Immunization Action Coalition and the Hepatitis B Coalition

IAC EXPRESS

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Issue Number 385            May 19, 2003

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE

  1. CDC notifies readers about the end of the PCV7 vaccine shortage and reports on pneumococcal disease among vaccinees
  2. CDC's 2003-2004 Inactivated Influenza Vaccine Information Statement is now available
  3. Employment opportunity at the Immunization Action Coalition in St. Paul, MN
  4. New: IAC adds two more valuable web pages to its website
  5. Gripping "Photo Notebook of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases" and "Slide Set of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases" available
  6. HHS expands online health information for Asian Americans, Native Americans, and Pacific Islanders
  7. Last week's "ER" episode included a powerful immunization message. Please let NBC know you appreciated it!
  8. Free teleconferences update health professionals on immunizing adults against tetanus and diphtheria
  9. Position opening: PKIDS seeks Coordinator of Educational Outreach for its office in Vancouver, WA
  10. Many newly translated and revised Vaccine Information Statements are available on the IAC website
  11. Report of proceedings of the SIGN 2002 annual meeting now available on the Web
  12. CDC publishes an update of smallpox adverse events surveillance

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May 19, 2003
CDC NOTIFIES READERS ABOUT THE END OF THE PCV7 VACCINE SHORTAGE AND REPORTS ON PNEUMOCOCCAL DISEASE AMONG VACCINEES

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published a Notice to Readers, "Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Shortage Resolved," in the May 16 issue of the "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" (MMWR). The article is reprinted below in its entirety, excluding references  and a table of catch-up vaccination information.

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In February 2000, Prevnar, a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine manufactured by Wyeth Lederle Vaccines (Pearl River, New York), was licensed for use among infants and young children. Beginning in August 2001, the supply of Prevnar failed to meet demand, resulting in shortages for health-care providers and health departments. To conserve the limited supply and ensure protection of  children at highest risk, CDC published interim recommendations for vaccination that called for withholding vaccine from healthy children aged 2 years and older and deferring some doses for  healthy children aged less than 2 years. Despite the shortage, introduction of the vaccine has been associated with a 69% decline in invasive disease among children aged less than 2 years through 2001 (78% for vaccine serotypes and 50% for vaccine-related serotypes).

Vaccine production and deliveries are now adequate to permit a return to the routine vaccination  schedule. According to data from CDC tracking systems and the manufacturer, the average number of vaccine doses delivered monthly for each of the preceding 3 months exceeded the monthly estimated average national need, and all back orders have been filled in both the public and private sectors.

According to the original Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommendations and more recent guidance from CDC, all children aged less than 24 months and 24-59 months who are at increased risk for pneumococcal disease (e.g., children with sickle cell disease or anatomic asplenia,  chronic illness, a cerebrospinal fluid leak, a cochlear implant, or an immunocompromising condition) should be administered the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. In addition, providers should consider vaccine for all other children aged 24-59 months, with priority given to children aged 24-35 months, American Indian/Alaska Native and black children, and those who attend group child care.

A catch-up schedule is provided for children who are incompletely vaccinated. The highest priority for catch-up vaccination is to ensure that children aged less than 5 years at high risk for invasive pneumococcal disease because of medical conditions have received a complete series. Second priorities include vaccination of healthy children aged less than 24 months who have not received any  doses of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and healthy children aged less than 12 months who have not yet received 3 doses.

Because of the frequency of health-care provider visits for children during their first 18 months, catch-up vaccination might occur at regularly scheduled visits for most children who receive vaccines from  their primary-care provider; special notification should be considered for children who have completed their 15-month visit and are not scheduled to be seen again before the visit at age 2 years. Programs that provide vaccinations but do not see children routinely for other reasons also should consider a notification process to contact undervaccinated or unvaccinated children.

Reporting Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Among Vaccinees

CDC is investigating situations in which invasive pneumococcal disease occurs despite vaccination. Health-care providers are encouraged to report invasive pneumococcal disease occurring in children aged less than 5 years who have received 1 or more doses of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine to CDC through state health departments. If pneumococcal isolates are available from vaccinated children, CDC will perform serotyping to determine whether the strain is a type included in the vaccine. Additional information is available at
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/diseases/pneumo/PCV-survrpts/default.htm

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To obtain an HTML copy of the complete text of the article online, including the table of catch-up vaccination information, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5219a6.htm

To obtain a camera-ready (PDF format) copy of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5219.pdf

HOW TO OBTAIN A FREE ELECTRONIC SUBSCRIPTION TO THE MMWR:
To obtain a free electronic subscription to the "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" (MMWR), visit CDC's MMWR website at: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr Select "Free Subscription" from the menu at the left of the screen. Once you have submitted the required information, weekly issues of the MMWR and all new ACIP statements (published as MMWR's "Recommendations and Reports") will arrive automatically by email.
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May 19, 2003
CDC'S 2003-2004 INACTIVATED INFLUENZA VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT IS NOW AVAILABLE

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued the Inactivated Influenza Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) for the 2003-2004 influenza season. Dated 5/6/03, the new VIS is now available on CDC's website and the website of the Immunization Action Coalition (IAC).

To access a copy of the new influenza VIS in camera-ready (PDF) format, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/2flu.pdf

For information about the use of VISs, as well as VISs for additional vaccines (some in up to 28 languages), visit IAC's website at http://www.immunize.org/vis
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May 19, 2003
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY AT THE IMMUNIZATION ACTION COALITION IN ST. PAUL, MN

The Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) is looking for a full-time administrative assistant to join its crew of more than a dozen talented, friendly, dedicated people. If you live in the Twin Cities area and have administrative assistant skills (or know of someone who does), check out the job description and application instructions on IAC's website at http://www.immunize.org/admin/jobopp6.htm
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May 19, 2003
NEW: IAC ADDS TWO MORE VALUABLE WEB PAGES TO ITS WEBSITE

The Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) recently supplemented its website with two noteworthy new web pages: "International Organizations Preventing Disease Through Vaccination" and "Potential New Vaccines."

Located in the Miscellaneous section of the left column of IAC's homepage (www.immunize.org), "International Organizations Preventing Disease Through Vaccination" describes the work of 12 groups that operate on the international level to decrease disease by increasing vaccination rates. At least one link is given for each organization; more organizations will be added over time. To access the new web page, go to: http://www.immunize.org/international

Interested users can find "Potential New Vaccines" in the Topics of Interest section in the right column of IAC's home page. The new web page has links to journal articles describing advances in vaccine research. To access the new web page, go to: http://www.immunize.org/newvaccines
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May 19, 2003
GRIPPING "PHOTO NOTEBOOK OF VACCINE-PREVENTABLE DISEASES" AND
"SLIDE SET OF VACCINE-PREVENTABLE DISEASES" AVAILABLE

Two powerful visual aids--the "Photo Notebook of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases" and the "Slide Set of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases"--will be of interest to health departments and medical practices that don't already have them. Developed by the Immunization Action Coalition (IAC), the notebook and slide set are intended for clinic staff and community outreach workers who conduct immunization presentations. Whether they are viewed as photos on a tabletop or as slides on a screen, many people have found these images to be worth more than a thousand words each.

PHOTO NOTEBOOK
A three-ring binder holds 20 plastic-protected, 8"x10" color photographs of children and adults with vaccine-preventable diseases. Each picture is accompanied by simple text that explains the disease  portrayed. When you show your patients a picture of an infant with severe varicella disease and other infections, they will begin to understand the seriousness of the diseases that vaccines can prevent.

To view an image of the Photo Notebook, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/images/r2053.jpg

To order your own "Photo Notebook of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases" online (item R2053, $75 each), go to:
https://www.immunize.org/photobook/order_photonote.htm

The images also can be downloaded for free from IAC's website at:
http://www.immunize.org/photobook

Be sure to scroll down to the thumbnail images and click on the "live labels" next to them to view photos at different sizes.

SLIDE SET
The Slide Set contains eight more images than the Photo Notebook. To assist you with slide presentations, an English-language script comes with the Slide Set. A Spanish-language script is also available upon request. (The Puerto Rico Immunization Program generously provided the Spanish-language translation to IAC.)

To order a Slide Set online (item S3010, $25 each), go to:
http://www.immunize.org/slideset

To access the English-language script, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/3010slid.pdf

To access the Spanish-language script, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/3010-01.pdf

You may also order Photo Notebooks or Slide Sets by sending a check to IAC, Orders Dept., 1573 Selby Avenue, Suite 234, St. Paul, MN 55104, or faxing your order along with your credit card information to (651) 647-9131. Questions? Call (651) 647-9009 (no phone orders, please).

Please allow 3-4 weeks for delivery of these items.

If you would like to view more than 150 additional images of vaccine-preventable diseases, go to IAC's web page of Vaccine-Preventable Disease Photos at http://www.vaccineinformation.org/photos (This is one of IAC's most popular web pages--click the link and you'll find out why!)
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May 19, 2003
HHS EXPANDS ONLINE HEALTH INFORMATION FOR ASIAN AMERICANS, NATIVE AMERICANS, AND PACIFIC ISLANDERS

In recognition of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Tommy G. Thompson announced the launch of two new online health resources of special interest to Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and other Pacific Islanders.

The department's consumer oriented "healthfinder" website now includes a new section devoted to Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and other Pacific Islanders, which includes information on many health topics, including hepatitis B. Selected materials are available in Cambodian, Chinese, Hmong, Korean, Laotian, Samoan, Thai, Tongan, and Vietnamese. To access this website, go to http://www.healthfinder.gov/justforyou and click on the "Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders" link.

Complementing this website is a companion website, "Asian American Health," launched by the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) National Library of Medicine. The site features census data on major Asian American populations, background on cultural traditions and heritage, links to health policy offices, online medical databases, publications, and other organizations. Visit "Asian American Health" at http://asianamericanhealth.nlm.nih.gov
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LAST WEEK’S "ER" EPISODE INCLUDED A POWERFUL IMMUNIZATION MESSAGE. PLEASE LET NBC KNOW YOU APPRECIATED IT!

The end-of-the-season "ER" episode that appeared on Thursday, May 15, provided a powerful message on the value of vaccines. A nurse who reads IAC EXPRESS wrote to us, suggesting that we let NBC know that the program had great impact. This is what she wrote:

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I hope some of your staff saw "ER" last night. While volunteering in an international clinic, Dr. Carter saw a child with polio and another with pertussis. He and a team went out into the countryside to immunize persons awaiting their arrival; they took "DPT, MMR ..." Conversation followed from a disgruntled Dr. Carter, after learning an inappropriate antibiotic for pertussis treatment, only, was available as their resource, to another doctor. Dr. Lucca responded yes, the child likely would die, however, remember: "we immunized 200 persons here today---have you ever saved 200 lives in a shift in the ER back at home?" Priceless, is it not!?

Perhaps someone in your organization could find a way to notify the directors of "ER" re: this advocacy for immunization was very well received and thank them for this very touching program and its wonderful impact. My husband, who is not a health care employee, was truly touched and remarked on this "pro-immunization "advocacy brought forth in the show. Thanks!

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To read NBC’s plot summary, go to:
http://www.nbc.com/ER/episode_guide/203.html

Please let NBC know that you appreciated their message that immunization saves lives. You can do either of the following: Send an email message to ER@nbc.com Send your message via the U.S. Postal Service to one or both of the following contacts:

John Wells
Executive Producer, "ER"
4000 Warner Blvd.
Burbank, CA 91522

Joe Sachs, M.D.
Supervising Producer, "ER"
4000 Warner Blvd.
Burbank, CA 91522

Please reference Episode #175172, “Kisangani.”
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May 19, 2003
FREE TELECONFERENCES UPDATE HEALTH PROFESSIONALS ON IMMUNIZING ADULTS AGAINST TETANUS AND DIPHTHERIA

A series of free, hour-long teleconferences about tetanus and diphtheria prevention is ongoing through July 15. Four are still available for May, seven for June, and four for July.

Sponsored by the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, and the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy, the teleconferences are designed to assist physicians, nurses, and pharmacists in maximizing the protection of their adult patients against tetanus and diphtheria. The teleconferences provide practical information regarding the diseases, diagnosis, and use of the Td vaccine. Each teleconference consists of a 40-minute live presentation and a 20-minute interactive session, during which participants can ask questions and exchange comments. CME and CPE credit and CE contact hours are available to participants.

Teleconference participants will receive a monograph for home study, "Beyond the Rusty Nail: Assessing Risk and Ensuring Protection Against Adult Tetanus and Diphtheria." The monograph can be requested without participating in the teleconference.

To register, receive a monograph, or receive additional information, call (866) 295-9123 between 9 am and 8:30 pm ET.
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May 19, 2003
POSITION OPENING: PKIDS SEEKS COORDINATOR OF EDUCATIONAL OUTREACH FOR ITS OFFICE IN VANCOUVER, WA

PKIDS (Parents of Kids with Infectious Diseases) recently posted a job announcement for a Coordinator of Educational Outreach for its office in Vancouver, WA. The organization educates the public about infectious diseases, methods of prevention and transmission, and medical advances. It works to eliminate the social stigma surrounding infected persons and assists the families of children living with hepatitis, HIV/AIDS, or other chronic viral infectious diseases.

For a job description of the position and application information, visit the PKIDS website at
http://www.pkids.org/jobs.htm

For further information about PKIDS, go to: http://www.pkids.org
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May 19, 2003
MANY NEWLY TRANSLATED AND REVISED VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS ARE AVAILABLE ON THE IAC WEBSITE

The Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) has recently posted new translations and revisions to its Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) web page. It has (1) posted the revised PCV7 Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) in 12 languages; (2) added Cambodian translations of VISs for DTaP and hepatitis B vaccines; and (3) posted revised English-language VISs for DTaP, PCV7, IPV, Hib, hepatitis B, and varicella vaccines.

REVISED PCV7 VIS IN 12 LANGUAGES
Dated 9/30/02, the most recent VIS for pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) is now available on  the IAC website in the following languages: Armenian, Chinese, Farsi, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Punjabi, Romanian, Samoan, Serbo-Croatian, Tagalog, and Vietnamese. IAC gratefully acknowledges the California Department of Health for the translations.

To access a camera-ready (PDF) copy of the PCV7 VIS in Armenian from the IAC website, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/arpnPCV7.pdf

To access it in Chinese, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/chpnPCV7.pdf

To access it in Farsi, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/fapnPCV7.pdf

To access it in Japanese, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/jppnPCV7.pdf

To access it in Korean, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/kopnPCV7.pdf

To access it in Portuguese, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/prpnPCV7.pdf

To access it in Punjabi, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/pupnPCV7.pdf

To access it in Romanian, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ropnPCV7.pdf

To access it in Samoan, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/sapnPCV7.pdf

To access it in Serbo-Croatian, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/scpnPCV7.pdf

To access it in Tagalog, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/tapnPCV7.pdf

To access it in Vietnamese, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/vnpnPCV7.pdf


CAMBODIAN TRANSLATIONS OF VISs FOR TWO VACCINES
Cambodian-language VISs for diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis vaccine (DTaP) and hepatitis B vaccine are now available on IAC's website. IAC gratefully acknowledges the Minnesota Department of Health for the translations.

To access a camera-ready (PDF) copy of the Cambodian-language DTaP VIS from the IAC website, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/cadtap01.pdf

To access the Cambodian-language hepatitis B VIS, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ca_hpb01.pdf


REVISED ENGLISH-LANGUAGE VISs FOR SIX VACCINES
CDC recently made a minor revision to VISs for six vaccines. It changed the Web address for the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) to www.hrsa.gov/osp/vicp on VISs for the following vaccines: diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP), pneumococcal conjugate (PCV7), inactivated polio (IPV), Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), hepatitis B, and varicella. Note that CDC did not change the issue date of these VISs.

To access a camera-ready (PDF) copy of the revised VIS for DTaP vaccine from the IAC website, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/dtap01.pdf

To access the revised VIS for PCV7, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/pnPCV7.pdf

To access the revised VIS for IPV, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ipv-00.pdf

To access the revised VIS for Hib, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/hib99.pdf

To access the revised VIS for hepatitis B, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/hepb01.pdf

To access the revised VIS for varicella, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/varic99.pdf


For more information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in a total of 28 languages, visit IAC's VIS web page at http://www.immunize.org/vis
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May 19, 2003
REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIGN 2002 ANNUAL MEETING NOW AVAILABLE ON THE WEB

The 2002 annual meeting of the Safe Injection Global Network (SIGN) took place in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, on October 24-26, 2002. During the meeting many countries shared their experiences in managing the safe and appropriate use of injections through a systematic approach that included assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation.

To access an HTML version of the meeting report from the website of the World Health Organization, go to:
http://www.who.int/injection_safety/sign/meetings/past/Meeting2002/en/print.html

To access a camera-ready (PDF) version of the final report, go to:
http://www.who.int/injection_safety/sign/meetings/past/2002MeetingReport.pdf

Please note: The PDF file of the final report is large at 983 kb. Some printers cannot print such a large file. For tips on downloading and printing PDF files, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/tips.htm

To view the PowerPoint slide presentations, go to:
http://www.who.int/injection_safety/sign/meetings/past/MeetingPresentation2002/en

To visit the SIGN website, go to:
http://www.who.int/injection_safety/sign/en

To sign up for "SIGNPost," the SIGN electronic newsletter, go to: http://www.who.int/injection_safety/newsletter/SIGNPost/en
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May 19, 2003
CDC PUBLISHES AN UPDATE OF SMALLPOX VACCINE ADVERSE EVENTS SURVEILLANCE

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published "Update: Adverse Events Following Civilian Smallpox Vaccination--United States, 2003" in the May 16 issue of the "Morbidity and Mortality  Weekly Report" (MMWR). Five serious adverse events were reported during the most recent reporting period, April 26-May 2. The five serious events were one case of chest tightness with  electrocardiogram changes, one case of polyneuropathy, and three cases of atypical chest pain.

To obtain the complete text of the article online, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5219a5.htm

To obtain a camera-ready (PDF format) copy of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5219.pdf

 

Immunization Action Coalition1573 Selby AvenueSt. Paul MN 55104
E-mail: admin@immunize.org Web: http://www.immunize.org/
Tel: (651) 647-9009Fax: (651) 647-9131

This page was updated on May 19, 2003