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Issue 1036
IAC Express: Weekly immunization news and information
Issue 1036: January 22, 2013

TOP STORIES

IAC HANDOUTS

OFFICIAL RELEASES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

FEATURED RESOURCES

JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS

EDUCATION AND TRAINING



TOP STORIES

Institute of Medicine publishes report on the childhood immunization schedule and safety
The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recently published a report titled The Childhood Immunization Schedule and Safety: Stakeholder Concerns, Scientific Evidence, and Future Studies. The conclusion contained in a summation of the report is reprinted below.

Since the late 1970s, IOM committees have conducted more than 60 studies of vaccine safety, attesting to society’s sustained interest in safely vaccinating populations from preventable disease. This committee’s report is unique in that it is the first to attempt to examine the entire childhood
immunization schedule as it exists today.

In this most comprehensive examination of the immunization schedule to date, the IOM committee uncovered no evidence of major safety concerns associated with adherence to the childhood immunization schedule, which should help to reassure a diverse group of stakeholders. Indeed, rather than exposing children to harm, following the complete childhood immunization schedule is strongly associated with reducing vaccine-preventable diseases.

As scientific advances continue and new vaccines are developed, the childhood immunization schedule may grow even more complex. Looking to the future, the IOM supports HHS’s efforts to ensure that stakeholders are more fully involved in addressing benefits and concerns regarding the
safety of the childhood immunization schedule.


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CDC holds press telebriefing on the 2012–13 influenza season and posts the FluView Update and new resources for clinicians
On January 18, CDC held a media telebriefing titled Flu Season and Vaccine Effectiveness. The presenters were CDC Director Thomas Frieden, MD, MPH, and FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg, MD.

Weekly FluView for week ending January 12
Reprinted below is the Key Flu Indicators section of CDC's Summary of Weekly FluView for the week ending January 12.

According to the latest FluView report, influenza activity remains high and widespread across the nation. While activity indicators that rose early—like influenza-like-illness and the percent of respiratory specimens testing positive for influenza— are beginning to show declines, indicators that reflect severity are now rising. It’s typical for severity indicators to lag a few weeks behind early activity indicators. This week, a high proportion of influenza-associated hospitalizations and deaths are occurring in people 65 and older. Seasons when H3N2 viruses are predominant tend to be associated with greater severity in terms of more hospitalizations and deaths.

The complete 13-page FluView Update for the week ending January 12 is available in HTML and PDF formats.

Resources for clinicians

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Clinicians: The Influenza Vaccine Availability Tracking System (IVATS) can help you find influenza vaccine
Several weeks ago, the National Influenza Vaccine Summit re-opened the Influenza Vaccine Availability Tracking System (IVATS). A resource for healthcare settings looking to purchase influenza vaccine, IVATS contains information from approved, enrolled, and participating wholesale vaccine distributors or manufacturers of U.S. licensed influenza vaccine. Information was posted to the IVATS chart the week of January 21. Ongoing updates are being made and will continue to be throughout the 2012–2013 influenza vaccination season. Keep checking back.

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CDC issues health advisory for clinicians on recommendations for influenza antiviral medications
On January 15, the CDC Health Alert Network issued a CDC Health Advisory titled Notice to Clinicians: Summary of CDC Recommendations for Influenza Antiviral Medications. The document describes the CDC recommendations for influenza antiviral medications for the 2012-2013 influenza season.

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CDC publishes early estimates of effectiveness of 2012–13 influenza vaccine
CDC published Early Estimates of Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness—United States, January 2013 in the January 18 issue of MMWR (pages 32–35). This report was previously published as an MMWR Early Release on January 11, and was previously covered in IAC Express on January 15.

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American College of Physicians approves policy recommending immunization for all healthcare providers
On January 14, the American College of Physicians issued a press release titled American College of Physicians calls for immunizations for all health care providers. Portions of the press release are reprinted below.

The American College of Physicians (ACP) has approved a policy recommendation that all health care providers (HCPs) be immunized against influenza; diphtheria; hepatitis B; measles, mumps, and rubella; pertussis (whooping cough); and varicella (chickenpox) according to the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) Adult Immunization Schedule. ACP’s policy exempts HCPs for medical reasons or a religious objection to immunization.

“These transmissible infectious diseases represent a threat to health care providers and the patients we serve, who are often highly vulnerable to infection,” said David L. Bronson, MD, FACP, president, ACP. “Proper immunization safely and effectively prevents a significant number of infections, hospitalizations, and deaths among patients as well as preventing workplace disruption and medical errors by absent workers due to illness.”


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IAC Spotlight! Reminder to consider using IAC’s newest educational materials for patients and staff
To help healthcare professionals carry out their immunization activities, IAC wants to remind you that in the past year we have created several new educational materials for patients and staff. Please review them to see if they might be of help to you in your work setting.
  1. Vaccinations for Infants and Children, Age 0–10 Years
  2. Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes
  3. Pneumococcal Vaccination Recommendations for Children and Adults by Age and/or Risk Factor
  4. Cocooning Protects Babies
  5. Influenza Vaccination of People with a History of Egg Allergy
  6. Meningococcal Vaccination Recommendations by Age and/or Risk Factor
  7. Current Dates of Vaccine Information Statements (VISs)
  8. Tips for Locating Old Immunization Records
  9. Decision to Not Vaccinate My Child
  10. How to Administer Intramuscular, Intradermal, and Intranasal Influenza Vaccines
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FDA approves a seasonal influenza vaccine that's made using a novel manufacturing technology
On January 16, FDA issued a press release titled FDA approves new seasonal influenza vaccine made using novel technology. Portions of the press release are reprinted below.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced that it has approved Flublok, the first trivalent influenza vaccine made using an insect virus (baculovirus) expression system and recombinant DNA technology. Flublok is approved for the prevention of seasonal influenza in people 18 through 49 years of age.

Unlike current flu vaccines, Flublok does not use the influenza virus or eggs in its production. Flublok’s novel manufacturing technology allows for production of large quantities of the influenza virus protein, hemagglutinin (HA)—the active ingredient in all inactivated influenza vaccines that is essential for entry of the virus into cells in the body. The majority of antibodies that prevent influenza virus infection are directed against HA. While the technology is new to flu vaccine production, it is used to make vaccines that have been approved by the FDA to prevent other infectious diseases.

“This approval represents a technological advance in the manufacturing of an influenza vaccine,” said Karen Midthun, M.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. “The new technology offers the potential for faster start-up of the vaccine manufacturing process in the event of a pandemic, because it is not dependent on an egg supply or on availability of the influenza virus.”


Flublok is manufactured by Protein Sciences Corp, of Meriden, CT.

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IAC HANDOUTS

IAC updates and redesigns its adult screening questionnaire "Do I Need Any Vaccinations Today?"
IAC revised every section of its comprehensive adult screening questionnaire Do I Need Any Vaccinations Today? In addition, IAC redesigned the questionnaire and expanded it from two pages to three.

IAC's Handouts for Patients & Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public more than 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely.

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OFFICIAL RELEASES AND ANNOUNCEMENTS

CDC seeks a director for the National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB
CDC recently announced it is actively seeking  a director for its National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP). CDC welcomes you to apply for the position or to pass this information along to help recruit candidates. Get information about NCHHSTP  and CDC on the NCHHSTP web section.

Applications are due before midnight ET on February 25. Online applications for the position vary, depending on type of eligible candidacy. To access the correct application, or for more information, contact Vicki Hunter at vhunter@cdc.gov or 404/808-8321.

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FEATURED RESOURCES

Influenza is spreading and serious, and vaccination is recommended for nearly everyone, so please keep vaccinating your patients
Influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone age 6 months and older, so please continue to vaccinate your patients. If you don't provide influenza vaccination in your clinic, please recommend vaccination to your patients and refer them to the HealthMap Vaccine Finder to locate sites near their workplace or home that offer influenza vaccination services.

If you are seeking influenza vaccine for your clinic, check the Influenza Vaccine Availability Tracking System (IVATS), which is a resource for healthcare settings looking to purchase influenza vaccine. It contains information from approved, enrolled, and participating wholesale vaccine distributors or manufacturers of U.S. licensed influenza vaccine. Information was updated as recently as the week of January 21 and will be updated on an ongoing basis.

Following is a list of resources related to influenza disease and vaccination for healthcare professionals and the public.

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AAP announces its Pediatric Resident Video Challenge; submissions are due February 25
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recently posted information about its Pediatric Resident Video Challenge.  Pediatric residents—working alone or in teams—are asked to create short videos that answer specific questions of parents regarding immunization of adolescents.  Here are two example questions:  "Why should my son receive HPV vaccine?" and "Why should my child receive HPV vaccine at age 11–12 years instead of later?"

The goal of the challenge is to develop compelling videos that will increase awareness of adolescent immunizations and to motivate and inspire others to learn more about them. All videos are due by February 25, 2013, at 11:59 p.m. CT.  Additional information is available on the AAP website.

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JOURNAL ARTICLES AND NEWSLETTERS

CDC publishes report on the global control and elimination of measles during 2000–2011
CDC published Global Control and Regional Elimination of Measles, 2000–2011 in the January 18 issue of MMWR (pages 27–31). A press summary of the article is reprinted below.

In 2010, the World Health Assembly established three milestones towards the future eradication of measles to be achieved by 2015: (1) increase routine coverage with the first dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV1) for children aged 1 year to ≥90 percent nationally and ≥80 percent in every district or equivalent administrative unit; (2) reduce and maintain annual measles incidence to <5 cases per million; and (3) reduce measles mortality by >95 percent from the 2000 estimate. During 2000–2011, global MCV1 coverage increased from 72 percent to 84 percent and the number of countries providing a second dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV2) through routine services increased from 97 (50 percent) in 2000 to 141 (73 percent) in 2011. During 2000–2011, annual measles incidence decreased 65 percent from 146 to 52 cases per million population and estimated measles deaths decreased 71 percent from 542,000 to 158,000. During 2010–2011, global measles incidence increased and large outbreaks of measles were reported in multiple countries. To resume progress toward achieving regional measles elimination targets, national governments and partners are urged to ensure that measles elimination efforts receive high priority and adequate resources.

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EDUCATION AND TRAINING

CDC NetConference "Seasonal Influenza Special Event" scheduled for January 24
CDC will present a Current Issues in Immunization NetConference on January 24 from 11 a.m. to noon, ET. Erin D. Kennedy, DVM, MPH, will speak on vaccine supply and coverage during the 2012–13 influenza season. A second presenter and topic will be announced; IAC Express will notify readers when it is. Andrew Kroger, MD, MPH, will moderate the conference.

This is a limited registration event. Registration, which is required, will close on January 24 or when the course is full.

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About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.
If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.
IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. U38IP000589 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: CSL Biotherapies; GlaxoSmithKline; MedImmune, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Novartis Vaccines; Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, Inc.; Pfizer, Inc.; and sanofi pasteur.
IAC Express Disclaimer
ISSN: 1526-1786

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Issue Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
Publication Staff
Editor: Deborah L. Wexler, MD
Managing Editor: Dale Thompson, MA
Associate Editor: Teresa Anderson, DDS, MPH
Editorial Assistant: Janelle Tangonan Anderson
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This page was reviewed on January 27, 2014
 
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.