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Issue 1034
IAC Express: Weekly immunization news and information
Issue 1034: January 8, 2013

TOP STORIES

IAC HANDOUTS

FEATURED RESOURCES



TOP STORIES

January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month
CDC published Announcement: Cervical Cancer Awareness Month—January 2013 in the January 4 issue of MMWR (page 1049). Portions of the article are reprinted below.

January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month. Cervical cancer is highly preventable because screening tests for cervical cancer and vaccines to prevent human papillomavirus (HPV), which is the main cause of cervical cancer, are available. However, half of cervical cancers occur among women rarely or never screened for cancer, and another 10%–20% of cancers occur among women who were screened but did not receive adequate follow-up care. When cervical cancer is found early, it is highly treatable and associated with long survival and good quality of life. . . .

To help prevent cervical cancer, vaccines are available to prevent HPV infection. HPV vaccines offer the greatest health benefit to persons who receive all 3 doses before exposure to HPV through sexual activity. Routine HPV vaccination is recommended for girls and boys at age 11 or 12 years. Vaccination also is recommended for females through age 26 years and for males through age 21 years who have not been vaccinated previously. Any man who has sex with other men, and men with compromised immune systems (including human immunodeficiency virus infection), also may be vaccinated through age 26 years.

Information about HPV vaccines is available. Additional information about CDC programs that promote early detection and treatment of cervical cancer is available from the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.


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New York City recommends meningococcal vaccination for certain men who have sex with men
CDC published Notes from the Field: Serogroup C Invasive Meningococcal Disease Among Men Who Have Sex With Men—New York City, 2010–2012 in the January 4 issue of MMWR (page 1048). Portions of the article are reprinted below.

On September 27, 2012, the New York City (NYC) Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) alerted health-care providers and the public about 12 cases of invasive serogroup C Neisseria meningitidis disease (SCMD) occurring in NYC since August 2010 among men who have sex with men (MSM). . . .

By December 31, 2012, a total of 18 cases had been identified among MSM. . . . All 18 patients were hospitalized, and five deaths occurred. . . . At least seven patients had met multiple sexual partners online.

On October 4, 2012, DOHMH recommended administration of meningococcal vaccine to HIV-infected male NYC residents who had intimate contact with any man met online, through a smartphone application, or at a bar or party since September 1, 2012. On November 29, DOHMH expanded its recommendation to HIV-uninfected men with the same high-risk behaviors who reside in areas of Brooklyn where recent cases have clustered. In addition, DOHMH publicized this outbreak among the population at risk through advertising, mass e-mail messages on MSM websites, posters distributed at MSM bars and clubs, and outreach to community leaders and physicians' groups.

More information regarding invasive meningococcal disease and this outbreak is available on the CDC and DOHMH websites. Public health departments should be alert for cases of SCMD in MSM and should ask SCMD patients about sexual history, travel history (including travel to NYC), and HIV status to help determine if this outbreak is spreading to other jurisdictions.


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IAC Spotlight! Hundreds of images/photos related to vaccination and VPDs
Looking for new ways to educate your patients about the importance of vaccination? Look no further. When it comes to educating the public and healthcare professionals about the serious health effects of vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs), nothing else packs the punch of a visual image. The IAC Image Library web section provides access to hundreds of disease and vaccination-related images.

IAC has brought together images of people suffering from VPDs; pictures of healthcare professionals vaccinating children, teens, and adults; and photos taken during various global immunization campaigns, as well as pathology specimens and micrographs of viruses and bacteria. Almost all of the images are free to download and can be used in lectures, articles, and presentations.
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IAC HANDOUTS

New staff-education piece: "Pneumococcal Vaccination Recommendations for Children and Adults by Age and/or Risk Factor," along with an updated "Pneumococcal Vaccines—CDC answers your questions"
IAC recently developed a staff-education sheet titled  Pneumococcal Vaccination Recommendations for Children and Adults by Age and/or Risk Factor. It summarizes the recommendations of CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for the use of both types of pneumococcal vaccine–pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23). The document includes information pertinent to vaccinating patients of all ages and with various risk factors.

IAC also thoroughly revised the handout Pneumococcal Vaccines—CDC answers your questions, by inserting information on pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, adding new questions, and giving the handout a new design and title. It was previously titled "Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV)—CDC answers your questions."

Related Links IAC's Handouts for Patients & Staff web section offers healthcare professionals and the public more than 250 FREE English-language handouts (many also available in translation), which we encourage website users to print out, copy, and distribute widely.

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New parent handout: "Vaccinations for Infants and Children, Age 0–10 Years"
IAC recently created Vaccinations for Infants and Children, Age 0–10 Years to educate parents about the importance of making sure their child's vaccinations are up to date.

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IAC takes a fresh approach in its handout for adolescents “Vaccinations for Preteens and Teens, Age 11–19 Years”
With the handout Vaccinations for Preteens and Teens, Age 11–19 Years, IAC developed a fresh, new way to educate adolescents about the vaccines they need to stay healthy during their teen years and beyond.

Based on a piece titled "Are you 11–19 years old? Then you need to be vaccinated against these serious diseases!" the handout was completely revised, simplified, redesigned, and reorganized.

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New patient handout: "Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes"
IAC recently developed Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes to let adults with diabetes know which vaccines are recommended for them and the ages at which they should be vaccinated. The information is presented in a simple table format that is easy to read and understand.

"Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes" is part of a suite of four handouts that focuses on adults in risk groups for vaccination. IAC will add to the suite in the future and will alert IAC Express readers as new adult handouts become available.

Here are the three other handouts currently in the suite:

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FEATURED RESOURCES

Influenza is spreading and serious, and vaccination is recommended for nearly everyone, so please keep vaccinating your patients
Influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone age 6 months and older, so please continue to vaccinate your patients.

If you don't provide influenza vaccination in your clinic, please recommend vaccination to your patients and refer them to the HealthMap Vaccine Finder to locate sites near their workplace or home that offer influenza vaccination services.

Following is a list of resources related to influenza disease and vaccination for healthcare professionals and the public.

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About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.
If you have trouble receiving or displaying IAC Express messages, visit our online help section.
IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. U38IP000589 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. IAC Express is also supported by educational grants from the following companies: CSL Biotherapies; GlaxoSmithKline; MedImmune, Inc.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; Novartis Vaccines; Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, Inc.; Pfizer, Inc.; and sanofi pasteur.
IAC Express Disclaimer
ISSN: 1526-1786

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Video of the Week
Video: Degrassi's Annie Clark on HPV
Degrassi's Annie Clark on HPV: Human Papillomavirus, better known as HPV, is the leading cause of cervical cancer and genital warts among females. In this public service announcement, Annie Clark provides important information about HPV vaccination for the York Region Government of Canada.
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Issue Abbreviations
AAFP, American Academy of Family Physicians; AAP, American Academy of Pediatrics; ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; AMA, American Medical Association; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; NCIRD, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; NIVS, National Influenza Vaccine Summit; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; VPD, vaccine-preventable disease; WHO, World Health Organization.
Publication Staff
Editor: Deborah L. Wexler, MD
Managing Editor: Dale Thompson, MA
Associate Editor: Teresa Anderson, DDS, MPH
Editorial Assistant: Janelle Tangonan Anderson
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This page was reviewed on January 8, 2013
 
Immunization Action Coalition  •  Saint Paul, MN
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This website is supported in part by a cooperative agreement from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Grant No. 5U38IP000290) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA. The website content is the sole responsibility of IAC and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.