Immunization Action Coalition and the Hepatitis B Coalition

IAC EXPRESS

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Issue Number 365            February 10, 2003

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE

  1. New! IAC releases results from its 2002 Hepatitis B Birth Dose Survey
  2. New! IAC's latest professional education pieces make a strong case for giving all newborns hepatitis B vaccine in the hospital
  3. Revised: IAC updates the popular "Questions Frequently Asked About Hepatitis B" information piece
  4. Revised: IAC updates dosage information on its "Hepatitis A & B Vaccines" professional education piece
  5. Revised! CDC's updated MMR Vaccine Information Statement available on IAC's website in three languages
  6. New! CD-ROM on smallpox vaccination techniques now available
  7. Open meeting of IOM Committee on Smallpox Vaccination Program Implementation set for February 13 in Washington, DC
  8. CDC establishes Smallpox Vaccine Adverse Events Monitoring System
  9. CDC's AFIX strategy helps providers raise immunization coverage levels
  10. CDC releases guidelines on laboratory testing and result reporting of antibody to hepatitis C virus
  11. CDC compares HIV/STD risk differences for men who have sex with men and disclose their sexual orientation and those who do not disclose
  12. Reader alert! February 19 is deadline for abstracts for the National HIV Prevention Conference
  13. New edition! Comprehensive book on infection control in child care and preschool settings is updated
  14. Free! Get your "Immunization . . . Not Just Kids' Stuff" posters while they last
  15. New! European Vaccine Manufacturers announce website launch

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February 10, 2003
NEW! IAC RELEASES RESULTS FROM ITS 2002 HEPATITIS B BIRTH DOSE SURVEY

In January, the Immunization Action Coalition (CDC) released "Results from IAC's 2002 Hepatitis B Birth Dose Survey."

In October 2002, IAC emailed this survey to 50 state and 6 local hepatitis B coordinators. The survey  asked seven questions to determine if and how physicians and hospitals had changed their perinatal hepatitis B virus prevention practices since the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices issued its 2001 recommendation that all newborns be given the  hepatitis B vaccine before hospital discharge.

The 16 pages of results quote the coordinators' responses at length, giving an in-depth view of the current status of perinatal hepatitis B vaccination practices.

To access results of the 2002 survey, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/birthdose/survey02.htm

To read the results of last year's (2001) birth dose survey, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/birthdose/survey.htm

To access numerous resources about the birth dose from IAC's birth dose web page, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/birthdose
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February 10, 2003
NEW! IAC'S LATEST PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION PIECES MAKE A STRONG CASE FOR GIVING ALL NEWBORNS HEPATITIS B VACCINE IN THE HOSPITAL

The Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) supports giving ALL newborns hepatitis B vaccine prior to  hospital discharge as the best way to protect them from contracting hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. For this reason IAC has recently produced four new professional education pieces on this topic.

Following are brief descriptions of the pieces:

  • "States Report Hundreds of Medical Errors in Perinatal Hepatitis B Prevention: Avoid Tragic Mistakes--Vaccinate Newborns against HBV in the Hospital," by Teresa A. Anderson, DDS, MPH, and Deborah L. Wexler, MD. 2 pages; published 1/03.
     
    This piece summarizes numerous case reports that illustrate four common medical errors regarding perinatal HBV prevention. The authors conclude it is impossible to eliminate human error and urge giving the birth dose to all newborns before hospital discharge.
     
    To access the piece in HTML format, go to:
    http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2062.htm

    To access it in camera-ready (PDF) format, go to:
    http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2062.pdf

     
  • "Unprotected Babies: Two More Infants Chronically Infected with Hepatitis B Virus . . . the Medical Errors Continue." 1 page; published 1/03.
     
    The piece describes two cases involving HBsAg-positive mothers whose babies did not receive  appropriate postexposure prophylaxis before hospital discharge. Both children have become chronically infected with HBV.
     
    To access the piece in HTML format, go to:
    http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2127.htm
     
    To access it in camera-ready (PDF) format, go to:
    http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2127.pdf
     
  • "Hospitals & Doctors Sued for Failing to Protect Newborns from Hepatitis B Virus Transmission." 1 page; published 1/03.
     
    Failure to appropriately prophylax five infants born to HBsAg-positive mothers resulted in four instances of a hospital, obstetrician, and/or pediatrician being sued and one physician losing his license to practice medicine.
     
    To access the piece in HTML format, go to:
    http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2061.htm
     
    To access it in camera-ready (PDF) format, go to:
    http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2061.pdf
     
  • "Give the Birth Dose . . . Hepatitis B Vaccine at Birth Saves Lives!" by Deborah L. Wexler, MD. 1 page; revised 10/02.
     
    Citing the statistic that 90% of perinatal HBV infections can be prevented by postexposure prophylaxis given within 12 hours of birth, the author makes the case for the birth dose by giving examples of the many different ways unvaccinated infants become infected.
     
    To access the piece in HTML format, go to:
    http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2125.htm
     
    To access it in camera-ready (PDF) format, go to:
    http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2125.pdf
     
    To access an array of additional information about the birth dose from the IAC website, go to:
    http://www.immunize.org/birthdose

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February 10, 2003
REVISED: IAC UPDATES THE POPULAR "QUESTIONS FREQUENTLY ASKED ABOUT HEPATITIS B" INFORMATION PIECE

Since the Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) first published "Questions Frequently Asked About Hepatitis B" in 1993, it has been one of our most requested publications.

Thoroughly revised in January 2003, the four-page piece now reflects current information on the following: disease statistics, interpreting hepatitis B blood test results, and immunization recommendations. Phone numbers and web addresses for educational, support, and advocacy organizations have also been updated.

To access the revised piece in camera-ready (PDF) format, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4090.pdf

To access it in HTML format, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4090.htm
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February 10, 2003
REVISED: IAC UPDATES DOSAGE INFORMATION ON ITS "HEPATITIS A & B VACCINES" PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION PIECE

The Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) recently updated "Hepatitis A & B Vaccines: Be Sure Your Patient Gets the Correct Dose!" The one-page professional education piece now has information on the newly licensed combination vaccine Pediarix.

To obtain the revised piece in HTML format, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/2081ab.htm

To obtain it in camera-ready (PDF) format, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/2081ab.pdf
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February 10, 2003
REVISED! CDC'S UPDATED MMR VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT AVAILABLE ON IAC'S WEBSITE IN THREE LANGUAGES

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently made two modifications to the MMR Vaccine Information Statement (VIS). The revised version has added a web address for the Vaccine  Adverse Event Reporting System and updated the web address for the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program.

Dated 1/15/03, the revised VIS is now available on CDC's website in English. It is also on the website of the Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) in English, Spanish, and Turkish. IAC thanks Mustafa Kozanoglu, MD, a pediatrician in Adana, Turkey, and Murat Serbest, MD, pediatric hematologist, for providing the Turkish translation.

To obtain an English-language copy of the revised VIS in camera-ready (PDF) format, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/mmr03.pdf

To obtain a Spanish-language copy of it in camera-ready (PDF) format, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/spmmr.pdf

To obtain a Turkish-language copy of it in camera-ready (PDF) format, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vis/tu_mmr03.pdf

For information about the use of VISs, as well as VISs for additional vaccines (some in up to 28 languages), visit IAC's website at: http://www.immunize.org/vis
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February 10, 2003
NEW! CD-ROM ON SMALLPOX VACCINATION TECHNIQUES NOW AVAILABLE

California Distance Learning Health Network (CDLHN) announced a new CD-ROM, "Smallpox Vaccination Techniques: The Comprehensive Guide to Screening, Inoculation, and Post-Care." Described as self-directed and interactive, the program can be used alone or can supplement and reinforce formal classroom training.

Intended for nurses, inoculation practitioners, technicians, and health care managers, the CD-ROM teaches the following:

  • The characteristics of smallpox
  • How to screen potential vaccinees
  • How to administer smallpox vaccine
  • Common reactions following vaccination
  • How to care for the vaccination site

The California Department of Health Services Immunization Branch and Emergency Preparedness Office sponsored the program. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided its content.

To order a copy of the $20 CD-ROM, contact CDLHN at cdlhn@projects.sdsu.edu, call (619) 594-5933, fax (619) 594-2111, or visit http://www.cdlhn.com/default.cfm
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February 10, 2003
OPEN MEETING OF IOM COMMITTEE ON SMALLPOX VACCINATION PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION SET FOR FEBRUARY 13 IN WASHINGTON, DC

The Committee on Smallpox Vaccination Program Implementation of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) will hold an open meeting February 13 from 9 am to 5:45 pm. Representatives from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of Defense will make presentations on various components of the vaccination program.

Space is limited, and registration is required. To access the draft agenda and registration information from the IOM website, go to: www.iom.edu/smallpox

The meeting will also be webcast in real time the day of the meeting. Details on how to participate will be available at www.iom.edu/smallpox closer to the meeting date.

For additional information, email smallpox@nas.edu or call Amber Close at (202) 334-1707.
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February 10, 2003
CDC ESTABLISHES SMALLPOX VACCINE ADVERSE EVENTS MONITORING SYSTEM

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published a Notice to Readers, "Smallpox Vaccine Adverse Events Monitoring and Response System for the First Stage of the Smallpox Vaccination Program" in the February 7 issue of the "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" (MMWR).

A summary made available to the press is reprinted below in its entirety.

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CDC and the State Health Departments have established a system for the monitoring and responding to adverse events following smallpox vaccination.

Information from this system will be communicated on a regular basis to vaccine safety oversight groups, to public health and medical communities, and to the media. This system will be used to: 1) monitor the occurrence of known events after vaccination, and identify potential new unexpected adverse events; 2) monitor the effectiveness of screening for contraindications to vaccination; 3) identify the potential need for new contraindications to vaccination; and 4) coordinate the distribution of VIG and cidofovir, if these are needed for treatment of patients with certain severe adverse events

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To obtain the complete text of the article online, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5205a5.htm

To obtain a camera-ready (PDF format) copy of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5205.pdf

HOW TO OBTAIN A FREE ELECTRONIC SUBSCRIPTION TO THE MMWR:
To obtain a free electronic subscription to the "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" (MMWR), visit CDC's MMWR website at: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr Select "Free Subscription" from the menu at the left of the screen. Once you have submitted the required information, weekly issues of the MMWR and all new ACIP statements (published as MMWR's "Recommendations and Reports") will arrive automatically by email.
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February 10, 2003
CDC'S AFIX STRATEGY HELPS PROVIDERS RAISE IMMUNIZATION COVERAGE LEVELS

Described as a "continuous quality improvement strategy," AFIX is promoted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as a way to help providers bring immunization levels up to national goals. State and local health department staff or contracted organizations offer AFIX to public and private healthcare providers, using funds primarily awarded by CDC. There is no charge to participating providers.

AFIX has four components:

  1. Assessment of randomly selected medical charts, using provided software to evaluate the coverage level of individual vaccines and combination series
     
  2. Feedback sessions conducted by the state or local health department to give the provider the assessment information and devise strategies to increase coverage levels
     
  3. Incentive programs that recognize immunization providers who have significantly improved their coverage levels
     
  4. Exchange of ideas and information among providers to improve provider performance and develop best practices

Results of using the strategy are impressive. The Indiana Immunization Program, winner of the 2002 AFIX Award, saw the overall coverage level for the 4:3:1 series in assessed provider offices climb from 53.6% in 1999 to 74.9% in 2001. Similar increases were shown in the 4:3:1:3:3 series, which rose from 49.4% in 1999 to 71.6% in 2001.

For detailed information about AFIX from the website of the National Immunization Program, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/afix

To speak with someone about AFIX, call Amy Kirsch or Nancy Fenlon at (404) 639-8222 or email afix@cdc.gov
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February 10, 2003
CDC RELEASES GUIDELINES ON LABORATORY TESTING AND RESULT REPORTING OF ANTIBODY TO HEPATITIS C VIRUS

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published "Guidelines for Laboratory Testing and Result Reporting of Antibody to Hepatitis C Virus" in the February 7 issue of the "MMWR Recommendations and Reports" (MMWR).

The Division of Viral Hepatitis of the National Center for Infectious Diseases prepared the guidelines. Parts of the summary are reprinted below.

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Testing for the presence of antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) is recommended for initially identifying persons with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. . . .

These guidelines expand recommendations for anti-HCV testing to include an option for reflex supplemental testing based on screening-test--positive signal-to-cut--off (s/co) ratios. . . .These guidelines were developed on the basis of available knowledge of CDC staff in consultation with representatives from the Food and Drug Administration and public health, hospital, and independent  laboratories. Adoption of these guidelines by all public and private laboratories that perform in vitro diagnostic anti-HCV testing will improve the accuracy and utility of reported anti-HCV test results for counseling and medical evaluation of patients by health-care professionals and for surveillance by public health departments.

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To obtain the complete text of the guidelines online, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5203a1.htm

To obtain a camera-ready (PDF format) copy of the guidelines, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/rr/rr5203.pdf

The PDF version includes a free CDC-sponsored continuing education activity that can be completed online or submitted via U.S. mail for CME, CDU, or CNE credit. Simply read the MMWR report, answer the questions at the end of the report, and follow instructions for submitting your answers.
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February 10, 2003
CDC COMPARES HIV/STD RISK DIFFERENCES FOR MEN WHO HAVE SEX WITH MEN AND DISCLOSE THEIR SEXUAL ORIENTATION AND THOSE WHO DO NOT DISCLOSE

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published "HIV/STD Risks in Young Men Who Have Sex with Men Who Do Not Disclose Their Sexual Orientation--Six U.S. Cities, 1994-2002" in the February 7 issue of the "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" (MMWR).

To better understand the prevention needs of young men who have sex with men (MSM), CDC analyzed data from the Young Men's Survey (YMS) to compare HIV/STD risk differences between MSM who disclose their sexual orientation and those who do not. (Conducted during 1994-2000, YMS  surveyed men aged 15-29 years who attended MSM-identified venues in six U.S. cities.) A summary made available to the press recaps the CDC's analysis; it is reprinted below in its entirety.

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CDC study finds high prevalence of HIV among African American men who have sex with men, but do not disclose their sexual orientation.

African American men who have sex with men (MSM), but who do not disclose their sexual orientation (nondisclosers), have a high prevalence of HIV infection (14%); nearly three times higher than nondisclosing MSMs of all other races/ethnicities combined (5%). Confirming previous research, the study of 5,589 MSM, aged 15-29 years, in six U.S. cities found that African American MSM were more likely not to disclose their sexual orientation compared with white MSM (18% vs. 8%). HIV-infected nondisclosers were less likely to know their HIV status (98% were unaware of their infection compared with 75% of HIV-positive disclosers), and more likely to have had recent female sex partners. These findings underscore the need for expanded HIV/STD testing and prevention services for nondisclosing MSM, particularly African Americans, and their male and female sex partners.

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To obtain the complete text of the article online, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5205a2.htm

To obtain a camera-ready (PDF format) copy of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5205.pdf
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February 10, 2003
READER ALERT! FEBRUARY 19 IS DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS FOR THE NATIONAL HIV PREVENTION CONFERENCE

The conference organizers for the 2003 National HIV Prevention Conference have extended the abstract deadline to February 19. To submit an abstract, go to: http://www.2003hivprevconf.org/abstracts.asp

The conference will be held July 27-30 in Atlanta. The registration deadline is June 16. For information on the conference program, registration, exhibiting, and accommodations, go to: http://www.2003hivprevconf.org

For additional information on submitting an abstract or on the conference in general, call (866) 277-6313 or email info@2003HIVPrevConf.org
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February 10, 2003
NEW EDITION! COMPREHENSIVE BOOK ON INFECTION CONTROL IN CHILD CARE AND PRESCHOOL SETTINGS IS UPDATED

If you're involved in health care in daycare or preschool settings, you will find the sixth edition of "Infection Control in the Child Care Center and Preschool" a useful addition to your professional library. Compiled from contributions from 40 noted experts, the book is edited by Leigh B. Grossman, MD, Professor of Pediatrics and Chief of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at the University of Virginia Health System.

The book's first three sections explain how infections are spread and present up-to-date guidelines on enrollment requirements, staff education, employee health, care of high-risk children, and investigation and management of outbreaks. The fourth and concluding section comprises 55 chapters on specific pathogens.

Published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, the book retails for $44.95. To order online from the publisher, go to: http://www.lww.com/products/?501521200

To order by phone, call (800) 638-3030 or by fax, dial (301) 223-2400.
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February 10, 2003
FREE! GET YOUR "IMMUNIZATION . . . NOT JUST KIDS' STUFF" POSTERS WHILE THEY LAST

The Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) is giving away the adult immunization poster "Immunization . . . Not Just Kids' Stuff." IAC gratefully acknowledges the New York State Department of Health for giving us the artwork to print the poster a few years ago.

If you are involved in adult immunization, hang a poster in your waiting room, hallways, and exam rooms to raise awareness about the importance of adult immunization. The 7" x 14" two-color (peach and purple) poster is mailed folded in half (7" x 7").

Supplies are limited (750 left), so please make your request as soon as possible in quantities from 1 to 20. Orders for free posters come in quickly and are filled on a first-come, first-served basis. To view an enlarged image of the poster online, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/adultposter/posterview.htm

Request the poster online at http://www.immunize.org/adultposter

When you order, you will be asked to specify the following:

  1. The number of posters you want (limit is 20); shipped only to U.S. addresses
  2. How you plan to use the posters
  3. Your name and complete contact information

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February 10, 2003
NEW! EUROPEAN VACINE MANUFACTURERS ANNOUNCE WEBSITE LAUNCH

The European Vaccine Manufacturers (EVM), a group within the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations, has launched a website at http://www.evm-vaccines.org

In a press release issued February 3, EVM said the website aims to articulate European vaccine manufacturers' positions on various European Union issues affecting the European vaccine industry. It also provides a wide range of information about vaccination as a crucial tool in combating the worldwide problem of communicable diseases.

For additional information, email Diana Steimle of EVM at dianasteimle@efpia.org or info@evm-vaccines.org

 

Immunization Action Coalition1573 Selby AvenueSt. Paul MN 55104
E-mail: admin@immunize.org Web: http://www.immunize.org/
Tel: (651) 647-9009Fax: (651) 647-9131

This page was updated on February 10, 2003