Immunization Action Coalition and the Hepatitis B Coalition

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Issue Number 379            April 14, 2003

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE

  1. American Council on Science and Health posts immunization publications online
  2. April 30 is application deadline for NPI's 2003 Excellence in Immunization Awards
  3. It's National Infant Immunization Week
  4. India launches massive polio immunization campaign
  5. "End of Polio" website's photo essay chronicles the eradication of the long-prevalent disease
  6. New translations: Vaccine Information Statements for MMR available in nine additional languages
  7. Minnesota Department of Health's "Viral Hepatitis Compendium" a good resource for health professionals
  8. Free! Copies of "NEEDLE TIPS" (Summer 2002 issue) available for the asking
  9. CDC publishes an update of smallpox vaccine adverse events surveillance

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April 14, 2003
AMERICAN COUNCIL ON SCIENCE AND HEALTH POSTS IMMUNIZATION PUBLICATIONS ONLINE

The American Council on Science and Health (ACSH) has posted three publications on vaccination on its website. One publication, "The Promise of Vaccines: The Science and the Controversy," is a special report written for ASCH by pediatrician David R. Smith, MD, president, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock. The others, "Vaccinations: What Parents Need To Know" and "What's the Story? Childhood Immunizations," are adapted from the report. Each can be ordered from ACSH or downloaded from its website.

Following is a synopsis of each publication and the URL for each. Ordering information for hard copies is given after the last URL.

"THE PROMISE OF VACCINES: THE SCIENCE AND THE CONTROVERSY."
September 2001; 48-page report. For health professionals or the serious lay reader. Discusses vaccines, the science of immunity, advances in disease prevention resulting from vaccination, recent vaccine safety controversies, the concept of community immunity, and the possibility of preventing an increasing number of diseases through vaccination.

To access a camera-ready (PDF) version of the report, go to:
http://www.acsh.org/publications/reports/vaccines2001.pdf

"VACCINATIONS: WHAT PARENTS NEED TO KNOW." November 2001;
24-page booklet. For the general public. Summarizes the evidence on the benefits and potential risks of vaccines, with an emphasis on the vaccines used in routine childhood immunization, addresses common myths about vaccines, and discusses vaccine safety issues recently in the news.

To access a camera-ready (PDF) version of the booklet, go to:
http://www.acsh.org/publications/booklets/vaccinations2001.pdf

"WHAT'S THE STORY? CHILDHOOD IMMUNIZATIONS." November 2001;
4-page brochure. For the general public. Part of ACSH's "What's the Story?" brochure series. Briefly describes childhood immunizations and their benefits and discusses vaccine safety and the absence of a causal link between immunization and the development of autism, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, and other disorders.

To access an HTML version of the brochure, go to:
http://www.acsh.org/publications/story/vaccination/index.html

ORDERING INFORMATION
The report and booklet are $5 each; the brochure is $1. Discount rates are available for orders of 10 or more. To place an order using MasterCard or Visa, call (212) 362-7044.
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April 14, 2003
APRIL 30 IS APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR NPI'S 2003 EXCELLENCE IN IMMUNIZATION AWARDS

What better way to celebrate National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM) than by presenting the 2003 Excellence in Immunization Awards? On July 31 the National Partnership for Immunization (NPI) will kick off NIAM with a press conference in Washington, DC, followed by a luncheon for award recipients. April 30 is the application deadline for the awards.

The awards honor innovation in immunization services and recognize local and state programs that are making a difference in their neighborhoods, communities, counties, and states. Applications and nominations are being accepted in three categories: the Coalition/Partnership Award, the Addressing Disparities Award, and the Non-Traditional Partner Award.

For more information about the awards and to complete an application online, visit the NPI Web site at
http://www.partnersforimmunization.org/niam_award.html

For additional information, contact Mischka Garel at mgarel@hmhb.org or (703) 836-6110.

For information about NIAM, go to: http://www.partnersforimmunization.org/niam.html or contact Dena Wichansky Penner at dpenner@hmhb.org or (703) 836-6110.
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April 14, 2003
IT'S NATIONAL INFANT IMMUNIZATION WEEK

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published a Notice to Readers, "National Infant Immunization Week--April 13-19, 2003," in the April 11 issue of the "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" (MMWR). The notice is reprinted below in its entirety, excluding references.

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National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW) is April 13-19, 2003; this year's theme is "Love Them. Protect Them. Immunize Them." This week emphasizes the importance of timely infant and childhood vaccination. Vaccination is one of the most effective ways to protect children, especially infants and young children, from potentially serious diseases. Because of increased vaccination efforts in the United States, incidences of the majority of vaccine-preventable diseases have decreased approximately 99% from peak pre-vaccine levels. In 2002, a total of 37 measles cases, one diphtheria case, and no wild poliovirus cases were reported. Approximately 11,000 babies are born each day in the United States; they need approximately 20 doses of vaccine before age 2 years to protect them from 11 vaccine-preventable diseases. Although vaccination coverage levels are high for children of preschool-age, approximately 1 million children aged 2 years are missing 1 or more recommended vaccine doses.

During NIIW, states and communities will sponsor activities designed to highlight the need to achieve and maintain high childhood vaccination coverage rates. In addition, CDC will launch a new television public service announcement in English and Spanish and a Spanish-language immunization education booklet. Additional information about NIIW and childhood vaccinations is available from CDC's National Immunization Program at http://www.cdc.gov/nip or the National Immunization Information Hotline, telephone (800) 232-2522 (English) or (800) 232-0233 (Spanish).

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To obtain the complete text of the article online, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5214a6.htm

To obtain a camera-ready (PDF format) copy of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5214.pdf

HOW TO OBTAIN A FREE ELECTRONIC SUBSCRIPTION TO THE MMWR:
To obtain a free electronic subscription to the "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" (MMWR), visit CDC's MMWR website at: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr Select "Free Subscription" from the menu at the left of the screen. Once you have submitted the required information, weekly issues of the MMWR and all new ACIP statements (published as MMWR's "Recommendations and Reports") will arrive automatically by email.
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April 14, 2003
INDIA LAUNCHES MASSIVE POLIO IMMUNIZATION CAMPAIGN

The World Health Organization (WHO) announced the start of an enormous polio immunization campaign on April 7. Planned to last six days, the campaign will vaccinate more than 80 million children in six Indian states.

In 2002, northern India was the site of the largest polio epidemic in recent years, resulting in a six-fold increase in new cases compared with 2001. The epidemic occurred after the number of planned polio vaccination campaigns was reduced in India in 2002.

The current campaign follows two nationwide polio immunization rounds in January and February. Future campaigns will take place in June, September, and November. It will require at least as many campaigns in 2004 to interrupt wild poliovirus transmission.

To access a press release about the current campaign from the WHO website, go to:
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/releases/2003/pr30/en
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April 14, 2003
"END OF POLIO" WEBSITE'S PHOTO ESSAY CHRONICLES THE ERADICATION OF THE LONG-PREVALENT DISEASE

Early in 2001, Brazilian photojournalist Sebastiao Salgado began documenting the global effort to eradicate polio. Inspired to be a witness to the end of a disease whose recorded evidence can be traced to 1580 B.C., Salgado traveled to Somalia, Sudan, India, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Pakistan to create a photographic record of the last of the mass campaigns against polio. His beautifully composed black-and-white photographs are featured on the "End of Polio" website, along with explanatory text. To access the site, go to: http://www.endofpolio.org

Begun in 1988, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative has helped cut the global toll of polio paralysis from an estimated 350,000 to 1,925 in 2002. The goal for 2005 is global eradication certification. To offer financial help to reach the goal, go to: http://www.endofpolio.org/howtohelp.html
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April 14, 2003
NEW TRANSLATIONS: VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS FOR MMR AVAILABLE IN NINE ADDITIONAL LANGUAGES

The MMR Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) is now available on the Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) website in nine additional languages: Armenian, Chinese, Farsi, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Romanian, Samoan, and Tagalog. IAC gratefully acknowledges the California Department of Health for the translations.

To obtain a camera-ready (PDF) copy of the MMR VIS in Armenian, go to: http://www.immunize.org/vis/ar_mmr03.pdf

To obtain it in Chinese, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ch_mmr03.pdf

To obtain it in Farsi, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/fa_mmr03.pdf

To obtain it in Japanese, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/jp_mmr03.pdf

To obtain it in Korean, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ko_mmr03.pdf

To obtain it in Portuguese, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/pr_mmr03.pdf

To obtain it in Romanian, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ro_mmr03.pdf

To obtain it in Samoan, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/sa_mmr03.pdf

To obtain it in Tagalog, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/ta_mmr03.pdf

To obtain it in English, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/mmr03.pdf

For information about the use of VISs, and for VISs in a total of 28 languages, visit IAC's VIS web page at http://www.immunize.org/vis
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April 14, 2003
MINNESOTA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH'S "VIRAL HEPATITIS COMPENDIUM" A GOOD RESOURCE FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

[The following is cross posted from the Immunization Action Coalition's "HEP EXPRESS" electronic newsletter, 3/31/03.]

The November/December 2002 issue of the Minnesota Department of Health's "Disease Control Newsletter" is titled "Viral Hepatitis Compendium." A description of this project follows:

"This compendium of resources on hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) was compiled to clarify distinctions between the viral hepatitides and to facilitate diagnostic testing, reporting, and disease prevention and control activities. These resources were derived from recommendations and guidelines published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, and the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases."

This valuable resource is available online in PDF (camera-ready) format at
http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/dpc/ades/dcn/0211dcn.pdf
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April 14, 2003
FREE! COPIES OF "NEEDLE TIPS" (SUMMER 2002 ISSUE) AVAILABLE FOR THE ASKING

The Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) is giving away bulk copies (up to 50 per request) of the Summer 2002 issue of "NEEDLE TIPS" to make room for our new Spring 2003 issue.

If you have an immunization conference or an educational program coming up for health professionals, this is an excellent item to distribute.

Because supplies are limited, it's best to make your request right away. The free copies go quickly. Sorry, we can only mail orders to addresses within the United States.

To request copies, fill out the online form on IAC's website: http://www.immunize.org/oldnt

You will be asked to supply the following information:

  1. The number of copies you want (maximum 50)
  2. A description of how you plan to use the copies
  3. Your name and complete contact information, including mailing address, telephone number, and email address

For further information, please contact Pat Storti, office administrator, by email at pat@immunize.org
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April 14, 2003
CDC PUBLISHES AN UPDATE OF SMALLPOX VACCINE ADVERSE EVENTS SURVEILLANCE

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published "Update on Adverse Events Following Civilian Smallpox Vaccination--United States, 2003" in the April 11 issue of the "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" (MMWR). It includes reports on three new cases of myopericarditis. Excerpts from the article are reprinted below.

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During January 24-April 4, 2003, smallpox vaccine was administered to 31,297 civilian health-care and public health workers in 54 jurisdictions as part of an effort to prepare the United States for a possible  terrorist attack using smallpox virus. This report updates information on all vaccine-associated adverse events among civilians vaccinated since the beginning of the smallpox vaccination program and among contacts of vaccinees, received by CDC from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) as of April 4. . . .

As of April 4, seven cases of myopericarditis have been reported. Three are new reports and were received during March 31-April 4. . . .

No new cases of generalized vaccinia were reported, but five new cases of inadvertent inoculation (nonocular) were reported. No new ocular vaccinia cases were reported. During the vaccination program, no cases of eczema vaccinatum, erythema multiforme major, fetal vaccinia, post-vaccinial encephalitis or encephalomyelitis, progressive vaccinia, or pyogenic infection of the vaccination site have been reported.

During March 31-April 4, a total of ten other serious adverse events were reported: one case of acute  appendicitis, one case of pneumonia, five cases of atypical chest pain, one case of atypical chest pain with mild asthma, one case of new onset atrial fibrillation, and one case of MI [myocardial infarction] (Case 3). Four cases of acute MI were reported previously.

During March 31-April 4, a total of 58 other nonserious events were reported. . . .

During this reporting period, no vaccinia immune globulin was released for civilian vaccinees. No cases of transmission from civilian vaccinees have been reported. In addition, no cases of transmission from 19,508 health-care workers, 8,999 of whom have been followed for more than 1 month, have been reported. Seven cases of transmission from military personnel to civilian contacts have been reported.

Surveillance for adverse events during the civilian and military smallpox vaccination programs is ongoing; regular surveillance reports will be published in MMWR.

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To obtain the complete text of the article online, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5214a5.htm

To obtain a camera-ready (PDF format) copy of this issue of MMWR, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5214.pdf

 

Immunization Action Coalition1573 Selby AvenueSt. Paul MN 55104
E-mail: admin@immunize.org Web: http://www.immunize.org/
Tel: (651) 647-9009Fax: (651) 647-9131

This page was updated on April 14, 2003