Immunization Action Coalition and the Hepatitis B Coalition

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Issue Number 153            March 31, 2000

CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE

  1. CDC publishes article on FDA approval of alternative two-dose hepatitis B vaccination schedule for adolescents
  2. Reminder! International symposium on hepatitis and liver disease set for April 9-13
  3. "Early bird" registration deadline is May 5 for National Immunization Conference
  4. World Health Organization publishes special issue of the "Bulletin" on immunization safety
  5. CDC publishes announcement of workshop on aluminum in vaccines
  6. CDC announces availability of funds for research on the impact of public health laws and policy
  7. CDC publishes article on progress toward polio eradication in Democratic Republic of Congo

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(1)
March 31, 2000
CDC PUBLISHES ARTICLE ON FDA APPROVAL OF ALTERNATIVE  TWO-DOSE HEPATITIS B VACCINATION SCHEDULE FOR ADOLESCENTS

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published a "Notice to Readers" titled "Alternate Two-Dose Hepatitis B Vaccination Schedule for Adolescents Aged 11-15 Years" in the March 31, 2000, issue of the MMWR. This "Notice" reads as follows:

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ALTERNATE TWO-DOSE HEPATITIS B VACCINATION SCHEDULE FOR ADOLESCENTS AGED 11-15 YEARS

In September 1999, Merck Vaccine Division (Merck & Co., Inc., West Point, Pennsylvania) received approval from the Food and Drug Administration for an optional two-dose schedule of Recombivax HB for vaccination of adolescents aged 11-15 years. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices approved the optional two-dose schedule in October 1999 and recommended to include this schedule in the Vaccines for Children Program in February 2000. Using the two-dose schedule, the adult dose of Recombivax HB (1.0 mL dose containing 10 mcg of hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg]) is administered to adolescents aged 11-15 years, with the second dose given 4-6 months after the first dose. In immunogenicity studies among adolescents aged 11-15 years, antibody concentrations and end seroprotection rates (greater than or equal to 10 milli-international units per mL of antibody to HBsAg) were similar with the two-dose schedule (1.0 mL dose containing 10 mcg of HBsAg) and the currently licensed three-dose schedule (0.5 mL dose containing 5 mcg of HBsAg). The overall frequency of adverse events was similar for the two-dose schedule and the three-dose schedule. Short-term (2-year) follow-up data indicate that the rate of decline in antibody levels for the two-dose schedule was similar to that for the three-dose schedule. No data are available to assess long-term protection (beyond 2 years) or immune memory following vaccination with the two-dose schedule, and it is not known whether booster doses of vaccine will be required. As with other hepatitis B vaccination schedules, if administration of the two-dose schedule is interrupted it is not necessary to restart the series. Children and adolescents who have begun vaccination with a dose of 5 mcg of Recombivax HB should complete the three-dose series with this dose. If it is not clear which dose an adolescent was administered at the start of a series, the series should be completed with the three-dose schedule.

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To obtain the text version (HTML format) of this MMWR "Notice to Readers," go to: http://www.cdc.gov/epo/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm4912a5.htm

For information on how to obtain a free electronic subscription to the MMWR, see the instructions that follow article seven below.
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(2)
March 31, 2000
REMINDER! INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON HEPATITIS AND LIVER DISEASE SET FOR APRIL 9-13

The 10th International Symposium on Viral Hepatitis and Liver Disease is fast approaching! The conference will be held April 9-13 at the Marriott Marquis in Atlanta, GA, and is being hosted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 

This symposium will bring together international experts to discuss current research, science, and policy issues related to viral hepatitis and liver disease, and will highlight the importance of hepatitis surveillance, research, treatment, vaccination, and prevention programs in the developing world. 

Although it is too late to mail in your registration for this conference, onsite registration will be available. For information about the conference, call (404) 233-4490 or visit: http://www.hep2000.com
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(3)
March 31, 2000
"EARLY BIRD" REGISTRATION DEADLINE IS MAY 5 FOR NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION CONFERENCE

The 34th National Immunization Conference set for July 5-8 in Washington, DC, is the largest annual immunization conference in the United States. Participants must register before May 5 to take advantage of the "early bird" registration fee of $60. Individuals who register after May 5 but before June 16 will pay $85, while those who register onsite will pay $100.

For registration information, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/NIC/

You can also call the National Immunization Program at (404) 639-8225 or request information by fax at (404) 639-8828.

"IAC EXPRESS" will publish updates on the conference agenda as information becomes available.
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(4)
March 31, 2000
WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION PUBLISHES SPECIAL ISSUE OF THE "BULLETIN" ON IMMUNIZATION SAFETY

The World Health Organization recently published a "Special Theme" issue of the "Bulletin of the World Health Organization" (Vol. 78, no. 2) titled "Immunization Safety." The issue contains 12 articles on vaccine safety, including feature articles on vaccine quality and clinical safety issues, monitoring adverse events, and the Vaccine Safety Datalink; a round table discussion on vaccine adverse events in the new millennium; reprints of several "classic" public health articles on immunization safety; and an editorial on immunization safety as a global priority. 

Many of these articles are available online as camera-ready documents (PDF format) at: http://www.who.int/bulletin/tableofcontents/2000/vol.78no.2.html
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(5)
March 31, 2000
CDC PUBLISHES ANNOUNCEMENT OF WORKSHOP ON ALUMINUM IN VACCINES

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published a "Notice to Readers" titled "National Vaccine Program Office Workshop on Aluminum in Vaccines" in the March 31, 2000, issue of the MMWR. The "Notice" reads:

"CDC's National Vaccine Program Office will sponsor Workshop on Aluminum in Vaccines during May 11-12, 2000. The workshop will be held at the Caribe Hotel in San Juan, Puerto Rico, immediately following the Metal Ions in Biology and Medicine Conference. Discussion topics include vaccine adjuvants, aluminum salts in vaccines, the pharmacology and toxicology of aluminum, and macrophagic myofascitis. Additional information is available on the World-Wide Web at http://www.cdc.gov/od/nvpo/calendar.htm, or telephone (404) 687-6672."

To obtain the text version (HTML format) of this MMWR "Notice to Readers," go to: http://www.cdc.gov/epo/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm4912a7.htm

For information on how to obtain a free electronic subscription to the MMWR, see the instructions that follow article seven below.
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(6)
March 31, 2000
CDC ANNOUNCES AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS FOR RESEARCH ON THE IMPACT OF PUBLIC HEALTH LAWS AND POLICY

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued the following request for applications for research funds:

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RESEARCH PROPOSALS TO EVALUATE THE IMPACT OF LAWS ON PUBLIC HEALTH INVITED BY THE CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), through its Prevention Research Initiative, seeks to stimulate research evaluating the implementation and effects of laws on public health. Diverse statutes, regulations, contract specifications, licensing requirements, and other legally enforceable public policies are perceived to affect the prevention of disease, injury, and disability, the promotion of health, and the performance of public health services.

Research findings are expected to be valuable to public health practitioners and policy makers in their efforts to improve health in our communities. Areas of law and policies that affect public health for which CDC specifically encourages research proposals include: immunization, HIV and sexually transmitted diseases, injury related to motor vehicles, occupational safety and health, public health reporting laws, emergency public health practice, urban planning, infectious disease screening and treatment for immigrants, and the public health system and infrastructure. Proposals addressing other areas of law are also invited.

CDC will award $500,000 in competitive grant funding for new studies in this area in fiscal year 2000. Letters of intent to apply are due by April 21 and applications are due by June 2, 2000.

The request for applications is available at: http://www.cdc.gov/od/pgo/funding/00051.htm and [was] published in the "Federal Register" during the week of March 13.

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Application forms for this research grant are available at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/phs398/phs398.html

To request that an application kit be sent by U.S. mail, call CDC's Grants Management Branch at (888) 472-6874. Ask for the application kit for announcement #00051, titled "Research on the Impact of Laws and Policies in Public Health."

Contact information for business technical assistance and program technical assistance can be found in the request for applications, which is available at: http://www.cdc.gov/od/pgo/funding/00051.htm
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(7)
March 31, 2000
CDC PUBLISHES ARTICLE ON PROGRESS TOWARD POLIO ERADICATION IN DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published "Progress Toward Poliomyelitis Eradication--Democratic Republic of Congo, 1996-1999" in the March 31, 2000, issue of the MMWR. This report, along with reports from other war-torn areas, suggests that even under extremely adverse conditions, effective polio eradication strategies can be implemented.

To obtain the complete text version (HTML format) of this MMWR article, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/epo/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm4912a3.htm


HOW TO OBTAIN A FREE ELECTRONIC SUBSCRIPTION TO THE MMWR:
To obtain a free electronic subscription to the "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report" (MMWR), visit CDC's MMWR website at: http://www2.cdc.gov/mmwr Select "Free MMWR Subscription" from the menu at the left of the screen. Once you have submitted the required information, weekly issues of the MMWR and all new ACIP statements (published as MMWR's "Recommendations and Reports") will arrive automatically by e-mail.

 

Immunization Action Coalition1573 Selby AvenueSt. Paul MN 55104
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This page was updated on March 31, 2000