Immunization Action Coalition and the Hepatitis B Coalition

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Issue Number 296            February 18, 2002

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE

  1. Revised! "Vaccinations for Adults: You're Never Too Old to Get Shots!"

  2. Updated! "Summary of Rules for Childhood Immunization"

  3. For low-literacy patients: Vaccine Information Statements are available on video in English and Spanish

  4. CDC publishes article on U.S. measles cases

  5. 12th North American Syringe Exchange Convention is set for April 24-27 in Albuquerque

  6. First International Symposium on the Evaluation of Safety of Human Vaccines Convenes in May in Rome, Italy

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February 18, 2002
REVISED! "VACCINATIONS FOR ADULTS: YOU'RE NEVER TOO OLD TO GET SHOTS!"

This patient handout is one of IAC's Top 15 educational pieces (see IAC EXPRESS #295), and we have just improved it. The old version of the chart gave basic information for each of eight adult vaccines--influenza, pneumococcal, Td, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, MMR, varicella, and Lyme disease--visually depicting the number of doses needed and when.

We have now added meningococcal vaccine information to this handout. Be sure to give copies of this most complete, up-to-date version of "Vaccinations for Adults: You're Never Too Old to Get Shots!" to your patients.

To obtain "Vaccinations for Adults: You're Never Too Old to Get Shots," go to:
HTML: http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n18/p4030new.htm
PDF: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4030a.pdf
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February 18, 2002
UPDATED! "SUMMARY OF RULES FOR CHILDHOOD IMMUNIZATION"

IAC has just published an interim update of this two-sided table summarizing current rules for routine vaccines of childhood. The interim update reflects the recent change regarding the waiting period  between MMR (measles-mumps-rubella) or rubella vaccine and pregnancy (see IAC EXPRESS #286).

Women now should be advised by their health care providers not to become pregnant within 4 weeks following an MMR or rubella vaccine injection. Previously, women were advised to wait significantly longer--3 months--to become pregnant following MMR or rubella-only vaccination.

The "Summary of Rules for Childhood Immunization" will be updated again in April.

To obtain a copy of the "Summary of Rules for Childhood Immunization," go to:
HTML: http://www.immunize.org/childrules
PDF: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/rules1.pdf

To read "CDC publishes Notice: ACIP approves shorter pregnancy wait after receipt of rubella-containing vaccine" in IAC EXPRESS #286, go to: http://www.immunize.org/genr.d/issue286.htm#n1
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February 18, 2002
FOR LOW-LITERACY PATIENTS: VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENTS ARE AVAILABLE ON VIDEO IN ENGLISH AND SPANISH

If you work with recent immigrants or other sometimes low-literacy populations, you may find it frustrating to provide vaccinees with copies of Vaccine Information Statements (VISs) that they probably will not be able to read.

Michigan State University now offers sets of videotapes with narrations of VISs in either English or Spanish so that people who do not read well can learn about the vaccines they are receiving. They can still take home a printed VIS.

When you are not sure if someone can read, it's nice to be able to offer a choice of VIS medium. You can say, for instance, "Some people prefer to get information by listening to it rather than reading it. If  you want to hear and watch someone present this VIS information, we also have it on videotape."

The Spanish VIS videos include VISs for hepatitis B, DTaP, Hib, PCV, IPV, MMR, and varicella vaccines. The English set includes all of those plus Td vaccine. There is one VIS per tape, and the running time per VIS is generally 5 to 8 minutes.

The English and Spanish VIS videotape sets (8 and 7 tapes, respectively) cost $25 each, including shipping and handling. Allow up to 4 weeks for delivery.

To order, send your check or money order payable to Michigan State University, along with a note indicating which language set you want, to the address below:

Immunization Program
Michigan State University
B127 West Fee Hall
East Lansing, MI 48824

For more information, contact the Physician Peer Education Project on Immunization office by phone at (517) 353-2596.
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February 18, 2002
CDC PUBLISHES ARTICLE ON U.S. MEASLES CASES

On February 15, 2002, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published "Measles--United States, 2000" in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). The article discusses the record low number of cases of measles in the United States in the year 2000 and analyzes the nature  and origin of those cases, concluding in an article synopsis that "sustaining high levels of immunization is key to limiting spread of measles from imported cases and preventing measles from becoming reestablished as an endemic disease in the United States." In short, we need to keep up the good routine vaccination work we are doing here.

In 2000, according to the article, ten outbreaks (three or more confirmed cases) of measles in nine states accounted for 48 of the year's total of 86 cases of measles. A total of 20 states reported cases. For half of the ten outbreaks, an epidemiological link to an imported case was found; 26 cases were internationally imported, with 14 cases occurring in U.S. residents who had traveled abroad and 12 in  visitors to the United States. Most of the imported cases reported came from Japan, Korea, and Ethiopia.

The Editorial Note to the article reads in part as follows, excluding footnote references:

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Measles is still endemic in many countries and results in approximately 800,000 deaths per year. However, the reported incidence of measles in the United States has been <1 case per million for the past 4 years. The high percentage of cases resulting from importations and very limited indigenous spread from these imported cases also has continued over the same period. . . .

Imported measles cases consistently test the level of population immunity to measles in the United States. The average of less than one import-linked case following an international importation suggests that the level of population immunity is high, probably as a result of successful vaccination efforts in the United States. First-dose vaccination coverage among pre-school children has been greater than or equal to 90% for the past 4 years. Two doses of measles vaccine are required for school-aged children in 49 states.

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To obtain the complete text of the article online, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5106a2.htm

To obtain a camera-ready (PDF format) copy of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5106.pdf

HOW TO OBTAIN A FREE ELECTRONIC SUBSCRIPTION TO THE MMWR:
To obtain a free electronic subscription to the "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" (MMWR), visit CDC's MMWR website at: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr Select "Free MMWR Subscription" from the menu at the left of the screen. Once you have submitted the required information, weekly issues of the MMWR and all new ACIP statements (published as MMWR's "Recommendations and Reports") will arrive automatically by email.
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February 18, 2002
12TH NORTH AMERICAN SYRINGE EXCHANGE CONVENTION IS SET FOR APRIL 24-27 IN ALBUQUERQUE

The North American Syringe Exchange Network (NASEN) presents the 12th North American Syringe Exchange Convention on April 24-27 at the Sheraton Albuquerque Uptown Hotel in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

The theme of the convention is "Public Health for All Is Justice Served." Throughout the three-day event, information will be available on building a syringe exchange program from scratch, recent research data, and more. Paper presentations and interactive sessions will take place.

For hotel reservations, contact the Sheraton Uptown at (505) 881-0000 by March 22. You can receive a special room rate by referencing NASEN ($65 + tax for a single, $85 + tax for a double room).

The convention fee is $150 before March 27 and $200 thereafter. Checks, money orders, or governmental purchase orders should be made payable to PDAP/NASEN. NASEN does not accept credit card payments.

For more information about the convention or to request a registration form, please contact NASEN by phone at (253) 272-4857, fax at (253) 272-8415, or email at nasen@seanet.com

You can also visit http://www.nasen.org or http://www.harmreduction.org

To print an online registration form, go to: http://www.nasen.org/nasecxii/nasnxii.htm

Send your registration form and payment to:

The North American Syringe Exchange Network
535 Dock Street #12
Tacoma, WA 98402
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February 18, 2002
FIRST INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON THE EVALUATION OF SAFETY OF HUMAN VACCINES CONVENES IN MAY IN ROME, ITALY

The First International Symposium on the Evaluation of Safety of Human Vaccines will be held at the Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome, Italy, on May 22 and 23. The aim of the symposium is "to examine and discuss methodological problems in the assessment of the safety profile of human vaccines."

The program will include presentations and discussions on the rationale and state of the art of vaccine safety assessment, the contribution and methodological shortcomings of different study designs such as trials, post-marketing surveillance, case crossover, and systematic reviews. Additional sessions will cover ethical aspects, the role of editorial peer review, and ongoing studies and initiatives in the field of vaccine safety evaluation.

Registration is free, but space is limited, so register early in the "first-come, first-served" allotment.

For further information about the Symposium, contact Dr. Daniela Pino by phone at +011-39-06-4990-2273, fax at +39-06-4938-7292, or email at dpino@iss.it

 

Immunization Action Coalition1573 Selby AvenueSt. Paul MN 55104
E-mail: admin@immunize.org Web: http://www.immunize.org/
Tel: (651) 647-9009Fax: (651) 647-9131

This page was updated on February 18, 2002