Immunization Action Coalition and the Hepatitis B Coalition

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Issue Number 478            September 7, 2004

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE

  1. Viewing two "how-to" videos can help you and your staff deliver first-rate vaccination services
  2. Pharmacists: If you're looking for immunization resources, be sure to check out APhA's immunization information web section
  3. Update: IAC revises its patient-education sheet "Vaccinations for Adults: You're NEVER too old to get immunized!"
  4. UNICEF announces plan to vaccinate 7.5 million Madagascar children against measles this fall
  5. CDC describes actions that led it to recommend suspension of rotavirus vaccine after reports of intussusception

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ABBREVIATIONS: AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NIP, National Immunization Program; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
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September 7, 2004
VIEWING TWO "HOW-TO" VIDEOS CAN HELP YOU AND YOUR STAFF DELIVER FIRST-RATE VACCINATION SERVICES

Can you believe it will take only an hour for you and your staff to brush up your knowledge of vaccination administration AND learn the finer points on vaccine storage and handling? The two videos described below make efficient use of your time and effective use of your staff-training budget.

In 35 minutes, "Immunization Techniques: Safe, Effective, Caring" will lead you and your staff through a thorough review of all aspects of vaccine administration. In 25 minutes, CDC's "How to Protect Your Vaccine Supply" will tell you how to ensure the quality of your vaccines, even during a power outage.

SIMPLY PUT, THESE VIDEOS ARE THE BEST AND MOST COST-EFFECTIVE TRAINING TOOLS YOU CAN FIND. No practice or clinic can afford to be without them. Order them today, and you and your staff will be ready for the busy influenza vaccination season ahead.

"IMMUNIZATION TECHNIQUES: SAFE, EFFECTIVE, CARING"
Developed by the California Department of Health Services Immunization Branch and a team of national experts, this 35-minute video is designed for use as a "hands-on" instructional program. It can be used to train new staff and to provide a refresher course for experienced staff who administer vaccines.

It teaches best practices for administering intramuscular (IM) and subcutaneous (SC) vaccines to infants, children, and adults and discusses the following:

  • Anatomic sites
  • Choice of needle size
  • Vaccines and routes of administration
  • How to "draw up" doses of vaccine from a vial

People of various ages--from infants to adults--are vaccinated in the video to demonstrate these techniques. The video comes with presenter's notes that include instructional objectives, pre- and post-tests, photos showing vaccination sites appropriate for vaccinating people of different ages, and a skills checklist to help you document that your staff is well trained.

IAC distributes the video and presenter's notes at $30 per set (to U.S. addresses). For additional information about the video and to order online, or by mail, fax, or purchase order, go to: https://www.immunize.org/iztech

For additional information, contact IAC by email at admin@immunize.org or by phone at (651) 647-9009.

"HOW TO PROTECT YOUR VACCINE SUPPLY"
Produced by CDC in 2004, this 25-minute video presents practical, up-to-date information on all aspects of vaccine storage and handling. It covers temperature monitoring equipment, required documentation and record-keeping, storage and handling procedures, and action steps to take when a problem occurs.

ORDERING FROM NIP. You can order one free copy from NIP. To order online, go to the online order form at https://www2.cdc.gov/nchstp_od/PIWeb/niporderform.asp The video is product number 00-6526. A BETA master tape is also available if you want to reproduce the video in bulk.

To order one copy by phone, call the CDC Immunization Information Hotline at (800) 232-2522.

To play the video online, using Windows Media Player, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/default.htm#videos

ORDERING FROM IAC. You can order single or multiple copies from IAC for $15 per copy (discount pricing is available for orders of 20 or more). When you order, you'll also receive a packet of IAC's vaccine storage and handling print materials to assist you in establishing your protocols. For additional information about the video and to order online, or by mail, fax, or purchase order, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vachandling

For additional information, contact IAC by email at admin@immunize.org or by phone at (651) 647-9009.
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September 7, 2004
PHARMACISTS: IF YOU'RE LOOKING FOR IMMUNIZATION RESOURCES, BE SURE TO CHECK OUT APhA'S IMMUNIZATION INFORMATION WEB SECTION

The American Pharmacists Association (APhA) describes its Immunization Information web section as "pharmacists' gateway to information from CDC and other immunization resources." The web section offers pharmacists electronic access to an extensive range of immunization resources, including URLs for journal articles on current immunization issues, ACIP recommendations, CDC provider- and patient-education materials, the APhA certificate training program in pharmacy-based immunization, materials from vaccine manufacturers, and much more. To access the immunization web section, go to: http://www.aphanet.org/pharmcare/ImmunizationInformation.htm

APhA also produces a listserv for immunizing pharmacists. To view the issue for August 31, 2004, go to: http://www.aphanet.org/pharmcare/listserv0831.htm

To subscribe, send an email to apha-immpharm-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

APHA CALLS FOR PHARMACISTS TO GET IMMUNIZED AGAINST INFLUENZA

APhA recently issued a call to action urging pharmacists to be vaccinated against influenza before the upcoming influenza season. In addition, the association is encouraging pharmacists and pharmacy staff members to wear buttons with the message "I got my flu shot . . . how about you?" The buttons are intended to persuade pharmacy patients to be vaccinated. Other promotional materials include prescription vial auxiliary labels with the message "Get your flu shot. Ask your doctor or pharmacist."

The cost for five buttons is $3.50 (includes postage); the cost for 200 auxiliary labels and five buttons is $10 (includes postage). To order buttons and/or auxiliary labels, send an email message to Mitch Rothholz, RPh, at mrothholz@aphanet.org Include a mailing address, contact name, telephone number, and the items and quantities desired.
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September 7, 2004
UPDATE: IAC REVISES ITS PATIENT-EDUCATION SHEET "VACCINATIONS FOR ADULTS: YOU'RE NEVER TOO OLD TO GET IMMUNIZED!"

IAC recently revised its one-page patient-education sheet "Vaccinations for Adults: You're NEVER too old to get immunized!" The updated sheet presents a chart of the eight vaccines commonly given to adults, gives information about the age groups for which the various vaccines are indicated, and discusses the dosing schedule. Health professionals can save time by asking patients to read it while they are waiting to be seen.

To access a ready-to-copy (PDF) version of the updated sheet, go to: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4030a.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n18/p4030new.htm
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September 7, 2004
UNICEF ANNOUNCES PLAN TO VACCINATE 7.5 MILLION MADAGASCAR CHILDREN AGAINST MEASLES THIS FALL

In August, UNICEF issued a press release announcing that the largest measles vaccination campaign in Madagascar's history will take place from September 13 to October 8. The goal is to vaccinate 7.5 million children ages 9 months to 14 years.

Owing to the country's size (larger than France), rugged terrain, and incomplete electric service, campaign preparations have involved many levels of the government, non-governmental organizations, religious groups, and the military.

In 2000, measles caused nearly half of the world's 1.7 million childhood deaths related to VPDs. Though in Madagascar measles officially accounted for only 1% of all hospital-based deaths, only half of the country's children are fully immunized against the disease. The campaign is intended to avert a possible measles epidemic.

To access the press release, go to:
http://www.unicef.org/media/media_23081.html
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September 7, 2004
CDC DESCRIBES ACTIONS THAT LED IT TO RECOMMEND SUSPENSION OF ROTAVIRUS VACCINE AFTER REPORTS OF INTUSSUSCEPTION

CDC published "Suspension of Rotavirus Vaccine After Reports of Intussusception--United States, 1999" in the September 3 issue of MMWR. A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.

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When a potential vaccine reaction was discovered with the VAERS [Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System] surveillance system, CDC engaged in decisive action to suspend the vaccine's use and prevent future cases of RRV-TV related intussusception. [RRV-TV is the abbreviation for rhesus-human rotavirus reassortant-tetravalent vaccine.]

This report describes the emergency CDC response and follow-up investigations that identified and stopped the use of a vaccine found to cause a serious form of bowel obstruction called intussusception. A new vaccine was licensed in late 1998 to prevent severe complications of rotavirus diarrhea. On July 16, 1999, CDC recommended suspending use of the rotavirus vaccine after 15 reports of intussusception in infants who received the vaccine were received by the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System, a CDC and Food and Drug Administration vaccine safety surveillance system. No more reports of vaccine-related intussusceptions were received after July 16, 1999. CDC led surveillance activities and follow-up studies with state, local, and federal partners that rapidly confirmed the association between the rotavirus vaccine and intussusception.

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To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5334a3.htm

To access a ready-to-copy (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5334.pdf

To receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements), go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

 

Immunization Action Coalition1573 Selby AvenueSt. Paul MN 55104
E-mail: admin@immunize.org Web: http://www.immunize.org/
Tel: (651) 647-9009Fax: (651) 647-9131

This page was updated on September 7, 2004