Immunization Action Coalition and the Hepatitis B Coalition

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Issue Number 173            June 30, 2000

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE

  1. CDC releases recommendations for prevention and control of meningococcal disease and meningococcal disease in college students
  2. CDC publishes report on measles incidence in the United States, 1999
  3. Live satellite broadcast from next week's National Immunization Conference! CDC presents "Adult Immunization Issues"
  4. CDC publishes report on polio eradication in the South-East Asia Region
  5. Special satellite broadcast has been added to the schedule for CDC's Influenza Pandemic satellite broadcast set for July 13

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(1)
June 30, 2000
CDC RELEASES RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE AND MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE IN COLLEGE STUDENTS

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published a new issue of "MMWR Recommendations and Reports" on June 30, 2000, that contains two related documents: "Prevention and Control of Meningococcal Disease" and "Meningococcal Disease and College Students." These reports summarize and update an earlier published statement of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) concerning the control and prevention of meningococcal disease (MMWR 1997:46[No. RR-5]:1B21). 

Portions of the ACIP statement are reprinted below.

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1. PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE

This report's Introduction states in part: "Each year, 2,400-3,000 cases of meningococcal disease occur in the United States, resulting in a rate of 0.8-1.3 per 100,000 population. The case-fatality ratio for meningococcal disease is 10%, despite the continued sensitivity of meningococcus to many antibiotics, including penicillin. Meningococcal disease also causes substantial morbidity: 11%-19% of survivors have sequelae (e.g., neurologic disability, limb loss, and hearing loss). During 1991-1998, the highest rate of meningococcal disease occurred among infants aged <1 year; however, the rate for persons aged 18-23 years was also higher than that for the general population (1.4 per 100,000)."

This report concludes in part:

"The quadrivalent polysaccharide meningococcal vaccine (which protects against serogroups A, C, Y, and W-135) is recommended for control of serogroup C meningococcal disease outbreaks and for use among persons in certain high-risk groups. Travelers to countries in which disease is hyperendemic or epidemic may benefit from vaccination. In addition, college freshmen, especially those who live in dormitories, should be educated about meningococcal disease and the vaccine so that they can make an educated decision about vaccination.

"Conjugate C meningococcal vaccines were recently introduced into routine childhood immunization schedules in the United Kingdom. These vaccines should be available in the United States within 2-4 years, offering a better tool for control and prevention of meningococcal disease."

The report also states that "current Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) guidelines suggest that routine vaccination of civilians with the quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine is not recommended because of its relative ineffectiveness in children aged <2 years (the age group with the highest risk for sporadic disease) and because of its relatively short duration of protection.

To obtain the full text version (HTML format) of "Prevention and Control of Meningococcal Disease," go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr4907a1.htm


2. MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE AND COLLEGE STUDENTS

This second report focuses specifically on recommendations for college students "regarding the modestly increased risk for meningococcal disease among college freshmen, particularly those who live in dormitories or residence halls."

According to this MMWR report, "the risk for meningococcal disease among college students is low; therefore, vaccination of all college students, all freshmen, or only freshmen who live in dormitories or residence halls is not likely to be cost-effective for society as a whole. Thus ACIP is issuing the following recommendations regarding the use of meningococcal polysaccharide vaccines for college students.

  • Providers of medical care to incoming and current college freshmen, particularly those who plan to or already live in dormitories and residence halls, should, during routine medical care, inform these students and their parents about meningococcal disease and the benefits of vaccination. ACIP does not recommend that the level of increased risk among freshmen warrants any specific changes in living situations for freshmen.
         
  • College freshmen who want to reduce their risk for meningococcal disease should either be administered vaccine (by a doctor's office or student health service) or directed to a site where vaccine is available.
       
  • The risk for meningococcal disease among non-freshmen college students is similar to that for the general population. However, the vaccine is safe and efficacious and therefore can be provided to non-freshmen undergraduates who want to reduce their risk for meningococcal disease.
        
  • Colleges should inform incoming and/or current freshmen, particularly those who plan to live or already live in dormitories or residence halls, about meningococcal disease and the availability of a safe and effective vaccine.
       
  • Public health agencies should provide colleges and health-care providers with information about meningococcal disease and the vaccine as well as information regarding how to obtain vaccine."

To obtain the full text version (HTML format) of "Meningococcal Disease and College Students," go to: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr4907a2.htm

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To view or download the complete camera-ready version of this issue of "MMWR Recommendations and Reports" (a PDF document that contains both reports), go to: ftp://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Publications/mmwr/rr/rr4907.pdf

For information on how to obtain a free electronic subscription to the MMWR, see the instructions that follow article four below.
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(2)
June 30, 2000
CDC PUBLISHES REPORT ON MEASLES INCIDENCE IN THE UNITED STATES, 1999

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published an article titled "Measles--United States, 1999" in the June 30, 2000, issue of the MMWR.

The Editorial Note of this MMWR article states in part: "The findings in this report document a continuing trend of record low numbers of measles cases and a high percentage of imported cases, suggesting that measles is not endemic in the United States. In 1999, as in the previous 2 years, few measles cases of unknown source were reported and these cases did not cluster temporally or geographically in patterns that would suggest a chain of endemic transmission. Virologic data indicated that only imported virus strains were transmitted in the United States in 1999.

...However, because endemic measles could be reestablished if vaccination coverage declines, efforts should continue to ensure that coverage remains high and that surveillance is strong. In addition, because of the continued threat of imported measles, the experts encouraged strengthened support for global measles control and eradication of measles."

To obtain the full text version (HTML format) of this MMWR article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/epo/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm4925a1.htm

For information on how to obtain a free electronic subscription to the MMWR, see the instructions that follow article four below.
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(3)
June 30, 2000
LIVE SATELLITE BROADCAST FROM NEXT WEEK'S NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION CONFERENCE! CDC PRESENTS "ADULT IMMUNIZATION ISSUES"

On Saturday, July 8, from 9:00 to 11:30am ET, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will present a live satellite broadcast of two sessions from the 34th National Immunization Conference in Washington, DC. Both the "Adult Immunization Issues" plenary session and the closing plenary session will be broadcast nationwide.

Topics addressed in the "Adult Immunization Issues" portion of this satellite broadcast will include:

  • influenza disease and vaccine
  • pneumococcal disease and vaccine
  • how to prepare for pandemic influenza outbreaks
  • an overview of immunization attitudes and practices in
    hospitals
  • the use of standing orders protocols to increase
    immunization

For more information on registration and the technical specifications for the broadcast, go to CDC's website at: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/NIC/satellite.htm  (link discontinued) or contact your state or county immunization program. A list of state immunization coordinators is available on the website of CDC's National Immunization Program at: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/ed/coordinators.htm

You will also be able to view this event via the Internet. The broadcast will be presented live on the website of the National Institutes of Health at: http://videocast.nih.gov

For a detailed list of additional upcoming immunization and hepatitis conferences and events, visit IAC's "Calendar of Events" at: http://www.immunize.org/calendar/
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(4)
June 30, 2000
CDC PUBLISHES REPORT ON POLIO ERADICATION IN THE SOUTH-EAST ASIA REGION

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published an article titled "Progress Toward Poliomyelitis Eradication--South-East Asia Region, 1998-1999" in the June 30, 2000, issue of the MMWR. This report details work in this region, especially in India (population: 1 billion), whose population accounts for 40% of confirmed polio cases and 60% of wild poliovirus isolates worldwide.

According to this MMWR report, if planned National Immunization Days (NIDs) and mopping up activities are successful in Bangladesh, India, and Nepal, poliovirus transmission could be interrupted in these countries by the end of 2000 or soon after.

To obtain the full text version (HTML format) of this MMWR article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/epo/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm4925a4.htm


HOW TO OBTAIN A FREE ELECTRONIC SUBSCRIPTION TO THE MMWR:
To obtain a free electronic subscription to the "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" (MMWR), visit CDC's MMWR website at: http://www2.cdc.gov/mmwr
Select "Free MMWR Subscription" from the menu at the left of the screen. Once you have submitted the required information, weekly issues of the MMWR and all new ACIP statements (published as MMWR's "Recommendations and Reports") will arrive automatically by e-mail.
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(5)
June 30, 2000
SPECIAL SATELLITE BROADCAST HAS BEEN ADDED TO THE SCHEDULE FOR CDC'S INFLUENZA PANDEMIC SATELLITE BROADCAST SET FOR JULY 13

A special satellite broadcast titled "Special Session for Public Health Workers about Influenza Control" has been scheduled for July 13. This new session will air between two previously scheduled pandemic influenza broadcasts presented by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

This new special session is set for 11:30-12:30am ET and will address influenza surveillance, as well as new recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for influenza vaccination. According to a CDC flyer for the special session that has just recently been added, "a number of issues have arisen regarding influenza control for the upcoming season. Accordingly CDC has scheduled a national special session during which CDC immunization and influenza experts will be available to discuss these issues."

Presenters of the special session include:

  • William L. Atkinson, MD, MPH, Medical Epidemiologist, Training and Education Branch, Immunization Services Division (ISD), National Immunization Program (NIP), CDC;
       
  • Keiji Fukuda, MD, MPH, Chief, Epidemiology Section, Influenza Branch, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, CDC; and,
        
  • Dean D. Mason, Chief, Program Support Branch, ISD, NIP, CDC.

The regular satellite broadcast session is titled "The next influenza pandemic: Not if, but when" and is offered by CDC as part of the annual "Preparing for the Next Influenza Pandemic" campaign.

Continuing Education Credit will not be offered for the recently scheduled special session.

For more information on this course, visit the website of CDC's Public Health Training Network at: http://www.cdc.gov/phtn/pandemic/pandemicflu.htm

A guidebook titled "Pandemic Influenza: A Planning Guide for State and Local Officials (Draft 2.1)" will be the text for the regularly scheduled course. To download this document online, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/od/nvpo/pandemicflu.htm

To register or to receive information about course materials, contact your State Immunization Coordinator. For a list of State Immunization Coordinators and their phone numbers, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/ed/coordinators.htm

Any additional questions about this broadcast? Contact Craig Wilkins at (404)639-8799 or cwilkins@cdc.gov

For a detailed list of additional upcoming immunization and hepatitis conferences and events, visit IAC's "Calendar of Events" at: http://www.immunize.org/calendar/

 

Immunization Action Coalition1573 Selby AvenueSt. Paul MN 55104
E-mail: admin@immunize.org Web: http://www.immunize.org/
Tel: (651) 647-9009Fax: (651) 647-9131

This page was updated on February 15, 2002