Immunization Action Coalition and the Hepatitis B Coalition

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Issue Number 560            October 24, 2005

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE

  1. Read immediately: CDC issues guidance about vaccine storage during power outages
  2. FDA approves Havrix hepatitis A vaccine for use in children as young as age 12 months
  3. New: LTC facilities funded by Medicare or Medicaid now must offer residents influenza and pneumococcal vaccination
  4. New: Here are three excellent influenza resources you should know about
  5. New: CDC's Influenza web section posts comprehensive information about avian influenza
  6. CDC declares 1918 pandemic influenza virus a select agent
  7. 2003 influenza vaccination rates for elderly and high-risk persons fell short of national objectives
  8. Survey indicates only 13 percent of pregnant women received influenza vaccination during the 2003-04 influenza season
  9. October issue of CDC's Immunization Works electronic newsletter now available on the NIP website
  10. Interim VIS for injectable influenza vaccine now in Vietnamese and Armenian; audio and video VISs available
  11. MMWR includes CDC's report on recent polio infections among four Minnesota children
  12. New: APHA annual meeting moved from New Orleans to Philadelphia; date changed to December 10-14

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ABBREVIATIONS: AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NIP, National Immunization Program; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
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October 24, 2005
READ IMMEDIATELY: CDC ISSUES GUIDANCE ABOUT VACCINE STORAGE DURING POWER OUTAGES

On October 21, CDC published a Read Immediately issue of Immunization Works, its email immunization newsletter. Titled "Impact of Power Outage on Vaccine Storage," the Read Immediately issue offers guidance on vaccine storage during power outages. It is reprinted below in its entirety.

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IMPACT OF POWER OUTAGE ON VACCINE STORAGE

With the approach of a hurricane, an interruption of power supply is always an issue of concern. While outages may be brief, they can persist for extended periods of time. As many of you are aware, power outages have significant implications for vaccine storage. The following should provide some guidance regarding vaccine storage issues.

Do not open freezers and refrigerators until power is restored.

Most refrigerated vaccines are relatively stable at room temperature for limited periods of time. The vaccines of most concern are MMR and Varivax, which are sensitive to elevated temperatures. MMR may retain potency at room temperature, depending on the duration of exposure. With regard to Varivax, CDC will be consulting with Merck Vaccines to determine the best course of action.

MONITOR TEMPERATURES; DON'T DISCARD [VACCINES]; DON'T ADMINISTER AFFECTED VACCINES UNTIL YOU HAVE DISCUSSED WITH PUBLIC HEALTH AUTHORITIES.

If the power outage is on-going, [do the following]:

  1. Keep all refrigerators and freezers closed. This will help to conserve the cold mass of the vaccines.
     
  2. Continue to monitor temperatures if possible. Do not open units to check temperatures during the power outage. Instead, record the temperature as soon as possible after the power is restored, and the duration of the outage. This will provide data on the maximum temperature and maximum duration of exposures to elevated temperatures.
     
  3. If alternative storage with reliable power sources is available (i.e., hospital with generator power), transfer to that facility can be considered. If transporting vaccine, measure the temperature of the refrigerator(s) and freezer(s) when the vaccines are removed. If possible transport the vaccine following proper cold-chain procedures for storage and handling or try to record the temperature the vaccine is exposed to during transport.

When power has been restored, [do the following]:

  1. Record the temperature in the unit as soon as possible after power has been restored. Continue to monitor the temperatures until they reach the normal 28 degrees Celsius (C) range in the refrigerator, or -15 degrees C or less in the freezer. Be sure to record the duration of increased temperature exposure and the maximum temperature observed.
     
  2. If you receive vaccine from your state or local health department, they may be contacting you with guidance on collecting information on vaccine exposed to extreme temperatures.
     
  3. If you are concerned about the exposure or efficacy of any of your vaccine stock, do not administer the vaccine until you have consulted your state or local health department.
     
  4. Keep exposed vaccine separated from any new product you receive and continue to store at the proper temperature if possible.
     
  5. Do not discard any exposed vaccine. Any vaccine determined not to be viable may be returned to your vaccine supplier. Your state or local health department will work with you on all vaccine they supply to you.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE PLEASE CONTACT YOUR STATE OR LOCAL HEALTH DEPARTMENT.

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To access this Read Immediately issue, go to the Immunization Works index page at http://www.cdc.gov/nip/news/newsltrs/imwrks/imwrks.htm Scroll down to the section titled "Special 2005 'read immediately' issues," and click on the link for the October 21 issue.
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October 24, 2005
FDA APPROVES HAVRIX HEPATITIS A VACCINE FOR USE IN CHILDREN AS YOUNG AS AGE 12 MONTHS

On October 17, FDA approved the use of GlaxoSmithKline's Havrix hepatitis A vaccine for persons ages 12 months and older. In the original licensure, the age indication was for persons ages two years and older.

To view the supplemental license approval information on the FDA website, go to:
http://www.fda.gov/cber/products/havgsk101705.htm

To read the prescribing information, go to:
http://www.fda.gov/cber/label/havgsk101705LB.pdf
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October 24, 2005
NEW: LTC FACILITIES FUNDED BY MEDICARE OR MEDICAID NOW MUST OFFER RESIDENTS INFLUENZA AND PNEUMOCOCCAL VACCINATION

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently issued a final rule requiring long-term care (LTC) facilities to offer residents annual influenza vaccination and lifetime pneumococcal vaccination as a condition of participation in the Medicare program. Measurement of vaccination levels will occur by state survey and certification staff; it will be available on a quarterly basis starting in 2006.

The rule, which went into effect October 7, was published in the Federal Register; the summary is reprinted below in its entirety.

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MEDICARE AND MEDICAID PROGRAMS; CONDITION OF PARTICIPATION: IMMUNIZATION STANDARD FOR LONG-TERM CARE FACILITIES

SUMMARY: The goal of this final rule is to increase immunization rates in Medicare and Medicaid participating long-term care (LTC) facilities by requiring LTC facilities to offer each resident immunization against influenza annually, as well as lifetime immunization against pneumococcal disease. LTC facilities will be required to ensure that before offering the immunization, each resident or the resident's legal representative receives education regarding the benefits and potential side effects of immunization. The facilities will be required to offer immunization against influenza annually and immunization against pneumococcal disease once, unless medically contraindicated or the resident or the resident's legal representative refuses immunization. Increasing the use of Medicare-funded preventive services is a goal of both CMS and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This final rule is intended to increase the number of elderly receiving influenza and pneumococcal immunization and decrease the morbidity and mortality rate from influenza and pneumococcal diseases.

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To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the entire final rule as published in the Federal Register, go to: http://www.cms.hhs.gov/providerupdate/regs/cms3198F.pdf
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October 24, 2005
NEW: HERE ARE THREE EXCELLENT INFLUENZA RESOURCES YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT

IAC has recently become aware of three excellent influenza resources for health professionals, parents, and patients: (1) the website of Families Fighting Flu, Inc.; (2) Key Facts about Influenza (Flu) Vaccine, a new CDC fact sheet for parents and patients; and (3) Influenza: What You Should Know (volume 2), a patient-education tear pad published by the Vaccine Education Center of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Details follow:

(1) FAMILIES FIGHTING FLU, INC.
Launched on October 12, Families Fighting Flu, Inc., is an alliance of U.S. families and pediatricians whose aim is to reduce pediatric influenza deaths by promoting annual influenza immunization for children. Family members involved in the alliance have either lost a child to the disease or have a child who experienced severe medical complications from the disease. The alliance encourages such families to unite for support and prevention. The alliance also works with pediatricians to help parents recognize the warning signs of influenza and to prevent its spread.

As part of this effort, Families Fighting Flu has started a website that explains the alliance and introduces users to families that have been affected by influenza. The website also offers information about the disease and vaccine and provides links to influenza-related organizations. To visit the website, go to: http://www.familiesfightingflu.org

To access a press release announcing the formation of the alliance, go to:
http://www.familiesfightingflu.org/resources/pressrelease.aspx


(2) FACT SHEET: KEY FACTS ABOUT INFLUENZA (FLU) VACCINE
CDC's Influenza web section (http://www.cdc.gov/flu) recently added a banner, "Protect yourself. Protect your loved ones. Get your flu vaccine." The banner has a link to an updated patient-education fact sheet "Key Facts about Influenza (Flu) Vaccine," which is currently available in English, Chinese, and Vietnamese.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the English-language fact sheet, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/pdf/vaccinekeyfacts.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version of it, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/keyfacts.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the Chinese-language version, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/chi/pdf/vaccinekeyfacts_ch.pdf

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the Vietnamese-language version, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/vie/pdf/vaccinekeyfacts_vi.pdf


(3) INFLUENZA: WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW
Updated for 2005, the tear pad "Influenza: What You Should Know" answers 10 frequently asked questions about influenza and the influenza vaccine. Both English- and Spanish-language tear pads are available; each has 50 sheets. Each site of a medical practice can order two pads in each language at no cost. Larger quantities are available for a nominal shipping cost. Tear pad sheets can also be downloaded.

To view or download a ready-to-print (PDF) version of an English-language tear pad sheet, click here.

To view or download a ready-to-print (PDF) version of a Spanish-language tear pad sheet, click here.

To place an order for two free tear pads in English and/or Spanish, contact VEC by email at vaccines@email.chop.edu, by phone at (215) 590-9990, by fax at (215) 590-2025. To place an online order, go to: https://www.chop.edu/vaccine/vec/vecprof_order.cfm
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October 24, 2005
NEW: CDC'S INFLUENZA WEB SECTION POSTS COMPREHENSIVE INFORMATION ABOUT AVIAN INFLUENZA

CDC's Influenza web section recently posted a page, "Avian Influenza (Bird Flu)," that has links to comprehensive information about avian influenza. Included is general information about the disease, as well as outbreak information, professional guidance, and travel advice.

Information is continually updated. To access the avian influenza page, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/avian
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October 24, 2005
CDC DECLARES 1918 PANDEMIC INFLUENZA VIRUS A SELECT AGENT

On October 20, CDC announced in a press release that an interim rule published in the Federal Register classifies the virus strain responsible for the 1918 influenza pandemic as a select agent. Portions of the press release are reprinted below.

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For Immediate Release
October 20, 2005

1918 PANDEMIC INFLUENZA VIRUS DECLARED A SELECT AGENT

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published today in the Federal Register an interim rule declaring the strain of influenza responsible for the 1918 pandemic asa select agent. There are currently 41 other agents and toxins listed as select agents under the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002.

This action follows recent work done by CDC scientists to successfully reconstruct the 1918 virus in hopes of better understanding it. The virus was reconstructed to aid public health officials in preparing for the possibility of another pandemic of influenza. It will also be helpful to biomedical scientists as they seek to understand what made the virus so harmful and to develop better antiviral drugs and influenza vaccines.

"We've learned why this virus was so deadly and we know it's easily transmitted from person to person," said CDC Director Dr. Julie Gerberding. "But there is a lot we don't know so it's only logical that we take immediate steps to regulate this virus as a select agent as an added way to protect the public."

Under provisions outlined in the interim rule, all entities (e.g., scientists and researchers) that possess, use, or transfer the 1918 strain of influenza or the eight key gene regions of the 1918 virus are required to register with the CDC. People, labs, and other facilities that work with select agents are required to ensure that they can safely handle the virus as outlined in the CDC/NIH Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories, 5th edition. In addition, they are required to increase safeguards and security measures for thevirus, including controlling access, screening personnel, and maintaining records to be included in a national database with records from others registered. The Act imposes criminal and civil penalties for inappropriate use of select agents and toxins. . . .

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To access the complete press release, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/r051020.htm
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October 24, 2005
2003 INFLUENZA VACCINATION RATES FOR ELDERLY AND HIGH-RISK PERSONS FELL SHORT OF NATIONAL OBJECTIVES

CDC published "Influenza Vaccination Levels Among Persons Aged 65 Years [and Older] and Among Persons Aged 18-64 Years with High-Risk Conditions--United States, 2003" in the October 21 issue of MMWR. Portions of the article are reprinted below.

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Influenza vaccination is an effective tool for preventing hospitalization and death among persons aged 65 years [and older] and among persons aged 18-64 years with medical conditions that increase the risk for influenza-related complications. Two national health objectives for 2010 are to increase influenza vaccination coverage to 90% among persons aged 65 years [and older] and to 60% among persons aged 18-64 years who have one or more high-risk conditions (objectives 14-29a and 14-29c, respectively). To determine influenza vaccination coverage among persons in both targeted groups, CDC analyzed data from the 2003 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which determined that influenza vaccination coverage among persons aged 65 years [and older] and persons aged 18-64 years with high-risk conditions remains substantially below 2010 target levels. In addition, racial/ethnic disparities in coverage levels persist in both targeted populations. To improve overall influenza vaccination coverage and reduce racial/ethnic disparities, combinations of evidence-based effective interventions should be implemented, and the influenza vaccine supply should be stabilized. . . .

In 2003, influenza vaccination levels varied by age group, race/ethnicity, presence of high-risk medical conditions, and other characteristics. Coverage among persons aged 65 years [and older] was 65.6%. Racial/ethnic-specific estimates of coverage were 68.7% for non-Hispanic whites, 48.0% for non-Hispanic blacks, and 45.4% for Hispanics. Combining the three racial/ethnic populations, the following characteristics were associated with lower coverage levels: age 65-74 years, less than a high school education, income below the poverty threshold, no supplemental health insurance, no high-risk conditions, and fewer doctor visits in the preceding 12 months. Among persons aged 18-64 years with high-risk conditions, influenza vaccination coverage was 34.1%. Racial/ethnic-specific estimates of coverage among persons aged 18-64 years with high-risk conditions were 35.8% for non-Hispanic whites, 30.4% for non-Hispanic blacks, and 27.0% for Hispanics. Characteristics associated with lower coverage levels in the combined racial/ethnic groups were age 18-49 years, less than high school education, income near (100%-199%) or below ([less than] 100%) the poverty threshold, no health insurance, and fewer doctor visits during the preceding 12 months. Among Hispanics aged 18 years [and older], those who were interviewed in Spanish had a vaccination coverage level that was nearly two-thirds the level for those interviewed in English. Among persons aged 50-64 years, influenza vaccination coverage was 46.3% for persons with high-risk conditions and 32.7% for persons without high-risk conditions. . . .

Editorial Note
The findings in this report indicate that influenza vaccination coverage since 2000 has increased only slightly among non-Hispanic whites and non-Hispanic blacks aged 65 years [and older] and among younger adults with high-risk conditions and decreased among Hispanics aged 65 years [and older]. Given these trends, the national health targets for influenza vaccination coverage of 90% for persons aged 65 years [and older] and 60% for persons aged 18-64 years with one or more high-risk condition will not be met by 2010. In addition, racial/ethnic disparities in coverage levels were observed, with lower coverage among non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics than among non-Hispanic whites of both targeted populations. These disparities underscore the need to implement more widespread effective interventions (e.g., standing orders and provider and patient reminders), especially among certain racial/ethnic populations, to achieve national objectives for influenza vaccination coverage among persons aged 65 years [and older] and persons aged 18-64 years with high-risk conditions. . . .

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To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5441a3.htm
 
To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5441.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html
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October 24, 2005
SURVEY INDICATES ONLY 13 PERCENT OF PREGNANT WOMEN RECEIVED INFLUENZA VACCINATION DURING THE 2003-04 INFLUENZA SEASON

CDC published "Influenza Vaccination in Pregnancy: Practices Among Obstetrician-Gynecologists--United States, 2003-04 Influenza Season" in the October 21 issue of MMWR. Portions of the article are reprinted below.

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Women infected with influenza virus during pregnancy are at increased risk for serious complications and hospitalization. During 1997-2003, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) included healthy pregnant women who would be in their second or third trimester of pregnancy during the influenza season among those persons at high risk for whom influenza vaccination was indicated. Also included were women at any stage of pregnancy with certain chronic medical conditions, such as asthma, diabetes mellitus, or heart disease. ACIP emphasized that the influenza vaccine was safe for breastfeeding mothers and their infants and that household contacts of children aged [younger than] 2 years also should be vaccinated. However, despite these recommendations, only 13% of pregnant women received influenza vaccination in 2003. To assess understanding of the ACIP recommendations among obstetrician-gynecologists (OB/GYNs), the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), with support from CDC, surveyed a national sample of OB/GYNs in May 2004. This report describes the results of that survey, which indicated that 52% of OB/GYNs surveyed would recommend influenza vaccination for a healthy woman in the first trimester of pregnancy, 95% would recommend the vaccine for a healthy pregnant woman beyond the first trimester, and 63% would recommend vaccination for a woman with a medical condition in the first trimester. However, of the physicians who would recommend vaccination, 36%-38% reported that influenza vaccination was not offered in their practices. Increased efforts are needed to improve vaccine availability and to educate OB/GYNs regarding the updated ACIP recommendations on the use of influenza vaccine in the first trimester for both healthy pregnant women and pregnant women at high risk. . . .

Editorial Note

. . . In May 2004, after the survey was conducted, ACIP published simplified recommendations, which stated that vaccination is recommended in any trimester for healthy pregnant women and pregnant women with high-risk medical conditions. . . .

Evaluation efforts are needed to assess knowledge and practices of OB/GYNs since the updated 2004-05 ACIP recommendations, which added recommendations for pregnant women in the first trimester. Pregnant women infected with influenza virus are at risk for serious medical complications that are potentially preventable with influenza vaccination. In addition, postpartum vaccination of women is an important means of protecting young infants from influenza, particularly because children [younger than] 6 months are at high risk for influenza-related complications but cannot be vaccinated themselves. CDC and ACOG will continue to monitor influenza vaccine use among pregnant women and the knowledge and practices of OB/GYNs regarding vaccine recommendations.

Educational materials for both physicians and pregnant women, such as those that have been successful for other obstetric concerns, regarding the risk for influenza complications for pregnant women and children aged [younger than] 6 months and the use of influenza vaccine for pregnant, postpartum, and breastfeeding women are needed to increase influenza vaccination coverage among these women. . . . Further research is needed to determine effective strategies for increasing influenza vaccine availability in the obstetrics-gynecology setting. OB/GYNs can play a pivotal role in helping to protect women and newborns from this vaccine-preventable disease. Achieving optimal compliance with current recommendations is important for reducing maternal and infant morbidity from influenza.

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To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5441a4.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5441.pdf
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October 24, 2005
OCTOBER ISSUE OF CDC'S IMMUNIZATION WORKS ELECTRONIC NEWSLETTER NOW AVAILABLE ON THE NIP WEBSITE

The October issue of Immunization Works, a monthly email newsletter published by CDC, is available on NIP's website. The newsletter offers members of the immunization community non-proprietary information about current topics. CDC encourages its wide dissemination.

Some of the information in the October issue has already appeared in previous issues of IAC Express. Following is the text of four articles we have not covered.

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INFLUENZA VACCINE SUPPLY, RECOMMENDATIONS & RESOURCES

The 2005-06 influenza vaccination effort is shifting into high gear around the country. According to CDC recommendations, October and November are the optimal months for influenza vaccination. This year, four companies are licensed to sell influenza vaccine in the United States: sanofi pasteur, Inc., MedImmune Vaccines, Inc., GlaxoSmithKline, and Chiron Vaccines, Ltd.

As of today's date [10/14/05], all four companies are currently distributing their vaccine (see FDA's website http://www.fda.gov/cber/flu/flulot101205.htm). If all of the anticipated doses are distributed, the number of doses available will total between 89 million and 97 million. Last year, 61 million doses were available.

While the nation's total influenza vaccine supply forecast appears promising, as in several recent past seasons, some uncertainty remains. Given this uncertainty, CDC continues to recommend that inactivated vaccine be reserved for the following priority groups until October 24, 2005:

  • Persons aged 65 years [and older] with comorbid conditions
  • Residents of long-term care facilities
  • Persons aged 2-64 years with comorbid conditions
  • Persons aged 65 years [and older] without comorbid conditions
  • Children aged 6-23 months
  • Pregnant women
  • Healthcare personnel who provide direct patient care
  • Household contacts and out-of-home caregivers of children aged [younger than] 6 months

These groups correspond to inactivated vaccine priority groups that were published previously in CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Report (MMWR) in the event of a vaccination supply disruption (please see http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5430a4.htm).

It is important to note that certain persons within the priority groups above are also eligible for the live, intranasal influenza vaccine (LAIV). LAIV influenza vaccine is approved for healthy children and adults from 5 through 49 years of age, including most healthcare workers and household contacts of most people at high risk for influenza complications. However, LAIV should not be given to pregnant women or people with certain medical conditions.

Beginning October 24, 2005, all persons will be eligible for vaccination with the inactivated vaccine. At this point, CDC encourages vaccination of anyone who wants to be vaccinated using the inactivated vaccine, in addition to continued vaccination of persons in the priority groups.

Key Influenza Resources
CDC Influenza Website: This website contains the latest influenza information for health professionals and the general public, including links to weekly surveillance reports, press releases, and educational materials. Please visit http://www.cdc.gov/flu In addition, this website links to other important CDC influenza resources including the flu gallery, http://www.cdc.gov/flu/gallery (contains patient and provider educational materials), the influenza vaccine bulletins, http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/flubulletin.htm (provide updates on the current vaccine supply situation), and a patient self-screening form, http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/pdf/early_screening_form.pdf (helps patients to determine whether or not they are in the priority group for inactivated influenza vaccine).

CDC INFO [Contact Center]: Staff at (800) CDC-INFO [(800) 232-4636] can help both health professionals and the general public find answers to specific questions they may have about influenza or other public health issues. This service is available in English and Spanish 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Influenza VIS: In July 2005, influenza vaccine was added to the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. CDC strongly urges the use of interim Vaccine Information Statements (VISs). When the final VISs are available, most likely in the next month, their use will be required. To obtain copies, please visit http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/VIS/default.htm#flu

The American Lung Association (ALA) Clinic Finder: This easy-to-use tool allows persons anywhere in the country to obtain information about what influenza vaccine clinics may be scheduled in their area. In addition, health professionals wishing to list clinics on the locator may do so free of charge. Please visit http://www.flucliniclocator.org for more information.

Health Industry Distributors Association (HIDA) Website: This website lists contact information for influenza vaccine distributors, regardless of their membership in HIDA. Please visit http://www.hida.org/document.asp?document_id=10082

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) website and hotline: The hotline and website provide information for health professionals about billing procedures, payment rates, and procedural issues as well as links to many other helpful sites. Please visit http://www.cms.hhs.gov/preventiveservices/2.asp CMS also offers Medicare beneficiaries information and answers to their questions about vaccination, particularly about Medicare coverage. Beneficiaries should call (800) MEDICARE [(800) 633-4227] or visit http://www.medicare.gov/health/flu.asp

OTHER IMMUNIZATION NEWS

IMMUNIZATION REGISTRIES HELP CHILDREN AVOID EXTRA SHOTS:
In Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, many people who had to evacuate lost not only homes and possessions but personal records such as their children's shot records. Whether some children are up to date on their shots or need to be vaccinated is being answered through existing immunization information systems. In Louisiana alone, CDC estimates that more than 8,300 queries were made to the Louisiana Immunization Network for Kids Statewide (LINKS) concerning evacuated children. Although special provisions are being made to accept students without proof of immunization into their new schools, having an immunization record provides extra assurance that no delays will occur, and no immunizations will be repeated unnecessarily. For more information about computerized immunization registries, please contact CDC's Gary Urquhart by email at gau5@cdc.gov or by phone at (404) 639-8277.

MEETINGS, CONFERENCES, AND RESOURCES

SAVE THE DATE: 7TH NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON IMMUNIZATION COALITIONS:
The 7th National Conference on Immunization Coalitions will be held from August 9-11, 2006, in Denver, Colorado. For details, please contact Roberta Smith (Colorado Influenza and Pneumococcal Alert Coalition, Adult Immunizations) at (303) 692-2332 or roberta.smith@state.co.us In addition, more information will be forthcoming in future editions of Immunization Works.

AVAILABLE NOW: THE SELF-STUDY VERSION IMMUNIZATION UPDATE 2005:
This program, originally broadcast on July 28, 2005, is now available as a self-study to be viewed at home or in the office. To access the Internet version, go to http://www.phppo.cdc.gov/PHTN/webcast/immup2005 To order the DVD, go to http://www2.cdc.gov/nchstp_od/PIWeb/niporderform.asp This specific update covers new recommendations for influenza vaccine, an update on the influenza vaccine supply, meningococcal conjugate vaccine, and acellular pertussis vaccine for adolescents. Continuing Education (CE) credits will be provided for this activity.

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To access the complete October issue from the NIP website, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/news/newsltrs/imwrks/2005/200510.htm
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October 24, 2005
INTERIM VIS FOR INJECTABLE INFLUENZA VACCINE NOW IN VIETNAMESE AND ARMENIAN; AUDIO AND VIDEO VISs AVAILABLE

Dated 7/18/05, the interim VIS for trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) is now available on the IAC website in Vietnamese and Armenian. IAC gratefully acknowledges the Orange County Local Health Department for the Vietnamese translation and the County of Los Angeles Immunization Program for the Armenian translation.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the interim VIS for TIV in Vietnamese, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/vn_flu05.pdf

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the interim VIS for TIV in Armenian, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/ar_flu05.pdf

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the interim VIS for TIV in English, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/2flu.pdf

AUDIO AND VIDEO FORMATS
In addition, the interim VIS for TIV is available in audio and video formats in English and Spanish. Audio and video VISs are intended for use with low-literacy patients. IAC is grateful to Healthy Roads Media for providing the audio and video versions. Healthy Roads Media offers health information in a variety of formats and languages. For information, go to: http://www.healthyroadsmedia.org

To access an English-language audio and/or video of the interim VIS for TIV, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/#influenza In the Inactivated Influenza Vaccine section, click on the link titled "English 7/18/05 (audio VIS*)" or "English 7/18/05 (multimedia 'movie' VIS*)."

To access a Spanish-language audio and/or video of the interim VIS for TIV, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/#influenza In the Inactivated Influenza Vaccine section, click on the link titled "Spanish 7/18/05 (audio VIS*)" or "Spanish 7/18/05 (multimedia 'movie' VIS*)."

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in a total of 33 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis
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October 24, 2005
MMWR INCLUDES CDC'S REPORT ON RECENT POLIO INFECTIONS AMONG FOUR MINNESOTA CHILDREN

CDC published "Poliovirus Infections in Four Unvaccinated Children--Minnesota, August-October 2005" in the October 21 MMWR. Previously, the article was available only in electronic format as an "MMWR Dispatch."

To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5441a6.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5441.pdf
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October 24, 2005
NEW: APHA ANNUAL MEETING MOVED FROM NEW ORLEANS TO PHILADELPHIA; DATE CHANGED TO DECEMBER 10-14

Owing to the devastation wrought by Hurricane Katrina, the American Public Health Association (APHA) relocated its annual meeting from New Orleans to Philadelphia. In addition, the meeting dates were changed from November 5-9 to December 10-14.

For comprehensive information about the meeting, go to: http://www.apha.org/meetings

 

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This page was updated on October 24, 2005