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Issue 1589
Issue 1,589: September 15, 2021
Top Stories


Immunize.org Pages and Handouts 


Featured Resources


Notable Publications


Upcoming Events


Immunization PSAs from the Archive

 


Top Stories


The White House announces strategy to combat COVID-19 and reduce the number of unvaccinated Americans
 
On September 9, the White House released a six-pronged national strategy to combat COVID-19, including an executive order requiring coronavirus disease 2019 vaccination for federal employees. Vaccine-related aspects of the plan include:

  • Requiring all employers with 100+ employees to ensure their workers are vaccinated or tested weekly
  • Requiring vaccinations for all federal workers and for all contractors that do business with the federal government
  • Requiring COVID-⁠19 vaccinations for over 17 million healthcare workers at all hospitals and other healthcare settings that receive payments from Medicare and Medicaid
  • Requiring vaccination of staff in Head Start Programs, Department of Defense Schools, and Bureau of Indian Education-operated schools, and recommending that all states require vaccination of school staff
  • Calling on large entertainment venues to require proof of vaccination or testing for entry
  • Requiring employers to provide paid time off to get vaccinated
  • Providing easy access to additional doses of vaccine as authorized by FDA
  • Providing resources to support the efficient review of vaccines for children under age 12

In the weeks ahead, federal, state, and local governments will begin the work of implementing this plan.

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Happy Mexican Independence Day! Here’s an introduction to vaccination information and advocacy in Mexico.

¡Viva México! September 16 is the 211th anniversary of Mexico’s independence. We celebrate the people of Mexico by sharing select Mexican resources for vaccination information and advocacy. Best wishes to all our friends delivering vaccinations to the people of Mexico!



Expert committees:

Advocacy groups and resources:

Helpful resources:

COVID-19 materials:

Government institutions:

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IAC hosts influenza webinars: Register for September 20 webinar and view archived video from September 9, now available online

Register now for IAC’s second influenza webinar, Translating COVID-19 Strategies to Improve Influenza Seasonal Flu Vaccination Efforts, which will be aired on Monday, September 20, from 1:00 to 2:30 p.m. (ET). See “Upcoming Events” below for more details.

On September 9, IAC hosted a webinar titled "The Continued Threat of Influenza and How to Sustain Influenza Vaccination Efforts." The topics included:

  • Influenza surveillance in the United States and worldwide
  • Changes in circulation of other common respiratory pathogens, e.g., RSV
  • Changes in influenza vaccine strains and changes in influenza ACIP recommendations
  • Communication issues providers may face regarding perceptions of the need for influenza vaccination 
  • A public perspective on the importance of influenza vaccination and advocacy for vulnerable populations 

The entire webinar is now archived for viewing. Please share the webinar link with your colleagues.

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New VIS translations to download now: IAC posts Chinese, Dari, Pashto, Turkish, and Vietnamese translations of August 6 Vaccine Information Statements for multiple vaccines

IAC has posted new translations of Vaccine Information Statements (VISs) issued by CDC on August 6 (except where noted). The new languages available are Chinese (both Simplified and Traditional), Dari, Pashto, Turkish, and Vietnamese. All translations are available in PDF and print-ready format.

VIS translations in Simplified Chinese and Traditional Chinese:

Simplified Chinese is preferred in China, Singapore, and Malaysia. Traditional Chinese is preferred in Hong Kong, Macau, and Taiwan.

VIS translations in Dari:

Dari is spoken by some people in Afghanistan and Pakistan. These VIS translations were generously donated by the Multilingual Services of CDC. 

VIS translations in Pashto:

Pashto is spoken by some people in Afghanistan, Iran, and Pakistan. These VIS translations were generously donated by the Multilingual Services of CDC. All files are dated 8/6/2021 except for Hepatitis A which is 7/28/2020.

VIS translation in Turkish:

  • Influenza, live intranasal PDF (view in English)

This translation is graciously donated by Betül Polatdemir, MD, Ankara and Sibel Bostancıoğlu, MD, Occupational and Environmental Diseases Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

VIS translations in Vietnamese

  • DTaP (Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis) PDF (view in English)
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) PDF (view in English)
  • HPV (Human Papillomavirus) PDF (view in English)
  • Influenza, inactivated PDF (view in English)
  • Influenza, live intranasal PDF (view in English)
  • Meningococcal ACWY PDF (view in English)
  • Meningococcal B PDF (view in English)
  • MMR (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella) PDF (view in English)
  • MMRV (Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Varicella) PDF (view in English)
  • Pneumococcal Conjugate (PCV13) PDF (view in English)
  • Polio PDF (view in English)
  • Td (Tetanus, Diphtheria) PDF (view in English)
  • Tdap (Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis) PDF (view in English)
  • Varicella (Chickenpox) PDF (view in English)

IAC posted Spanish translations last week. IAC will post translations into additional languages in coming weeks at Immunize.org/vis.

Translations of previous VIS versions may be used until new translations become available. CDC states that the corresponding up-to-date English-language VIS must also be supplied when providing an out-of-date translation.

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CDC launches Public Health AmeriCorps, a partnership to help recruit, train, and develop a new generation of leaders to respond to the nation’s public health needs; applications now being accepted

On September 8, AmeriCorps and CDC launched Public Health AmeriCorps, a new partnership to recruit, train, and develop a new generation of public health leaders. The program will help meet the public health needs of local communities by (1) providing much-needed surge capacity for state and local public health agencies and (2) developing pathways to public health-related careers through on-site experience and training. Public Health AmeriCorps will focus on recruiting members who reflect the communities in which they will serve. 

Supported by a $400 million investment from the American Rescue Plan, the project is expected to fund up to 5,000 AmeriCorps positions over the next 5 years.

Grants will be awarded through a competitive process, with applications due Monday, November 8, 2021 at 5:00 p.m. ET. The competition is open to nonprofit, faith-based, and community-based organizations; higher-education institutions; state, local, and territorial government entities, such as cities or counties; and Indian Tribes. Organizations not previously funded by AmeriCorps are encouraged to apply for these grants.

Learn more about how to participate in Public Health AmeriCorps.

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National medical boards endorse policy recommending penalties for physicians who spread COVID-19 misinformation

The Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) issued a statement, stating that providing misinformation about COVID-19 vaccines may subject physicians to disciplinary action, including suspension or revocation of their medical license. This position statement has been endorsed in a joint statement by the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM), the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM), and the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP). A portion of the statement appears below. 

...providing misinformation about the COVID-19 vaccine contradicts physicians' ethical and professional responsibilities, and therefore may subject a physician to disciplinary actions, including suspension or revocation of their medical license....We also want all physicians certified by our Boards to know that such unethical or unprofessional conduct may prompt their respective Board to take action that could put their certification at risk.

Expertise matters, and board-certified physicians have demonstrated that they have stayed current in their field. Spreading misinformation or falsehoods to the public during a time of a public health emergency goes against everything our Boards and our community of board-certified physicians stand for. The evidence that we have safe, effective and widely available vaccines against COVID-19 is overwhelming. We are particularly concerned about physicians who use their authority to denigrate vaccination at a time when vaccines continue to demonstrate excellent effectiveness against severe illness, hospitalization and death.

We all look to board-certified physicians to provide outstanding care and guidance; providing misinformation about a lethal disease is unethical, unprofessional and dangerous. In times of medical emergency, the community of expert physicians committed to science and evidence collectively shares a responsibility for giving the public the most accurate and timely health information available, so they can make decisions that work best for themselves and their families.

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“Monitoring Incidence of COVID-19 Cases, Hospitalizations, and Deaths, by Vaccination Status—13 U.S. Jurisdictions, April 4–July 17, 2021” published in MMWR Early Release

CDC published Monitoring Incidence of COVID-19 Cases, Hospitalizations, and Deaths, by Vaccination Status—13 U.S. Jurisdictions, April 4–July 17, 2021 in the September 10 issue of MMWR Early Release. A portion of the summary appears below. 

The incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection, hospitalization, and death is higher in unvaccinated than vaccinated persons, and the incidence rate ratios are related to vaccine effectiveness....

Across 13 U.S. jurisdictions, incidence rate ratios for hospitalization and death changed relatively little after the SARS-CoV-2 B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant reached predominance, suggesting high, continued vaccine effectiveness against severe COVID-19....

Getting vaccinated protects against severe illness from COVID-19, including the Delta variant. Monitoring COVID-19 incidence by vaccination status might provide early signals of potential changes in vaccine effectiveness that can be confirmed through robust controlled studies.

Access the MMWR article in HTML or PDF.

Related Link

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“Interim Estimates of COVID-19 Vaccine Effectiveness against COVID-19–Associated Emergency Department or Urgent Care Clinic Encounters and Hospitalizations among Adults during SARS-CoV-2 B.1.617.2 (Delta) Variant Predominance—Nine States, June–August 2021” published in MMWR Early Release

CDC published Interim Estimates of COVID-19 Vaccine Effectiveness against COVID-19–Associated Emergency Department or Urgent Care Clinic Encounters and Hospitalizations among Adults during SARS-CoV-2 B.1.617.2 (Delta) Variant Predominance—Nine States, June–August 2021 in the September 10 issue of MMWR Early Release. A portion of the article appears below. 

In this multistate interim analysis of 32,867 medical encounters among adults of all ages during June–August 2021, when the Delta variant was predominant in the United States, VE of all three authorized COVID-19 vaccines combined remained high against hospitalization (86%) and ED/UC encounters (82%). These overall VE estimates were similar to those during the months before Delta became predominant. However, VE against COVID-19 hospitalization among adults aged ≥75 years was significantly lower than that among adults aged <75 years, which had not been observed previously from this data source. This moderate decline should be interpreted with caution and might be related to changes in SARS-CoV-2, waning of vaccine-induced immunity with increased time since vaccination, or a combination of factors.

Access the MMWR article in HTML or PDF.

Related Link

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“Effectiveness of COVID-19 mRNA Vaccines against COVID-19–Associated Hospitalization—Five Veterans Affairs Medical Centers, United States, February 1–August 6, 2021” published in MMWR Early Release

CDC published Effectiveness of COVID-19 mRNA Vaccines against COVID-19–Associated Hospitalization — Five Veterans Affairs Medical Centers, United States, February 1–August 6, 2021 in the September 10 issue of MMWR Early Release. A portion of the summary appears below. 

During February 1–August 6, 2021, vaccine effectiveness among U.S. veterans hospitalized at five Veterans Affairs Medical Centers was 87%. mRNA COVID-19 vaccines remain highly effective, including during periods of widespread circulation of the SARS-CoV-2 B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant. Vaccine effectiveness in preventing COVID-19–related hospitalization was 80% among adults aged ≥65 years compared with 95% among adults aged 18–64 years....

Access the MMWR article in HTML or PDF.

Related Link

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IAC Spotlight: Expedite vaccination by using IAC’s screening checklists

In this week's IAC Spotlight, we summarize a variety of IAC screening checklists at Immunize.org. The Screening Checklist gateway page links you to forms that patients may fill out to expedite assessment of vaccination needs and contraindications. One of the most valuable features is the back of the screening checklist, which provides detailed guidance to help healthcare personnel interpret patient answers so they know if a vaccine is contraindicated or can be given with confidence.

   

IAC offers 10 screening checklists, including: 

Related Links

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Journalists interview IAC experts
 
Journalists seek out IAC experts to help explain vaccines to the public and policy makers. We help the media understand and communicate the complex work vaccinators do. Here is one of our recent citations.

Related Link

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Vaccines in the news

These recent articles convey the potential risks of vaccine-preventable diseases and the importance of vaccination.

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Immunize.org Pages and Handouts  


IAC posts updated 2021–2022 versions of its popular standing orders for administering influenza vaccine to children age 6 months through 18 years and to adults

IAC recently posted its updated 2021–2022 Standing Orders for Administering Influenza Vaccine to Children and Teens and Standing Orders for Administering Influenza Vaccine to Adults. Both handouts were modified to add the recommendation to give influenza and COVID-19 vaccines simultaneously or at any interval, and the contraindications and precautions were modified for ccIIV4, RIV4, and LAIV vaccines. The document for children and teens was also modified to add an expanded age indication for the ccIIV4 vaccine.

     

Related Links

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IAC posts updated 2021–2022 screening checklists for contraindications to intranasal and injectable influenza

IAC recently posted its updated 2021–2022 Screening Checklist for Contraindications to Live Attenuated Intranasal Influenza Vaccination to provide more specifics surrounding the issue of cerebrospinal fluid leak. IAC also posted its updated 2021–2022 Screening Checklist for Contraindications to Inactivated Injectable Influenza Vaccination to expand the options for vaccination now recommended by CDC for people who have had a severe allergic reaction to a prior dose of influenza vaccine.

     

Related Links

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Featured Resources


Show your strong support! Order IAC's "Me Vacuné…" and "I Got My COVID-19 Vaccine" buttons and stickers, now FREE to all organizations promoting or offering COVID-19 vaccination!

All organizations promoting or offering COVID-19 vaccination may order IAC’s FREE “Me Vacuné…” and “I Got My COVID-19 Vaccine” buttons and stickers, provided with support from CDC. Access this order form to request the FREE buttons and stickers for your outreach efforts while supplies last.

    

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Flu vaccine season is underway. Order IAC's flu vaccine buttons and stickers for staff and patients today!
 
After you order your vaccine, don’t forget to order your buttons and stickers. IAC “FLU VACCINE” buttons and stickers are ready to ship! Their bright red color helps broadcast your important message about the need for influenza vaccination. And the cost is reasonable.



“FLU VACCINE” BUTTONS

The button measures 1.25" across and carries a bold message! Pin on lab coats, uniforms, other clothing, tote bags, or backpacks to show support for flu vaccine.

Buttons are delivered in bags of 10 buttons per bag.

Click here for pricing and ordering information for "FLU VACCINE" buttons.

“FLU VACCINE” STICKERS

Measuring 1.5" across, these stickers adhere well to clothing and have an easy-peel-off backing.

Stickers are delivered to you cut individually (not on rolls)—available in bundles of 100.

Click here for pricing and ordering information for “FLU VACCINE” stickers.

Visit Shop IAC for additional items, including "Vaccines Save Lives" enamel pins, patient record cards, and a vaccine administration training video.

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Organizing a new vaccination program? Use IAC's Vaccinating Adults: A Step-by-Step Guide—free to download by chapter or in its entirety.

Download IAC's free 142-page book on adult vaccination, to help build your program and train your team: Vaccinating Adults: A Step-by-Step Guide (Guide).

 

This thorough "how to" guide on adult vaccination provides easy-to-use, practical information covering all essential activities. It helps vaccine providers enhance their existing adult vaccination services or introduce them into any clinical setting.

The Guide is available to download/print either by chapter or in its entirety free at www.immunize.org/guide. The National Vaccine Program Office and CDC both supported the development of the Guide and provided early technical review.

The Guide is a valuable resource to assist providers in increasing adult vaccination rates. Be sure to get a copy today!

Related Links

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IAC’s gateway page “Vaccination and COVID-19” offers a collection of tools from many organizations to sustain routine vaccination services during the pandemic

IAC’s Vaccination and COVID-19 gateway page assists healthcare professionals faced with challenges in providing routine and catch-up vaccination during the pandemic. In this gateway page, IAC has assembled key links to help both new and experienced vaccinators deliver safe, effective vaccination to people of all ages, applicable in typical and nontraditional vaccination settings.

The site facilitates access to key pandemic resource pages from major clinical and public health organizations involved in vaccination. We will update the page as needed with new links and resources specific to catch-up vaccination, so check back regularly.



To easily locate this gateway page on Immunize.org, go to the light blue band of tabs across the top, and choose "Clinic Tools." You also can use the Guide to Immunize.org at the bottom of each web page.

Related Links

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Notable Publications


“Surveillance for Adverse Events after COVID-19 mRNA Vaccination” published in JAMA

In the September 3 issue, JAMA published Surveillance for Adverse Events after COVID-19 mRNA Vaccination. The conclusion section appears below. 

In interim analyses of surveillance of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines, incidence of selected serious outcomes was not significantly higher 1 to 21 days postvaccination compared with 22 to 42 days postvaccination. While CIs were wide for many outcomes, surveillance is ongoing.

Related Link

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“Effect of Personalized Messages Sent by a Health System's Patient Portal on Influenza Vaccination Rates: A Randomized Clinical Trial” published in Journal of General Internal Medicine

In the September 1 issue, Journal of General Internal Medicine published Effect of Personalized Messages Sent by a Health System's Patient Portal on Influenza Vaccination Rates: A Randomized Clinical Trial, co-authored by IAC’s Dr. Sharon Humiston. The conclusion section appears below. 

Patient reminders sent by a health system’s patient portal that were tailored to patient demographics (young adults, older adults, diabetes) and that incorporated two behavioral economic messaging strategies (pre-commitment and loss/gain framing) were not effective in raising influenza vaccination rates.

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Upcoming Events


Virtual: Register now! IAC’s second influenza vaccination webinar on September 20. Our expert panel will offer ways to use the lessons of effective COVID-19 vaccination to inform flu vaccination efforts.

As COVID-19 vaccination efforts continue, seasonal influenza vaccination remains essential to protect health and ease the burden on healthcare systems. IAC will hold the second of its September webinars to bolster this year’s influenza vaccination efforts. 

Monday, September 20, from 1:00 to 2:30 p.m. (ET): Translating COVID-19 Strategies to Improve Influenza Seasonal Flu Vaccination Efforts. Registration is now open! The topics will include:

  • Information to improve influenza vaccination for underserved populations and for improving vaccine equity 
  • Public health strategies to reach small communities  
  • Making a strong recommendation for influenza vaccination this season   
  • Pharmacist and pharmacy lessons learned for improving vaccine access and vaccine equity for vulnerable populations

Speakers will include:

  • Laura Lee Hall, PhD, president, Center for Sustainable Health Care Quality and Equity, National Minority Quality Forum (NMQF)
  • Amy Callis, BA, MPH, principal and owner, Devi Partners, a social impact consulting network
  • Sarah Price, director of public health integration, National Association of Community Health Centers (NACHC)
  • Jennie McLaurin, MD, specialist, child and migrant health, bioethics, Migrant Clinicians Network
  • Mitchel Rothholz, RPh, MBA, executive director, American Pharmacists Association (APhA) Foundation

Following these presentations, time has been reserved for you to ask questions. This live question and answer session will include additional experts from IAC.

Register now to be sure you don’t miss this important September 20 Session designed to help you manage this uniquely challenging influenza vaccination season effectively. 

If you have not seen the first of IAC’s September influenza webinars, you can view the archived video here: The Continued Threat of Influenza and How to Sustain Influenza Vaccination Efforts.

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Virtual: Register for Duke’s Margolis Center for Health Policy webinar “School-Located Vaccination Strategies to Increase Child and Adolescent Immunization Rates during the COVID-19 Pandemic” on September 17

Duke University's Margolis Center for Health Policy and the Association of Immunization Managers (AIM) are hosting School-Located Vaccination Strategies to Increase Child and Adolescent Immunization Rates during the COVID-19 Pandemic on September 17 from 12:00–4:00 p.m. (ET). This virtual symposium assembles public health officials, leaders in K-12 education, healthcare providers, and other stakeholders to share best practices for improving childhood and adolescent immunization rates in school settings. Speakers will discuss innovative models and lessons learned for school-located COVID-19 vaccination sites, communication strategies for engaging families and building vaccine confidence, and opportunities to strengthen partnerships between public health, education, and healthcare providers to improve child and adolescent vaccination rates.  

The event is free and open to the public.
 
Register for this event.
 

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Immunization PSAs from the Archive


To conclude this PSA series, we review the celebrities who promoted the good works of the March of Dimes in the 1950s

We conclude our 2020–2021 cavalcade of video public service announcements (PSA) with this assortment of celebrity promotions for the March of Dimes.

Founded in 1938 as the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis (NFIP), the charity achieved great popularity thanks, in part, to its founder, Franklin D. Roosevelt. FDR himself was not able to walk again on his own after contracting poliomyelitis. NFIP’s popularity led to support for a systematic program to uncover the mysteries of polio and to lend a helping hand to other Americans suffering from the disease. FDR was later memorialized on the U.S. ten-cent coin, symbolic of the grass-roots fundraising effort: “Join the March of Dimes.” Once widespread poliovirus vaccination put an end to polio epidemics, the March of Dimes shifted its focus to the prevention of birth defects and premature birth. 

1953: Tennessee Ernie Ford           
1954: Cecil B. DeMille     
1954: Disney Cartoon Characters 
1954: Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz   
1954: Roy Campanella 
1955: Sammy Davis, Jr. 
1957: Captain Kangaroo   
1957: Gene Autry            
1958: Ella Fitzgerald      



We are grateful to vaccine expert Capt. William L. Atkinson, MD, MPH, USPHS (retired), who curated a collection that spans more than 50 years.

Previous PSAs featured in "Immunization PSAs from the Archive” are available when viewing any of the above videos. 

Related Links

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About IAC Express
The Immunization Action Coalition welcomes redistribution of this issue of IAC Express or selected articles. When you do so, please add a note that the Immunization Action Coalition is the source of the material and provide a link to this issue.

IAC Express is supported in part by Grant No. 6NH23IP922550 from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of IAC and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.

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