Immunization Action Coalition and the Hepatitis B Coalition

IAC EXPRESS

Previous issues index

Home page

Issue Number 522            April 25, 2005

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE

  1. U.S. Congress accepts plan for major reorganization of CDC
  2. New: The 2005 annual report of the National Immunization Program now available online and in print
  3. April 24 marks the start of National Infant Immunization Week, now in its second decade
  4. New: CDC's commemorative timeline, 50th Anniversary of the Polio Vaccine, is posted on NIP's website
  5. Coming soon: The National Immunization Coalition TA Network plans two influenza teleconferences for May
  6. "Immunization Works," the statewide Iowa immunization conference, is scheduled for June 2 in West Des Moines

----------------------------------------------------------

Back to Top

---------------------------------------------------------------

ABBREVIATIONS: AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NIP, National Immunization Program; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
---------------------------------------------------------------

(1 of 6)
April 25, 2005
U.S. CONGRESS ACCEPTS PLAN FOR MAJOR REORGANIZATION OF CDC

CDC published "Notice to Readers: CDC Announces Landmark Reorganization" in the April 22 issue of MMWR. The notice is reprinted below in its entirety.

***********************

As the world copes with 21st-century health threats such as terrorism, avian influenza, and the unrelenting stresses of modern life, CDC has taken a landmark step in its readiness to confront these challenges. After notification by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on April 5, 2005, the U.S. Congress officially accepted CDC's plans for internal restructuring, making it official on April 21. These proposed changes will enable CDC to pursue its mission in preparing for new and unpredictable health threats and protecting the health and quality of life of all U.S. residents throughout their lives.

CDC is also changing to keep up with more complex health concerns such as childhood asthma, AIDS, catastrophic natural disasters, and a barrage of global health threats. During its most recent major transformation nearly 20 years ago, CDC had approximately 4,000 employees and a budget of $411 million. Today, its combined workforce of employees and contractors totals nearly 14,000, with a budget of approximately $8 billion. The agency is changing to meet 21st-century challenges such as new technology, complex information flow, and rising healthcare costs. Change also includes modernizing its management and accountability to realize tangible savings that can go directly to science and programs that affect public health.

This modernization involves a new organizational structure, including a framework for four new coordinating centers that will help CDC scientists combine their expertise to solve public health problems, streamline the flow of information for leadership decision-making, and better leverage the expertise of CDC partners. CDC has also added two new centers to focus on health informatics and health marketing, which are vital in translating scientific data into usable information and health messages that help U.S. residents make sound health decisions.
Additional information about the reorganization of CDC is
available at http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media

***********************

To access a web-text (HTML) version of the notice, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5415a8.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5415.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html
---------------------------------------------------------------

Back to Top

(2 of 6)
April 25, 2005
NEW: THE 2005 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION PROGRAM NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE AND IN PRINT

NIP's annual report for 2005, National Immunization Program: Immunization in the 21st Century, is available in two online formats and as a soft-bound print book:

ONLINE
To access the printable online version (by section), click here.

To access the screen-reader device version (by section), click here.

PRINT
To order one free copy, go to NIP's online order form at https://www2.cdc.gov/nchstp_od/PIWeb/niporderform.asp Look for item #99-6550 under the section Publications for Health Care Providers.

NIP is requesting readers' comments about the report. To make comments, send an email to uzr9@cdc.gov
---------------------------------------------------------------

Back to Top

(3 of 6)
April 25, 2005
APRIL 24 MARKS THE START OF NATIONAL INFANT IMMUNIZATION WEEK, NOW IN ITS SECOND DECADE

On April 22, CDC issued a press release, National Infant Immunization Week Urges Parents to Vaccinate: Annual Observance Enters 2nd Decade. It is reprinted below in its entirety.

*****************

For immediate release
April 22, 2005

NATIONAL INFANT IMMUNIZATION WEEK URGES PARENTS TO VACCINATE:
Annual Observance Enters 2nd Decade

The U. S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), will launch the second decade of National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW) with events beginning April 24 and continuing through April 30, 2005. Immunization has been cited as one of the ten great public health achievements of the 20th century.

For the second year, CDC will partner with the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), the United States-Mexico Border Health Commission (USMBHC), and more than 35 other nations for Vaccination Week in the Americas (VWA) in order to reach out to parents, caregivers, healthcare providers, and communities throughout the Western Hemisphere to highlight the need for routine infant vaccinations.

"We can now protect children from more vaccine preventable diseases than ever before," said Dr. Stephen L. Cochi, Acting Director of the National Immunization Program for CDC. "Millions of children have been vaccinated, and millions of cases of disease, disability, and death have been prevented."

Recently, several important milestones have been reached in controlling vaccine-preventable diseases among infants and adults worldwide:

  • July 2004: The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced that the nation's childhood immunization rates are at record high levels.
    [www.hhs.gov/news/press/2004pres/20040729.html]
     
  • March 2005: CDC announced that rubella is no longer a major health threat to expectant mothers and their unborn children, thanks to a safe and effective vaccine, high vaccine coverage, and parents' confidence in the vaccination recommendation.
    [www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/r050321.htm]
     
  • April 2005: marks the 50th anniversary of the introduction of the polio vaccine. "Safe, effective, and potent." On April 12, 1955, Dr. Thomas Francis Jr., director of the Poliomyelitis Vaccine Evaluation Center at the University of Michigan, School of Public Health, announced to the world that the Salk polio vaccine was up to 90% effective in preventing paralytic polio.
    [www.cdc.gov/nip/events/polio-vacc-50th]

Every day, 11,000 babies are born in the United States who will need to be immunized against 12 diseases before age two. Despite recent gains in infant immunization coverage, more than 20% of the nation's two-year-olds do not get fully immunized against infectious diseases to which they are especially vulnerable.

"A substantial number of children in the United States still aren't adequately protected from vaccine-preventable diseases," said Dr. Cochi. "The suffering or death of even one individual from a vaccine-preventable disease is an unnecessary human tragedy. Let us renew our efforts to ensure that no child, adolescent, or adult will have to needlessly suffer from a vaccine-preventable disease."

More than 500 NIIW events across the United States to promote and provide infant vaccinations will reflect this year's NIIW theme "Love them. Protect them. Immunize them."

To support NIIW, DHHS and CDC produced two 30-second English- and Spanish-language PSAs [public service announcements] titled "Love them. Protect them. Immunize them." The PSAs stress the importance of immunizing and protecting children ages two and younger from vaccine-preventable diseases. Each PSA features parents sharing their experiences about barriers to vaccinating their infants and how they overcame these obstacles. The PSAs, set to begin airing during NIIW, will be sent via satellite to major markets throughout the United States and are intended to be broadcast through April 2006.

The Department of Health and Human Services' mission is to protect health and give a special helping hand to those who need assistance. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention protects people's health and safety by preventing and controlling diseases and injuries; enhances health decisions by providing creditable information on critical health issues; and promotes healthy living through strong partnerships with local, national, and international organizations. For more information, please visit www.cdc.gov/nip or call (800) CDC-INFO [(800) 232-4636].

*****************

To access the press release on the CDC website, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/r050422.htm
---------------------------------------------------------------

Back to Top

(4 of 6)
April 25, 2005
NEW: CDC'S COMMEMORATIVE TIMELINE, 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE POLIO VACCINE, IS POSTED ON NIP'S WEBSITE

To mark the 50th anniversary of the announcement of the polio vaccine, CDC has developed a commemorative timeline. Titled 50th Anniversary of the Polio Vaccine, it charts major milestones in polio disease, vaccine, and eradication efforts. To access it, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/events/polio-vacc-50th/timeline.htm

To access an array of resources marking the 50th anniversary of the polio vaccine, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/events/polio-vacc-50th/default.htm
---------------------------------------------------------------

Back to Top

(5 of 6)
April 25, 2005
COMING SOON: THE NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION COALITION TA NETWORK PLANS TWO INFLUENZA TELECONFERENCES FOR MAY

The National Immunization Coalition TA [technical assistance] Network has scheduled two teleconferences on influenza for May. The network is a program of the Center for Health Communication, Academy for Educational Development.

(1) The first, Gearing Up for the Upcoming Flu Season, is scheduled for May 17, 1PM ET. Facilitators are L.J. Tan, PhD, infectious diseases director, American Medical Association, and Raymond Strikas, MD, medical director, CDC. They will provide updates on the 2005-06 influenza season based on discussions held during the National Influenza Vaccine Summit. The updates will include the status of influenza vaccine supply as discussed by manufacturer; clarification, if needed, on ordering vaccine; and action items that emerge from the summit.

To register, email Katherine Shrout at kshrout@aed.org In your email, include this message: "Sign me up for the Flu Season call."

(2) The second, Communication Challenges Facing Us in the Upcoming Influenza Season, is scheduled for May 24, 1PM ET. The facilitator is Glen Nowak, PhD, acting director of media relations, CDC. He will relate the probable communication challenges for 2005-06 (as discussed at the National Influenza Vaccine Summit), ways to address them, and communication-related "lessons learned" from the 2004-05 influenza season.

To register, email Katherine Shrout at kshrout@aed.org In your email, include this message: "Sign me up for the Communication Challenges call."
---------------------------------------------------------------

Back to Top

(6 of 6)
April 25, 2005
"IMMUNIZATION WORKS," THE STATEWIDE IOWA IMMUNIZATION CONFERENCE, IS SCHEDULED FOR JUNE 2 IN WEST DES MOINES

The Immunization Program, Iowa Department of Public Health, has scheduled "Immunization Works," the statewide Iowa immunization conference, for June 2 at the Hy-Vee Convention Center, West Des Moines. Attendance of more than 500 is anticipated.

The conference is intended for nurses, nurse practitioners, medical assistants, public health staff, physicians, physician assistants, and medical and nursing students. Speakers include William Atkinson, MD, MPH, NIP/CDC, and Paul Offit, MD, Vaccine Education Center, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

For additional information, contact Becky Woodcock at Training Resources at (515) 309-3315 or info@trainingresources.org

 

Immunization Action Coalition1573 Selby AvenueSt. Paul MN 55104
E-mail: admin@immunize.org Web: http://www.immunize.org/
Tel: (651) 647-9009Fax: (651) 647-9131

This page was updated on April 27, 2005