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Issue 972
IAC Express: Weekly immunization news and information
Issue 972: January 10, 2012

TOP STORIES

OFFICIAL RELEASES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

FEATURED RESOURCES

JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS

CONFERENCES AND MEETINGS



TOP STORIES

Spotlight on immunize.org: HPV-related videos
January is Cervical Health Awareness Month! An important tie-in to this health observance for immunization providers is the importance of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination to prevent cervical cancer. To commemorate this health observance, IAC is featuring a collection of videos about HPV and HPV vaccination. The HPV-related videos include personal testimonies from women affected by HPV and cervical cancers, as well as educational information from expert commentators such as Dr. Paul Offit. The featured videos are from the following organizations: California Immunization Coalition’s Shot-by-Shot project, Vaccine Education Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, National Cervical Cancer Coalition, Women’s Cancer Network, Cervical Cancer-Free America, PKIDs, Florida Bureau of Immunization, and Immunization Action Coalition.

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Influenza can be severe for children and young adults with neurologic and neurodevelopmental conditions
CDC published Severe Influenza Among Children and Young Adults with Neurologic and Neurodevelopmental Conditions—Ohio, 2011 in the January 6 issue of MMWR (pages 1729–1733). An MMWR news synopsis of the article is reprinted below.

This study describes the findings of a joint investigation between the Ohio Department of Health and CDC into an outbreak of influenza in a residential facility for children and young adults with neurological and neurodevelopmental conditions. Among 130 residents of the facility, 76 (58 percent) developed respiratory illness in February 2011; 13 became severely ill and seven of those patients died. All 13 severely ill residents had multiple neurological and neurodevelopmental conditions, and their underlying medical conditions might have hindered early diagnosis and treatment and contributed to the severity of illness. Clinicians should be alert to possible influenza among children and young adults with neurological and neurodevelopmental conditions, especially during influenza season. Because persons with neurological and neurodevelopmental disorders are at high risk for complications from influenza, vaccination should be part of a larger program of influenza prevention that includes antiviral drugs that are given early in the course of illness, ideally within 48 hours of symptom onset.

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CDC publishes report on 2011 fatal case of imported human rabies in New Jersey
CDC published Imported Human Rabies—New Jersey, 2011
in the January 6 issue of MMWR (pages 1734–1736). An MMWR news synopsis of the article is reprinted below.

Infected bats are the most common source of fatal human rabies cases in the United States, but dogs are the most common source abroad. All animal bites should be assessed for the risk of rabies exposure. In July 2011, a woman aged 73 years, who was bitten in April 2011 by an adopted street dog in her home country of Haiti, died of rabies in New Jersey while visiting family. The woman did not seek medical care when the bite occurred as she thought it was minor and family in the United States was not informed of the bite until after diagnosis. This is the third report of human rabies in the United States acquired in Haiti since 2000 and highlights the importance of obtaining a detailed history for patients who have traveled from a rabies-endemic country and the value of consultation with medical and public health professionals regarding any animal bites.

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CDC publishes report on receipt of A(H1N1) vaccine by U.S. prisons and jails during 2009-10 influenza season
CDC published Receipt of A(H1N1)pdm09 Vaccine by Prisons and Jails—United States, 2009–10 Influenza Season
in the January 6 issue of MMWR (pages 1737–1740). An MMWR news synopsis of the article is reprinted below.

Persons dwelling in jails and prisons are at increased risk for exposure to infectious agents because new entrants can constantly introduce new pathogens, and close confinement can facilitate disease transmission. Fifty-five percent of U.S. jails (facilities that house persons awaiting trial or serving short sentences) did not receive any H1N1 vaccine in 20092010 and thus were excluded from the national vaccine campaign. Including both jail and prison inmates in emergency preparedness efforts, especially vaccination campaigns, is important for the health of communities overall. Although most jail entrants are healthy men, jail populations can include those in the highest risk categories for influenza, such as pregnant women. The median length of stay is 48 hours, but detention can extend for months. Future emergency preparedness efforts need to consider jail and prison inmates, a population not well targeted in the 2009 H1N1 vaccine campaign.

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CDC publishes update on current influenza A(H3N2)v transmission in five U.S. states
CDC published Update: Influenza A (H3N2)v Transmission and Guidelines—Five States, 2011 in the January 6 issue of MMWR (pages 1741–1744). This report was previously published as an MMWR Early Release on December 23, 2011, and was previously covered in IAC Express on December 27, 2011.

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OFFICIAL RELEASES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

WHO publishes November 2011 meeting report of the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization
On January 6, the WHO publication Weekly Epidemiological Record (WER) published Meeting of the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization, November 2011conclusions and recommendations.

The report includes the following sections: (1) report from the Department of Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals; (2) report from the GAVI Alliance; (3) reports from other advisory committees; (4) polio eradication; (5) Decade of Vaccines; (6) global vaccines safety blueprint; (7) vaccine coverage; (8) vaccine preventable disease surveillance; (9) review of serotype replacement in the setting of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) use and implications for the PCV10/PCV13 era; (10) optimizing pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV schedules); (11) new tuberculosis vaccines; and  (12) evidence and recommendations on use of hepatitis A vaccine.

For information about WER, including subscription information, click here.

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Guidelines for safe work practices in medical diagnostic laboratories include information on vaccination
On January 6, CDC published an MMWR Supplement titled Guidelines for Safe Work Practices in Human and Animal Medical Diagnostic Laboratories Recommendations of a CDC-convened, Biosafety Blue Ribbon Panel. The guidelines include occasional references to immunization that are pertinent to laboratory employees.

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Reminder: Healthcare personnel at long-term care facilities need influenza vaccination
On January 6, CDC made available a letter (dated 12/5/11) to long-term care medical directors. Signed by U.S. Assistant Secretary for Heath, Howard Koh, MD, MPH, the letter presents these reasons for vaccinating healthcare personnel (HCP) at long-term care (LTC) facilities: (1) each year influenza outbreaks occur at LTC facilities, resulting in patient hospitalizations and deaths; (2) vaccinating HCP at such facilities reduces patient mortality by 30-to-40 percent; and (3) HCP vaccination levels of 60 percent or greater can lead to significant decreases in influenza outbreaks in LTC facilities.

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FEATURED RESOURCES

Influenza vaccination is recommended for almost everyone, so please keep vaccinating
Influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone age 6 months and older, so please keep vaccinating your patients.

Following is a list of resources related to influenza disease and vaccination for healthcare professionals and the public.
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JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS

AAP News reports that two-dimensional barcodes on vaccines are ready for use in pediatric offices
In its January issue, AAP News published Two-dimensional barcodes on vaccines make their debut. The article's opening four paragraphs are reprinted below. The article also includes guidance for clinicians and information on becoming a participant in a CDC pilot project that will assess challenges and determine best practices for labeling and tracking vaccines using 2D barcodes. (Note: AAP News is a publication of the American Academy of Pediatrics.)

Two-dimensional (2D) barcoding is ready for use in pediatric offices, promising to reduce medical errors and help health care providers document vaccine information more accurately in patient records.

2D barcodes use the vertical dimension to capture product information, lot number and expiration date in a significantly smaller space than linear barcodes. The new technology is available on pediatric diphtheria and tetanus toxoids adsorbed vaccine from Sanofi Pasteur. In addition, Menactra meningococcal (groups A, C, Y, and W-135) polysaccharide diphtheria toxoid conjugate vaccine, also manufactured by Sanofi Pasteur, will have 2D barcodes early this year.

A tiered approach will be used to implement 2D barcodes on additional Sanofi Pasteur products to ensure that supply is not affected by this new printing technology and that the product is working as anticipated. The Academy anticipates other manufacturers will begin launching products with 2D barcodes this year.

Implementation of the new technology is due to the work of a collaborative group of stakeholders and the leadership of many AAP members.


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January issue of Virtual Mentor, AMA's online journal of ethics, explores vaccines and ethics
The January issue of Virtual Mentor (VM), the American
Medical Association’s journal of medical ethics online, focuses on vaccines and ethics. The issue's authors examine the ethics of mandating vaccination, managing vaccine shortages, conducting human trials for proposed vaccines, developing a vaccine that would interfere with the brain’s response to stress, and more. The issue will be live for the month of January and then archived on the VM website.

VM's editors encourage IAC Express readers to share content from the January issue with interested colleagues. Founded in 1999, VM explores the ethical issues and challenges that students, residents, and other physicians are likely to confront in their training and daily practice.

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December 2011 issue of CDC's Immunization Works newsletter now available
CDC recently released the December 2011 issue of its monthly newsletter Immunization Works and posted it on the website of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD). The newsletter offers the immunization community information about current topics. The information is in the public domain and can be reproduced and circulated widely.

CDC announced that beginning with the January 2012 issue, Immunization Works will no longer be sent to recipients' email accounts. To be notified when an issue is posted, go to the NCIRD Immunization Works newsletter web page and sign up to receive free email updates. NCIRD encourages you to share this information with your co-workers and contacts in the immunization community.

The December issue contains approximately 10 major articles, many focused on influenza, as well as information about and links to several immunization meetings, conferences, and resources.

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CONFERENCES AND MEETINGS

February 3 is the deadline for abstracts for the 1st National Immunization Conference Online
The 2012 National Immunization Conference, called the 1st National Immunization Conference Online (NICO), will be held March 26–28—entirely online. The deadline to submit abstracts is February 3. Only abstracts for poster presentations are being accepted.

Details about presentations and speakers for each session will be added to the online conference agenda as they become available, so be sure to check back often.

For more information about the 1st NICO, contact the Conference Planning Team by phone at (404) 639-8225 or by email at NIPNIC@cdc.gov.

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National Conference on Immunization and Health Coalitions set for May 2325 in New Orleans
The National Conference on Immunization and Health Coalitions will take place in New Orleans on May 23–25. The event host is the Louisiana Shots for Tots Coalition.

Details are being added to the online conference agenda, so be sure to check back often.

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About IAC Express 
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.
If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.
IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. U38IP000589 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: Baxter Healthcare Corp.; CSL Biotherapies; GlaxoSmithKline; MedImmune, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Novartis Vaccines; Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, Inc.; Pfizer, Inc.; and sanofi pasteur.
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New HPV-related Website and Videos from VEC
New HPV-related Website and Videos from VEC: The Vaccine Education Center (VEC) at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia features a video of Dr. Offit, as well as videos of families discussing their decision to get the HPV vaccine. You will find links to additional information, questions and answers, and opportunities to
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Issue Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
Publication Staff
Editor: Deborah L. Wexler, MD
Managing Editor: Dale Thompson, MA
Associate Editor: Teresa Anderson, DDS, MPH
Editorial Assistant: Janelle Tangonan Anderson
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This page was reviewed on January 10, 2012
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.