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Issue Number 370            March 10, 2003

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE

  1. Updated "Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases" now available
  2. Second printing of "Parents Guide to Childhood Immunizations" now available from the National Immunization Program
  3. Updated: Revised "Guide for Vaccinating Pregnant Women" now on the National Immunization Program website
  4. Coming soon: National Infant Immunization Week is scheduled for April 13-19
  5. CDC reports on vaccination coverage among children enrolled in Head Start and licensed child care facilities and those entering school
  6. WHO's redesigned injection safety web pages include information about the Safe Injection Global Network
  7. New: CDC releases smallpox information for clinicians
  8. CDC clarifies catch-up schedule for Hib vaccine
  9. CDC reports on polio eradication in India
  10. CDC publishes update of smallpox vaccine adverse events surveillance
  11. Reader alert: April 15 is the date for Massachusetts' Annual Adult Immunization Conference

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March 10, 2003
UPDATED "EPIDEMIOLOGY AND PREVENTION OF VACCINE-PREVENTABLE DISEASES" NOW AVAILABLE

The Seventh Edition of "Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases" (the Pink Book) has been updated and reprinted. The updated information includes changes to the smallpox chapter and to some tables in Appendix A.

To order the second printing online from the Public Health Foundation for $25 (plus shipping and  handling), go to: http://bookstore.phf.org/prod171.htm

Order it by phone at (877) 252-1200 or (800) 418-7246; by fax at (301) 843-0159; or by email at phf@tasco1.com

To access a camera-ready (PDF) fully formatted version of the updated smallpox chapter, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/pink/smallpox.pdf

To access a camera-ready (PDF) fully formatted version of components of the updated Appendix A, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/pink/appendices.htm and click on the component(s) you want.
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March 10, 2003
SECOND PRINTING OF "PARENTS GUIDE TO CHILDHOOD IMMUNIZATIONS" NOW AVAILABLE FROM THE NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION PROGRAM

The second printing of the popular "Parents Guide to Childhood Immunization" is now available from the website of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Immunization Program.  Intended for parents, the 96-page booklet covers 12 childhood diseases and the vaccines that protect children from them. The appendix includes an immunization schedule, vaccination checklist, and  information about vaccine safety and vaccine side effects.

Health care providers can order up to 100 copies of the English-language version and up to six copies of the Spanish-language version.

Booklets can be ordered by phone at (800) 232-2522 or online from the "Publications for Providers and General Public" section of the National Immunization Program website at https://www2.cdc.gov/nchstp_od/PIWeb/niporderform.asp
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March 10, 2003
UPDATED: REVISED "GUIDE FOR VACCINATING PREGNANT WOMEN" NOW ON THE NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION PROGRAM WEBSITE

In November 2002, the National Immunization Program updated the English-language version of the  popular pamphlet "Guide for Vaccinating Pregnant Women." The Spanish-language version has not yet been revised.

The 15-page guide has a chart of routine and travel vaccines recommended or contraindicated during pregnancy and several pages of relevant passages from various recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP).

Changes were made in two areas:

  1. Since 1998, when the Guide was last revised, ACIP updated its recommendations about general immunization, smallpox, yellow fever, polio, rabies, anthrax, hepatitis A, and rubella. The revised Guide reflects the updated recommendations.
     
  2. Information was dropped about three vaccines: oral polio, cholera, and plague.

To access a camera-ready (PDF) version of the revised guide from the National Immunization  Program website, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/preg_guide.pdf

To access the HTML version, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/preg_guide.htm
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March 10, 2003
COMING SOON: NATIONAL INFANT IMMUNIZATION WEEK IS SCHEDULED FOR APRIL 13-19

Now in its tenth year, National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW) emphasizes immunizing infants  against 11 vaccine-preventable diseases by the age of two. Set for April 13-19--only five weeks from now--NIIW 2003 has this theme: "Love them. Protect them. Immunize them."

More than 500 communities across the nation are expected to participate in this important week by  planning community awareness and media events to promote infant immunizations to parents, care  givers, health care providers, and the general community.

To help in planning community activities, the National Immunization Program's NIIW web pages offer  ideas for creating an NIIW kickoff event. Sample public relations materials, posters, flyers, web-link  icons, tri-fold brochures, and other resources are also available.

To access these materials, go to the NIIW web pages at http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/niiw
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March 10, 2003
CDC REPORTS ON VACCINATION COVERAGE AMONG CHILDREN ENROLLED IN HEAD START AND LICENSED CHILD CARE FACILITIES AND THOSE ENTERING SCHOOL

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published "Vaccination Coverage Among  Children Enrolled in Head Start Programs, Licensed Child Care Facilities, and Entering School--United States, 2000-01 School Year " in the March 7 issue of the "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report"  (MMWR). A summary made available to the press is reprinted below.

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One of the national health objectives for 2010 is to maintain 95% or higher vaccination coverage  among children attending licensed childcare centers and kindergarten through postsecondary school.

National estimates of vaccination coverage among children in licensed child-care facilities, Head Start Programs, and those entering school have been published yearly since 1997 on the basis of reports  from federally funded immunization programs. Coverage reported for the 2000–2001 school year appears similar to that in previous years; however decreases in the number of programs reporting and the completeness of the reports do not permit national coverage to be estimated reliably. CDC is working with states and territories to assure that vaccination rates remain high among these children by implementing strategies for collecting and reporting coverage.

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To obtain the complete text of the article online, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5209a3.htm

To obtain a camera-ready (PDF format) copy of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5209.pdf


HOW TO OBTAIN A FREE ELECTRONIC SUBSCRIPTION TO THE MMWR:
To obtain a free electronic subscription to the "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" (MMWR), visit CDC's MMWR website at: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr Select "Free Subscription" from the menu at the left of the screen. Once you have submitted the required information, weekly issues of the MMWR and all new ACIP statements (published as MMWR's "Recommendations and Reports") will arrive automatically by email.
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March 10, 2003
WHO'S REDESIGNED INJECTION SAFETY WEB PAGES INCLUDE INFORMATION ABOUT THE SAFE INJECTION GLOBAL NETWORK

Immunization providers interested in international issues
regarding injection safety will want to bookmark the recently
redesigned injection safety web pages on the World Health
Organization (WHO) website.

As part of the redesign, the injection safety pages now include materials from the Safe Injection Global  Network (SIGN), a coalition of stakeholders aiming to achieve safe and appropriate use of injections throughout the world. The coalition has an annual meeting and publishes "SIGNpost," an electronic newsletter that facilitates informal discussions and experience sharing among its 800-plus worldwide subscribers.

To access SIGN materials, go to:
http://www.who.int/injection_safety/sign/en

To access and subscribe to "SIGNpost," go to:
http://www.who.int/injection_safety/newsletter/SIGNPost/en

The injection safety home page also has an array of useful information, including a printable brochure  on injection practices, a statement of the WHO injection safety strategy, and a framework for assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating national policies and plans for the safe and appropriate use of injections.

To access the WHO injection safety home page, go to:
http://www.who.int/injection_safety/en

To access a toolbox of resources for managing national injection policies, go to:
http://www.who.int/injection_safety/toolbox/en

To access resources from the Needle Safety web pages of Immunization Action Coalition website, go to: http://www.immunize.org/genr.d/needle.htm
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March 10, 2003
NEW: CDC RELEASES SMALLPOX INFORMATION FOR CLINICIANS

On March 3, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) began mailing smallpox information packets to 3.5 million clinicians nationwide as part of the agency's established plan to educate medical professionals about smallpox and the smallpox vaccine.

The packet includes up-to-date information that will help clinicians identify a case of smallpox, recognize and manage patients with an adverse reaction to the vaccine, and help others make  decisions about receiving the vaccine. It also includes an invitation for clinicians to join a registry that will provide real-time information to help them prepare for possible bioterrorism events.

An array of related information is available to clinicians from the following CDC websites:

CDC has also established a public information hotline for questions about smallpox and smallpox vaccine at (888) 246-2675 (English); (888) 246-2857 (Spanish); and (866) 874-2646 (TTY).
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March 10, 2003
CDC CLARIFIES CATCH-UP SCHEDULE FOR HIB VACCINE

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published "Erratum: Vol. 52, No.4" in the March 7 issue of the "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" (MMWR). The Erratum concerns the "MMWR QuickGuide," publication titled "Recommended Childhood and Adolescent Immunization Schedule--United States, 2003," dated January 31. According to the Erratum, the information about the minimum interval between dose one and dose two for the Hib vaccine was incorrect in "Table 1. Catch-up schedule for children aged 4 months-6 years."

The entire text of the Erratum follows.

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In the MMWR QuickGuide section titled "Recommended Childhood and Adolescent Immunization Schedule--United States, 2003," an error occurred in Table 1. In the "Dose one to dose two" column for Hib (6 wks), the second recommendation should read "8 wks (as final dose): if 1st dose given at age 12-14 months."

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To obtain the complete text of the Erratum online, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5209a5.htm

To obtain a camera-ready (PDF version) copy of "Recommended Childhood and Adolescent Immunization Schedule—United States, 2003," go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/wk/mm5204-immunization.pdf
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March 10, 2003
CDC REPORTS ON POLIO ERADICATION IN INDIA

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published "Progress Toward Poliomyelitis Eradication–India, 2002 " in the March 7 issue of the "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" (MMWR). Part of a summary made available to the press is reprinted below.

"In India, the incidence of polio decreased substantially from 1995 through 2001, with just 268 cases reported nationwide in 2001. A major regional resurgence of polio occurred in 2002 with a total of  1,556 cases reported nationwide (as of January 25, 2003). Of these, 1,337 cases occurred in the two northern states of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar. Large numbers of children remained susceptible to poliovirus infection due to low oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) coverage caused in part by less frequent and lower quality supplemental immunization activities (SIAs). SIA quality is being improved and  additional SIAs are planned for 2003. To eradicate polio in India will require effective partnership between the national and state governments as well as major international partners."

To obtain the complete text of the article online, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5209a2.htm

To obtain a camera-ready (PDF format) copy of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5209.pdf
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March 10, 2003
CDC PUBLISHES UPDATE OF SMALLPOX VACCINE ADVERSE EVENTS SURVEILLANCE

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published "Smallpox Vaccine Adverse Events Among Civilians--United States, February 25-March 3, 2003" in the March 7 issue of the "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" (MMWR). The article updates information published in the February 28 MMWR. Surveillance for adverse events during the civilian smallpox vaccination program is ongoing; regular surveillance reports will be published in MMWR.

Portions of the article are reprinted below.

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During the civilian smallpox vaccination program, CDC, the Food and Drug Administration, and state health departments are conducting surveillance for vaccine-associated adverse events. In the first  stage of the program, active surveillance is being conducted for potentially life-threatening, moderate-to-severe, and other serious adverse events and for vaccinia transmission to contacts of vaccinees. Nonserious events are reported through passive surveillance and are expected to be underreported. This report summarizes smallpox vaccine adverse events reported among civilians vaccinated as of February 28, 2003, and among contacts of vaccinees, received by CDC from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) as of March 3. . . .

During January 24-February 28, smallpox vaccine was administered to 12,690 civilian health-care and public health workers in 45 jurisdictions. No potentially life-threatening adverse events of a type known previously to be caused by smallpox vaccination have been reported as of March 3.

Two moderate-to-severe adverse events were reported. Both were probable cases of ocular vaccinia, and both were traced to contact with military personnel who received smallpox vaccine. . . .

Three other serious adverse events were reported. One case involved headache and dizziness; although headache has been reported after smallpox vaccination, the causal role of smallpox vaccine in this case is unknown. The other two events (cholecystitis and hypertension) are not known to be associated causally with smallpox vaccination. . . .

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The Editorial Note stresses "the importance of proper vaccination site care in preventing contact transmission of vaccinia virus and the need for vaccinees and unvaccinated persons who have contact with vaccinees to protect against contact transmission."

To obtain the complete text of the article online, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5209a4.htm

To obtain a camera-ready (PDF format) copy of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5209.pdf
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March 10, 2003
READER ALERT: APRIL 15 IS THE DATE FOR MASSACHUSETTS' ANNUAL ADULT IMMUNIZATION CONFERENCE

MassPRO, the health care improvement organization for Massachusetts, and the Massachusetts Coalition for Adult Immunization will hold the eighth Annual Adult Immunization Conference on April 15 at the Centrum Centre, Worcester, MA. Health care professionals involved with adult immunization in community, hospital, private practice, or long-term care settings are encouraged to attend.

Conference objectives include describing smallpox preparedness planning for Massachusetts, summarizing current adult immunization recommendations, reviewing successful pneumococcal immunization efforts in various care settings, describing strategies for immunizing underserved populations, and discussing methods for creating new resources for immunization activities.

For more information or to request a conference brochure, call Monique Cassidy at (781) 890-0011, extension 226, or email her at mcassidy.mapro@sdps.org

 

Immunization Action Coalition1573 Selby AvenueSt. Paul MN 55104
E-mail: admin@immunize.org Web: http://www.immunize.org/
Tel: (651) 647-9009Fax: (651) 647-9131

This page was updated on March 10, 2003