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Issue 987
IAC Express: Weekly immunization news and information
Issue 987: April 3, 2012

TOP STORIES

FEATURED RESOURCES

JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS

EDUCATION AND TRAINING


TOP STORIES

Spotlight on immunize.org: New! "Cocooning" web section
Are you looking for information on cocooning (a strategy to prevent pertussis transmission to infants by ensuring close contacts of infants have received Tdap vaccination)? Start here! IAC’s new web section on “Cocooning” features links to a new website dedicated to pertussis prevention through cocooning from the Texas Department of State Health Services. You’ll also find other helpful resources regarding cocooning such as ACIP recommendations, handbook for providers, videos, journal articles, patient handouts, and much more.

You can access the new “Cocooning” web section from the index at the bottom of IAC’s home page called “Guide to immunize.org” or by using IAC’s search engine.

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IAC Executive Director Dr. Deborah L. Wexler urges adult vaccination in TV interview
On March 27, IAC Executive Director Deborah L. Wexler, MD, promoted adult vaccination during an interview that aired on KARE 11 TV, NBC's affiliate in Minneapolis-St. Paul.

Dr. Wexler stated that most adults are woefully behind in getting recommended vaccines. She believes that adults need to take responsibility for finding out which vaccines they need and for getting them. She encourages adults to find out more about adult vaccination from their doctors and from online resources.

For a succinct summary of which vaccines are recommended for adults, heathcare professionals and patients can access the IAC handout Vaccinations for Adults—You’re NEVER too old to get immunized!

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FDA approves extended period for administering VariZIG for postexposure prophylaxis of varicella
CDC published FDA Approval of an Extended Period for Administering VariZIG for Postexposure Prophylaxis of Varicella in the March 30 issue of MMWR (page 212). A press summary of the article is reprinted below.

In May 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved an extended period for administering VariZIG. VariZIG is a product recommended for people who do not have immunity to varicella (chickenpox), who are at high risk for severe chickenpox or complications, and who are ineligible to receive the chickenpox vaccine to protect them from getting chickenpox or to attenuate the severity of disease after being exposed to the virus that causes chickenpox. People at high risk for severe chickenpox are those with compromised immune systems, premature babies, or pregnant women. VariZIG is the only product of its kind available for use in the United States. The period after exposure to the chickenpox virus, during which a patient may receive VariZIG, is now 10 days; previously, it was 96 hours (4 days). As before, VariZIG should still be administered as soon as possible after exposure to the disease.

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FEATURED RESOURCES

CDC, IAC, ANA, and NNINA schedule three netconferences for nurses and other immunization providers
CDC, along with IAC, the American Nurses Association (ANA), and the National Network of Immunization Nurses and Associates (NNINA) have collaborated on a series of three netconferences for nurses and other immunization providers. The netconferences are structured to allow participants to view a pretaped webcast several days before joining the live call-in seminar. Attendance at the live sessions is limited to the first 1,000 people who dial in.

Following are the webinar topics and schedule:
  • Talking with Patients about Vaccines: Pretaped webcast available after March 21 (click here to download webcast [69 MB]); live call-in seminar scheduled for April 4, 2 PM ET
  • Vaccination of Healthcare Personnel: Educated Decisions, Caring Choices: Pretaped webcast available after April 11; live call-in seminar scheduled for April 25, 2 PM ET
  • Reducing Vaccination Errors: Pretaped webcast available after April 18; live call-in seminar scheduled for May 2, 2 PM ET
Related Links:
  • Find an overview of the three sessions and information about how they may be viewed on the IAC website.
  • Find a Discussion Guide for the first session, Talking with Patients about Vaccines, on the IAC website.
  • Additional information about each session is available on the CDC website.
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JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS

CDC publishes summary of 2008 surveillance of prevalence of autism spectrum disorders
On March 30, CDC published a surveillance summary titled Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders—Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network, 14 Sites, United States, 2008. The conclusion is reprinted below.

Conclusion
Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) continue to be an important public health concern. The findings provided in this report confirm that prevalence estimates of ASD continue to increase in the majority of Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network communities, and ongoing public health surveillance is needed to quantify and understand these changes over time. Further work is needed to evaluate multiple factors affecting ASD prevalence over time. ADDM Network investigators continue to explore these factors in multiple ways, with a focus on understanding disparities in the identification of ASDs among certain subgroups and evaluating temporal changes in the prevalence of ASDs. CDC also is engaged with other federal, state, and private partners in a coordinated response to identify risk factors for ASDs and meet the needs of persons with ASDs and their families. Additional information is available at http://www.cdc.gov/autism.


Related Link
CDC's press release: CDC estimates 1 in 88 children in United States has been identified as having an autism spectrum disorder: CDC data help communities better serve these children

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EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Epidemiology & Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases course planned for May 9–10 in Fredericksburg, VA
Presented by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, this live two-day course provides a comprehensive review of immunizations, and vaccine-preventable diseases and their respective vaccines. Physicians, nurses, pharmacists, medical assistants, students, and other health professionals will learn the most up-to-date immunization information from ACIP. Continuing education credits are available.

For more information or to register, visit Pink Book Course.

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About IAC Express 
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.
If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.
IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. U38IP000589 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: Baxter Healthcare Corp.; CSL Biotherapies; GlaxoSmithKline; MedImmune, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Novartis Vaccines; Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, Inc.; Pfizer, Inc.; and sanofi pasteur.
IAC Express Disclaimer
ISSN: 1526-1786

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Video: It's Autism Awareness Month
It's Autism Awareness Month: Update on the latest research in this video from the Autism Science Foundation (ASF): Fred R. Volkmar, M.D. is Irving B. Harris Professor of child psychiatry, pediatrics, and psychology and Director of the Yale University Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine. He is also the chief of child psychiatry at Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT. Dr. Volkmar's research focus is on mechanisms and treatment of autism and related disorders in individuals of all ages.
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Issue Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
Publication Staff
Editor: Deborah L. Wexler, MD
Managing Editor: Dale Thompson, MA
Associate Editor: Teresa Anderson, DDS, MPH
Editorial Assistant: Janelle Tangonan Anderson
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This page was reviewed on March 27, 2012
 
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.