its wide dissemination.

Some of the information in the November issue has already appeared in previous issues of IAC Express. Following is the text of one article we have not covered.

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OTHER IMMUNIZATION NEWS

INFLUENZA VACCINE SUPPLY UPDATE: Influenza vaccine manufacturers expect to produce more than 80 million doses of influenza vaccine this year, and as of the end of October, more than 57 million doses have been distributed. However, many providers still do not have any vaccine and others have only a portion of their order. Because a portion of the vaccine distribution has been delayed this year, healthcare professionals are encouraged to continue to vaccinate their patients into December as vaccine becomes available. Influenza peaks most often in January and February so the coming weeks on into December afford opportunities for vaccination. For the latest information about the influenza vaccine supply, as well as links to weekly surveillance reports, press releases, and educational materials, please visit CDC's influenza website at http://www.cdc.gov/flu

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To access the complete November issue from the NIP website, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/news/newsltrs/imwrks/2005/200511.htm
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November 14, 2005
UPDATED: IAC REVISES TWO OF ITS PROFESSIONAL-EDUCATION PIECES

In October, IAC revised two of its professional-education pieces: (1) Administering Vaccines: Dose, Route, Site, and Needle Size and (2) Vaccines and Related Products Distributed in the United States. Both pieces now reflect information about newly licensed vaccines.

(1) Administering Vaccines: Dose, Route, Site, and Needle Size now includes information about ProQuad, the newly licensed measles-mumps-rubella-varicella vaccine.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of it, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3085.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p3085.htm

(2) Vaccines and Related Products Distributed in the United States has been updated with current information on all vaccines and biologics distributed in the United States.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of it, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/2019prod.pdf

No web-text (HTML) version is available.
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November 14, 2005
CORRECTION: COPYRIGHT INFORMATION ABOUT ACOG'S GUIDELINES ON IMMUNIZATION DURING PREGNANCY

In the IAC Express of April 28, 2003, IAC erroneously stated that the document titled "Immunization During Pregnancy" is in the public domain. In fact, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) holds the copyright to the document. The document is ACOG Committee Opinion No. 282. It was published in the January 2003 issue of the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology (vol. 101:207-12), an ACOG publication. No part of the document may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior written permission from the publisher. IAC regrets the error and any inconvenience it may have caused ACOG or IAC Express readers.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the opinion from the ACOG website, go to:
http://www.acog.org/from_home/publications/misc/bco282.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version of it, go to:
http://www.acog.org/from_home/publications/misc/bco282.cfm

To access the ACOG home page, go to: http://www.acog.org
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November 14, 2005
INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES PLANNED FOR ATLANTA ON MARCH 19-22, 2006

CDC published "Notice to Readers: Fifth International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases" in the November 11 issue of MMWR. The notice is reprinted below in its entirety.

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CDC, the American Society for Microbiology, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, the Association of Public Health Laboratories, and the World Health Organization will cosponsor the Fifth International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases, March 19-22, 2006, at the Marriott Marquis Hotel in Atlanta, Georgia. The conference will explore current research, surveillance, and prevention and control programs addressing all aspects of emerging infectious diseases. Attendance is limited to 2,500 participants.

The conference will include general and plenary sessions, symposia, panels of speakers, oral and poster presentations, and exhibits. The deadline for submitting abstracts for presentations is December 2, 2005. Abstracts should address new, reemerging, or drug-resistant infectious diseases that affect human health. The deadline for late-breaker abstracts is February 1, 2006.

Information about abstract submission is available at http://www.iceid.org/abstractsubmission.htm Registration information is available at http://www.iceid.org and by email at meetinginfo@asmusa.org or thj0@cdc.gov

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To access a web-text (HTML) version of the notice, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5444a7.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5444.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html
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November 14, 2005
TWO NEW RESOURCES ON GLOBAL IMMUNIZATION NOW AVAILABLE

The IMMUNIZATIONbasics Project recently announced the launch of its new website (http://www.immunizationbasics.jsi.com). The website has information about the project, its priorities, activities, partners, and staff. It makes up-to-date information and resources on routine immunization and immunization financing available to users. The project is funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

To be added to the IMMUNIZATIONbasics mailing list, send an email to ImmBasics_Info@jsi.com and type "subscribe" in the subject line.

The September issue of Global HealthLink, the magazine of the Global Health Council, is dedicated to child health. It includes an immunization article, "Vaccinating the World's Children: A Public Health 'Best Buy'," written by Robert Steinglass, technical director of IMMUNIZATIONbasics.

To read the article online, go to:
http://www.globalhealth.org/reports/report.php3?id=210

To visit the homepage of the Global Health Council's website, go to:
http://www.globalhealth.org

 

Immunization Action Coalition1573 Selby AvenueSt. Paul MN 55104
E-mail: admin@immunize.org Web: http://www.immunize.org/
Tel: (651) 647-9009Fax: (651) 647-9131

This page was updated on November 14, 2005