Immunization Action Coalition and the Hepatitis B Coalition

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Issue Number 520            April 11, 2005

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE

  1. New: CDC issues interim VIS for meningococcal vaccine
  2. New: Comprehensive Vaccine Storage and Handling Toolkit now available on the NIP website
  3. 50th anniversary of the discovery of polio vaccine inspires exhibits, events, and articles
  4. New: NIIW PSAs for television stations will be available by satellite downlink on April 12 and 14
  5. CDC issues an update on U.S. influenza activity for the 2004-05 season
  6. Conference on the Public's Health & the Law in the 21st Century is set for June 13-15 in Atlanta

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ABBREVIATIONS: AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NIP, National Immunization Program; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
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April 11, 2005
NEW: CDC ISSUES INTERIM VIS FOR MENINGOCOCCAL VACCINE

On April 4, NIP posted an interim VIS for meningococcal vaccine. Dated 4/4/05, the VIS replaces the previous meningococcal VIS dated 7/28/03. The VIS was substantially revised to reflect information about the newly licensed meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4; trade name Menactra). The 7/28/03 VIS reflected information about meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine only (MPSV4; trade name Menomune).

The 7/28/03 VIS is still valid for Menomune, and providers can continue to use it if they wish. The 4/4/05 VIS, however, is valid for Menomune and Menactra; it MUST be used for Menactra.

It is anticipated that meningococcal vaccine will be added to the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program later in 2005. When that happens, the 4/4/05 interim VIS will be republished with a new date.

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of the 4/4/05 VIS from the NIP website, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/VIS/vis-mening.pdf

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of it from the IAC website, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/menin05.pdf

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in a total of 32 languages, visit IAC's VIS web section at http://www.immunize.org/vis
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April 11, 2005
NEW: COMPREHENSIVE VACCINE STORAGE AND HANDLING TOOLKIT NOW AVAILABLE ON THE NIP WEBSITE

On March 29, NIP posted a new professional-education resource on its website. Titled Vaccine Storage and Handling Toolkit, it features 11 chapters of information, numerous online resources, and two videos, How to Protect Your Vaccine Supply (2003 version) and 10 Top Vaccine Storage and Handling Errors. Note: How to Protect Your Vaccine Supply is currently being updated for 2005 and will be available later this year.

To access the toolkit, go to:
http://www2a.cdc.gov/nip/isd/shtoolkit/splash.html

The toolkit requires Windows Media 9 Player, Macromedia Flash 7 Player, and Acrobat Reader 6, all of which can be installed at no charge. For installation information, go to:
http://www2a.cdc.gov/nip/isd/shtoolkit/helpinstall.html
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April 11, 2005
50TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE DISCOVERY OF POLIO VACCINE INSPIRES EXHIBITS, EVENTS, AND ARTICLES

Tuesday, April 12, 2005, is the 50th anniversary of the day microbiologist Dr. Thomas Francis Jr. addressed a crowd in an auditorium at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Francis, who directed the field studies of the polio vaccine, told the crowd that a team of scientists led by Jonas Salk had perfected a vaccine that prevented all three types of poliomyelitis virus. "The vaccine works," Francis said. "It's safe, effective, and potent."

Universities and the Smithsonian Institution are marking this historic occasion with exhibits, events, and articles. Following is information about some of them, as well as links to other polio-related resources.

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN RESOURCES
The site of the Salk vaccine field trials, the University of Michigan is centering its commemorative events on the presentation of the Thomas Francis Jr. Medal in Global Public Health.

To access information about the medal, the field trials, and an extensive listing of links to related resources within and beyond the University of Michigan, go to: http://www.polio.umich.edu

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH RESOURCES
The University of Pittsburgh, where the vaccine was discovered, offers resources on a polio web page, Remembering Polio: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Salk Polio Vaccine. To access it, go to: http://www.polio.pitt.edu

To access The Shot Heard Round the World, an interactive timeline about the history of polio and the development of the vaccine, go to: http://museum.pharmacy.pitt.edu/salk

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION EXHIBIT AND ARTICLES
Exhibit. On April 12, "Whatever Happened to Polio?" a yearlong exhibit, opens at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. It tells the story of the U.S. polio epidemic, the vaccine's development, current global efforts to stop polio transmission, and polio survivors. Highlights include a working miniature iron lung and a pair of Franklin D. Roosevelt's leg braces. Constructed on the principles of Universal Design, the exhibit exceeds current federal standards for disability accessibility.

To access information about the exhibit, click here.

Articles. In anticipation of the 50th anniversary, Smithsonian magazine published two articles, Conquering Polio (published April 2005) and Mission Impossible (published February 2003).

To access Conquering Polio in ready-to-print (PDF) format, click here.

To access Mission Impossible in ready-to-print (PDF) format, click here.

"END OF POLIO" PHOTOMONTAGE
In the "End of Polio," Brazilian photographer Sebastiao Salgado tells the story of third-world efforts to eradicate polio. To access his photographs, go to: http://www.endofpolio.org

ROTARY INTERNATIONAL POLIO PLUS PROGRAM
In 1985, Rotary International launched the Polio Plus program to protect children worldwide from the consequences of polio. Working with partner agencies such as WHO, UNICEF, and CDC, the program has achieved a 99 percent reduction in the number of global polio cases.

To access information about Polio Plus, go to:
http://www.rotary.org/foundation/polioplus

CDC'S STOP (STOP TRANSMISSION OF POLIO) TEAMS
Health professionals interested in working to eradicate polio are eligible for three-month non-salaried field assignments as part of CDC's STOP Teams.

For comprehensive information, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/global/stopteam.htm

MMWR NOTICE TO READERS
In the April 8 issue of MMWR, CDC notified readers about the anniversary. To access a web-text (HTML) version of "Notice to Readers: 50th Anniversary of the First Effective Polio Vaccine--April 12, 2005," go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5413a5.htm

IAC RESOURCES
Two IAC websites, (www.immunize.org and www.vaccineinformation.org), offer health professionals and the public an array of resources, including journal articles, recommendations, state laws, case histories, photos, and more. To access them, go to: http://www.immunize.org/polio

To access photos related to polio, go to: http://www.vaccineinformation.org/polio/photos.asp

To access videos related to polio, including three gripping public service announcements from UNICEF, go to: http://www.vaccineinformation.org/video/polio.asp
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April 11, 2005
NEW: NIIW PSAs FOR TELEVISION STATIONS WILL BE AVAILABLE BY SATELLITE DOWNLINK ON APRIL 12 AND 14

National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW) will be held April 24-30, in conjunction with the Pan American Health Organization's Vaccination Week in the Americas (VWA), scheduled for April 23-30.

On April 12 and April 14, NIP will be making English- and Spanish-language television PSAs (public service announcements) available to television stations by satellite downlink. The satellite feed is intended to make it easier for television stations to receive broadcast-quality PSAs. NIP encourages those involved in promoting NIIW in their communities to publicize the airing of the PSA to their local television stations by providing them with detailed satellite downlink information. To access this information, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/events/niiw/2005/05psa.htm#dl

Related resources, technical assistance teleconferences, were held March 29 and March 31. They are intended to educate program coordinators, health departments, coalitions, and others about the 2005 English and Spanish-language infant immunization campaign materials, television PSA satellite downlinks, and tips for local placement of NIIW campaign materials, especially through minority media outlets. To access materials from the teleconferences, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/events/niiw/2005/05teleconference.htm
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April 11, 2005
CDC ISSUES AN UPDATE ON U.S. INFLUENZA ACTIVITY FOR THE 2004-05 SEASON

CDC published "Update: Influenza Activity--United States, 2004-05 Season" in the April 8 issue of MMWR. Portions of the article and the Editorial Note are reprinted below.

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[From the article text]
This report summarizes influenza activity in the United States during October 3, 2004-March 26, 2005, updates the previous summary, and describes the composition of the 2005-06 influenza vaccine. Influenza activity was moderate in the United States overall, but varied by region. Preliminary data collected through the seven components of the CDC Influenza Surveillance System indicate that national influenza activity peaked in early-February. . . .

COMPOSITION OF THE 2005-06 INFLUENZA VACCINE
The Food and Drug Administration's Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee has recommended that the 2005-06 trivalent influenza vaccine for the United States contain A/New Caledonia/20/99-like (H1N1), A/California/7/ 2004-like (H3N2), and B/Shanghai/361/2002-like viruses. This recommendation was based on antigenic analyses of recently isolated influenza viruses, epidemiologic data, and postvaccination serologic studies in humans. Because of the growth properties of A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1) and B/Jangsu/10/2003 viruses, U.S. vaccine manufacturers will retain these antigenically equivalent strains for the inactivated vaccine. B/Jilin/20/2003 will be used for the live attenuated vaccine. At this time, the most likely candidate for the A/California/7/2004-like (H3N2) component will be A/New York/55/2004 (H3N2).

[From the Editorial Note]
Influenza activity during the 2004-05 season has been moderate in the United States. Activity steadily increased during January, peaked in mid-February, and has declined nationwide. Numerous influenza outbreaks associated with both influenza A and influenza B viruses have been reported in long-term-care facilities and among school children. Influenza B viruses have made up an increasing proportion of influenza isolates as the season has progressed, which is not unusual.

Although influenza activity for the 2004-05 season in the United States is declining, influenza should continue to be considered as a cause of outbreaks of respiratory disease because viruses are still circulating and use of antiviral drugs and other infection-control measures can substantially reduce morbidity and mortality in such situations. Recommendations on the use of these drugs and measures are available at http://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/antiviral/index.htm and http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/infectioncontrol

Based on pediatric hospitalization and mortality data collected since October 1, 2004, hospitalization rates and the number of influenza-associated pediatric deaths this season appear to be lower than the 2003-04 influenza season. However, as new data become available, cumulative rates reported for pediatric hospitalizations and the number of pediatric deaths might continue to increase. Because data collection is currently ongoing, any comparison of the data from this season with the previous is premature.

Influenza surveillance reports for the United States are published weekly during October-May and are available at http://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/fluactivity.htm or through the CDC voice ([888] 232-3228) and fax ([888] 232-3299, document number 361100) information systems.

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To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5413a2.htm

To access a ready-to-print (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5413.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html
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April 11, 2005
CONFERENCE ON THE PUBLIC'S HEALTH & THE LAW IN THE 21ST CENTURY IS SET FOR JUNE 13-15 IN ATLANTA

Planned for June 13-15 in Atlanta, a conference on the Public's Health & the Law in the 21st Century will feature a concurrent session on state quarantine law and one on childhood immunization exemptions and vaccine safety. For comprehensive information, go to: http://www.phppo.cdc.gov/od/phlp/Conference/con2005_overview.asp

 

Immunization Action Coalition1573 Selby AvenueSt. Paul MN 55104
E-mail: admin@immunize.org Web: http://www.immunize.org/
Tel: (651) 647-9009Fax: (651) 647-9131

This page was updated on April 11, 2005